Ben Hayes with Finance Tycoon after winning the The Showdown at Caulfield Racecourse on April 17, 2021 in Caulfield, Australia. (George Salpigtidis/Racing Photos)

Racing Victoria (RV) and Thoroughbred Breeders Victoria (TBV) are pleased to announce a $7.5 million boost to the VOBIS Sires program.

The $7.5 million will be offered in the form of $30,000 vouchers on top the $20,000 VOBIS Gold bonus, exclusively to the winning owners of VOBIS Sires horses across the 250 VOBIS Gold bonus races run throughout Victoria.

The vouchers may be utilised by the winning owners to purchase the progeny of a VOBIS Sire at a recognised sale or can be applied to a service fee for a VOBIS Sire during the eligible breeding seasons.
Allocation of the voucher will be based on the percentage owned by the owner and in the event a syndicate is part of the ownership group, the voucher will be allocated to the syndicate (not to the individual members). Owners will have two years to utilise the voucher whether in full or part from the time the horse wins a VOBIS Gold race.

The vouchers will come into effect from the start of the 2022-23 racing season, however, any horse who is the progeny of a VOBIS Sire born from 2016 will be eligible to compete for the vouchers.

The VOBIS Sires program is highlighted by the VOBIS Sires Showdown, a $1 million race for 2YOs and the VOBIS Sires Guineas, a $500,000 race for 3YOs, both of which feature on Victorian Owners & Breeders Raceday each April.
RV Executive General Manager Racing, Greg Carpenter, said: “Thanks to today’s announcement regarding the boost to the VOBIS Sires program, our VOBIS program will now offer over $30 million annually in bonuses, prizemoney and breeding vouchers which is both a great reward and incentive for owners and breeders.
“We hope that the introduction of these vouchers will not only encourage owners to reinvest in the Victorian breeding industry, but also increase demand for Victorian-sired progeny in the sales ring and the attractiveness of racing horses in Victoria.

“I would like to thank TBV for their advocacy and support on this new initiative and we hope to see great uptake of the vouchers throughout future breeding seasons and yearling sales.”

TBV President, James O’Brien, said: “I am delighted with the announcement of the $7.5 million enhancement to VOBIS Sires which is an emerging feature of the successful VOBIS program.

“This season’s breeding season has just commenced and any broodmare owner who is still deciding on which stallion to best suit their mare should strongly consider a VOBIS Sires stallion.

“The stallion roster in Victoria headlined by Australia’s current champion sire, Written Tycoon, continues to go from strength to strength, with Victorian-sired progeny having won 16 Group 1’s across Australia last season.
“Thanks to today’s announcement, the progeny of VOBIS Sires will be extra sought after at sales with buyers looking to invest their vouchers into VOBIS Sires horses.
“The 2022 yearling sales are only a few months away and present prospective owners with the perfect opportunity to purchase VOBIS Sired horses to race for bonuses from August 2022 onwards.

“I would like to thank all the stallion farms who have supported the VOBIS Sires program since its inception and the continued commitment they have provided to Victoria.

“I’d like to thank Racing Victoria who have shown a strong commitment to supporting thoroughbreds at the grass roots, and decisions like this demonstrate that they are invested in the Victorian breeding industry.”

Image Courtesy of Racing Photos: Finance Tycoon wins the 2021 VOBIS Sires Showdown

Australia’s latest pin-up racehorse extended his remarkable winning streak to seven with a supreme front-running performance in the 1600-metre Flemington feature, defeating a red-hot field of 10 individual Group 1 winners in his very first start at the elite level.

Steve Tregea, Incentivise’s former Toowoomba-based trainer.

Tregea was delighted to share the big result with Moody and a new group of co-owners, including Ozzie Kheir and Brae Sokolski, who secured a 50 per cent share during the gelding’s all-conquering Queensland winter campaign that included victories by 9.5l in the Provincial Stayers’ Final and 12l in the G3 Tattersall’s Cup.

“That was an absolute dream result,” Tregea told TDN AusNZ. “We’ve won Group races before, but a Group 1 race in Melbourne – that’s just a different league.

“Even if he never wins another race from here, it’s worked out so well and it’s a special result for us and for the new owners as well. It’s great to share this with them. I don’t have any trouble sharing a win with other people, and if you’re losing, at least you’re sharing the expenses.

“Even if he (Incentivise) never wins another race from here, it’s worked out so well and it’s a special result for us and for the new owners as well.” – Steve Tregea

“But the way this horse is going at the moment hopefully, this won’t be the last time we’re celebrating a win.

“It’s a bit of a different experience to have the horse being trained by someone else now, but I don’t mind that either. Normally we don’t have anybody else to blame if things go wrong, and I guess we do now! But there won’t be any need to worry about that, he knows what he’s doing and he’s obviously doing a fantastic job with the horse.

“Now we just need to try to keep the horse at this level as we head through the rest of the spring and towards the Cups. He’s not a very difficult horse to train, and it’ll just be about keeping him ticking over. It’s very exciting for everyone involved.”

A ruling favourite for both the Caulfield Cup and the Melbourne Cup, Incentivise is now the winner of seven of his 10 starts, a far cry from just five months ago, when a sixth placing at Eagle Farm was his best result from three career appearances.

Incentivise being led back into the enclosure by his strapper | Image courtesy of Bronwen Healy

“He was a horse that’s just gradually kept improving throughout this year, and I guess it’s kind of snuck up on us how good he’s turned out to be,” Tregea said. “He was always going to be a stayer, so it wasn’t until he got up to those longer distances that he started to perform. Once he got that first win (over 1600 metres at the Sunshine Coast on April 11) and did it pretty easily, we realised we might have something, and he’s never looked back from there.”

Carrying on with the superstar’s siblings

Tregea breeds from a small broodmare band of around 10 at his Windermere Stud operation, which unfortunately no longer features Incentivise’s deceased dam Miss Argyle (Iglesia).

Miss Argyle being led to the barriers in the 2006 Listed Gimcrack S. | Image courtesy of Sportpix

Herself a black-type placegetter in the Listed Gimcrack S., Miss Argyle has produced eight winners from eight foals to race. Incentivise is the headline act among four stakes winners, while his Redoute’s Choice half-brother Ardrossan was a high-class performer in New Zealand who won the G3 Concorde H., placed in the G1 Waikato Sprint and now stands at Waikato Stud.

Bergerac (Drumbeats) won the Listed Bernborough H. and Ipswich Cup among 10 victories for Tregea, and Cheyenne Warrior (Not A Single Doubt) rounds out the black-type quartet with a victory in the Listed Gold Sovereign S.

Miss Argyle sadly died last spring after hitting her head on a rock in her paddock, and the foal she was carrying by Pride Of Dubai was also unable to be saved. But Tregea still has other members of the family to carry on with.

“We’ve got a 4-year-old half-brother to Incentivise called Argyle Lane, who hasn’t raced yet.” – Steve Tregea

“We’ve got a 4-year-old half-brother to Incentivise called Argyle Lane, who hasn’t raced yet,” he said. “We’ll see what happens with him. And we’re breeding from a half-sister, Flaunt, who’s due to foal within the next couple of weeks to Spirit Of Boom.

“There’s another half-sister, Ra Ra Epic, who’s in foal to Yes Yes Yes and was sold for $200,000 at the Inglis Great Southern Broodmare Sale a couple of months ago.

“So there’s still a few parts of the family around, we’ve got a bit to carry on with ourselves, and hopefully we might have a bit more luck along the way. But anyway, it’s great to be a part of what’s happening with Incentivise.”

Gosford hosted a mid-week metropolitan meeting on Wednesday, and the first race proved a thriller when 3-year-old Frosted (USA) colt Kooled narrowly held California Surreal (I Am Invincible) for a tight victory.

Kooled as a yearling | Image courtesy of Pam Crosby

The grey-coated, Hawkes-trained Kooled, who was having only his third start, looked at one point a comfortable winner on the rails, but in the straight, he hung then fanned right across the track for jockey James McDonald and gave away what otherwise might have been a cosy win.

Kooled jumped smartly from the inside barrier and took the initiative to lead, and he stayed there for much of the race with Hollywood North (Vancouver) and Excela Bella (Exceed And Excel).

Turning for home the colt had every chance until the last 150 metres when he ran out and allowed California Surreal to come wide alongside.

The pair argued out the last 50 metres of the race, with Kooled getting the upper hand narrowly. The final margins were 0.05l between first and second, with 1.5l back to the Ingham-owned Fangirl (Sebring) in third.

There was a collective sigh of relief when Kooled was announced the winner in the photo result, backed as he was into $1.90 favouritism. It was also a relief for McDonald, who didn’t have the easiest of rides.

“He’s a beautiful horse,” the jockey said. “He oozes a lot of quality, and once the penny drops he’s going to be a goody. Obviously, he did a lot of things wrong, but in saying that it’s a tight-turning track and that’s probably the first time he’s seen that.”

McDonald said post-race that it wasn’t ideal to be leading on the colt, but the good barrier prompted it.

“He (Kooled) oozes a lot of quality, and once the penny drops he’s going to be a goody.” – James McDonald

“They mustered speed really quickly and I was very comfortable in using him to guide through his gears early,” he said.

“He got a bit lost then and luckily we got a result. He was like a crab going left instead of going straight, and it just shows how much ability he’s got. He’s a lovely raw horse with plenty to play with.”

Bigger targets in mind

Kooled’s owner-breeder, Tamworth-based Rob Crosby, watched the race from home with similar trepidation.

“We thought he’d got there but it was close, we might have to take him to Victoria to run the other way after that.” – Rob Crosby

“We thought he’d got there but it was close,” Crosby said. “We might have to take him to Victoria to run the other way after that.”

Crosby said the horse had no reason to run across the track at Gosford as he did, but like McDonald he said it showed the colt had plenty in-hand to still produce a result.

“We watched the race from our lounge room, and we always knew this was going to be a beautiful colt,” Crosby said. “He was a beautiful foal when he was born, and we don’t usually race colts but we thought we’d try this fellow and everyone loves a grey, so if he’s any good he’ll have a good following.”

Rob and Pam Crosby

Crosby said Kooled holds a nomination for the G1 Golden Rose and G1 Caulfield Guineas, but he was reluctant to be confident about the colt’s chances of making the fields.

“I don’t think he’s going to have enough ratings to get into those races,” Crosby said. “He’ll need to win a couple more races. It was probably our fault, because after he ran in the VRC Sires’ Produce he needed a spell and we kept him home too long. All of his combatants are already racing now, so we probably shouldn’t have given him as long a spell as we did.”

Kooled was second in his debut race at Canterbury last February as a 2-year-old and was thereafter unplaced to Lightsaber (Zoustar) in the G2 VRC Sires’ Produce S. in March. After that, he was spelled and won his first trial back at Rosehill in late August. It was a promising return for his connections.

“The beauty of today’s run is that he’s never gotten out of the barrier so quickly.” – Rob Crosby

“The beauty of today’s run is that he’s never gotten out of the barrier so quickly,” Crosby said. “To lead as he did all the way at Gosford and have enough to win with that second horse peppering him all the way, that was pretty good.”

The ‘little Chautauqua’

Kooled is from the first Australian crop of Darley’s American shuttler Frosted (USA), and the seventh foal from the One Cool Cat (USA) mare Dawned (NZ). This is an old family nurtured by Sir Patrick Hogan, who bred Dawned along with her dam Our Dawn Run (NZ) (Sir Tristram {Ire}).

Frosted (USA) | Standing at Darley

Dawned is a half-sister to G2 Emancipation S. winner Beat The Fade (NZ) (Maroof {USA}) and G3 Cuddle S. winner Dawn Till Dusk (NZ) (Manntari {Ire}), while Kooled himself is a half-brother to the G2 Guy Walter S. winner Dawn Dawn (All Too Hard).

In fact, Dawn Dawn was the first foal bred by Crosby from Kooled’s dam Dawned after he purchased the mare from Patinack Farm at the 2013 Magic Millions National Broodmare Sale. He paid as little as $45,000, something he puts down to uncertainty at the time about her sire.

“The next one we got from her (Dawned) was Enjoy Elsie, who was by Sepoy, and she was probably the best one, but she fractured her pelvis after one race.”

“The next one we got from her (Dawned) was Enjoy Elsie, who was by Sepoy, and she was probably the best one, but she fractured her pelvis after one race.” – Rob Crosby

Enjoy Elsie (Sepoy) is now one of Rob and Pam Crosby’s six broodmares at home in Tamworth, and she has a Frosted three-quarter yearling brother to Kooled and is due to foal to Pierata this spring. She is one of two daughters of Dawned that the Crosbys have, and she is more valuable to them now than ever.

Rob Crosby opted to sell Kooled’s dam at the Magic Millions National Broodmare Sale this year, and she sold to Arrowfield Stud, via Jon Freyer, in foal to The Autumn Sun for $200,000.

Freyer, Arrowfield’s bloodstock manager, said the decision to buy Dawned was all about her smart grey colt Kooled.

“We’d been very impressed with him as a 2-year-old, which is why we bought her,” Freyer said, before admitting the irony about Kooled’s Gosford win on Wednesday. “They call him ‘little Chautauqua’, but he led today.”

Freyer confirmed that Dawned is booked to debut shuttler Admire Mars (Jpn) at Arrowfield this season, the stallion serving his first book after a highly successful racing career in Asia that included three Group 1 wins.

Admire Mars (Jpn) | Standing at Arrowfield Stud

Admire Mars will stand at Arrowfield this season for $22,000 (inc GST).

Yulong Investments has announced the appointment of Harry King to the role of Sales and Nominations, joining the team led by Manager Troy Stephens.

The appointment was brought on by the significant growth of Yulong’s breeding division in recent months, following the acquisition of the now six-strong stallion roster and the increase to the broodmare band.

Hailing from New Zealand, Harry has a lifetime of experience in the thoroughbred racing and breeding industry as a son of Nick and Anne-Marie King of Waikato’s Brighthill Farm. 

Involved in the day-to-day operations of his parent’s stud from an early age, Harry then spent several years dividing his time between Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Working for reputable studs and preparers such as Vinery Stud, Ascot Farm and Yarraman Park during the sales seasons, he has also completed preparations with Round Hill Stud (Limerick), and a stint with Baroda and Colbinstown in County Kildare, Ireland. 

Harry spent three years with New Zealand Bloodstock as their Hospitality Manager, gaining huge insights in the sales and marketing of thoroughbred breeding. When the pandemic hit, Harry took up the opportunity to work for the NZB online arm in Gavelhouse.com, further enhancing his skills and knowledge of the bloodstock auction world.

“Harry comes to Yulong with fantastic credentials and global networks,” said Yulong Nominations & Sales Manager, Troy Stephens. 

“His enthusiasm and drive match the ethos we strive for here at Yulong and we’re looking forward to generating more success with Harry as part of the team.”

“I was very fortunate to meet Mr Zhang a few years ago in New Zealand,” said King.

“His love for horses and his industry knowledge is admirable and I’m incredibly excited for this opportunity to work under the Yulong banner.”

With operations based in the thoroughbred heartland of north-eastern Victoria, Yulong’s stallion roster boasts the current Australian Champion General Sire Written Tycoon, as well as third-season sire Grunt, second-season sire Alabama Express, and newcomers Lucky Vega, Tagaloa, and Yulong Prince.

This is the second year we have conducted online webinars, and we are very grateful to everyone who has assisted with bringing the series to life.

We are incredibly grateful to our long-standing partners Avenel Equine Hospital and Surewise Insurance, who joined us to provide important information.

We also would like to thank Agrifutures Australia, who provided essential updates about projects they are conducting on behalf of the Thoroughbred industry.

Post this year’s webinars, we have launched our educational webinar library, which will be the home for all our recorded webinars, including those which were conducted in 2020.

We hope to add to this over the coming years and welcome any suggestions for future webinars.

You can access the library by clicking here.

If you would like to make any suggestions, please get in touch with us at tbv@racingvictoria.net.au

Ryan McEvoy (Racing and Sports)

Ryan McEvoy, one of the figures behind powerful Victorian Alliance colts fund headed by his employer Rosemont Stud, liked what he saw from the new partnership’s first two juveniles to officially barrier trial at Cranbourne yesterday, but he has been around long enough not to get ahead of himself.

Nevertheless, Rosemont Stud’s general manager of bloodstock declared it an exciting start to the Alliance’s first big-stakes foray into the yearling market and, at Cranbourne yesterday, it was Millane (Zoustar) who trialled nicely in heat nine behind stablemate Rampant Lion (Frankel) over 800 metres.

Rampant Lion, who was bred and is co-owned by Rosemont Stud’s Anthony Mithen and Nigel Austin, won the heat by three-quarters of a length in a time of 46.96 seconds with Brian Higgins in the saddle.

The Phillip Stokes-trained Runaway Belle (Pariah) was another half a length away in third.

In the other two-year-old heat, also over 800 metres, the Alliance’s Moody-trained Brereton (Zoustar) was not asked for an effort late in the heat but he still worked home stylishly to finish a neck behind the Shawn Mathrick-trained The Wizard King (Flying Artie).

The Anthony and Sam Freedman-trained Cannonball (Capitalist) was a further five lengths away in third.

“It is early days, but it is really pleasing that there are a couple of horses who have put their hand up to potentially be a candidate for an early two-year-old race,” McEvoy said. “It is exciting, but I am also guarded that they are two-year-olds. They can very easily find themselves in the paddock in the next week as well.

“Certainly, PG (Moody) has got those two colts, in addition to Rampant Lion who we are obviously connected to as well, coming along nicely.

“There hasn’t been one update regarding their shins or that they’re getting tired, they’re working and come back to their box eating up and sticking their head out of the box the next morning saying, ‘where’s the saddle?’. It is a pleasing start.”

Rampant Lion, who was passed in at the Magic Millions sale in January before Mithen and Austin struck a deal with syndicator Wylie Dalziel to sell down part of the talented colt, and Millane were broken in and pre-trained by Brad Pearson. Marty Lacey handled the early education of Brereton and McEvoy also credited Moody for his handling of the three colts associated with Rosemont.

Millane and Brereton are two of a dozen two-year-olds purchased by the Victorian Alliance, which includes Noorilim Park’s Peter and Glen Carrick, Glentree Thoroughbreds’ Bruce Wilson and Musk Creek Farm’s David Kobritz, at the 2021 yearling sales.

Another Victorian Alliance-owned colt Quinlan (I Am Invincible – Precious Lorraine by Encosta De Lago) is on track to have his first public hit-out at Monday’s official two-year-old barrier trial session on the Kensington track in Sydney.

Trained by Gai Waterhouse and Adrian Bott, Quinlan was a $600,000 purchase from the Magic Millions sale by the Alliance in conjunction with agents Suman Hedge and UK-based David Redvers.

“It is not often you get those two-year-olds who just never have any sign of showing tiredness or the fact that they are over the top. At some stage, they will need a spell, but if we can get them through to a race, that would be a wonderful result for all our partners in those horses,” he said.

“We think we’ve got a couple of nice ones in the paddock as well who at this early stage have shown us above average ability as well, so it’s not just these colts we’ve got up and going now.

“We’re reasonably bullish about some of our colts who have had a bit of a look at the stables and are back out. There is a bit to look forward to but, again, I am really mindful that the two-year-old trial form at this time of year can be neither here nor there.”

As for Rampant Lion, McEvoy is comfortable at this stage by the farm’s decision to retain the Frankel (Galileo) colt who is out of Furnival (Street Cry), a three-quarter sister to Telperion, a half-sister to Varda (Lonhro) and Yavanna (Redoute’s Choice), herself the dam of Group 1 winner Kementari (Lonhro).

“He was a really unique sort of horse to present to sale and we thought all along that he was a pretty special sort of colt, hence we were prepared to defend him at a fairly serious level and that’s okay,” McEvoy said.

“There were a couple of offers that came across us after he left the ring. In fact, we probably could have sold the horse, but Wylie Dalziel came to us with an offer and, look, we’ve got a pretty good connection with Wylie through Mr Quickie and a number of horses and we enjoy that relationship.

“Wylie was a big believer in the horse, as was Peter Moody, and ultimately we sat down with Wylie and reached a deal. 

“You could dare to dream on a horse like him. He was offered at sale and I suppose Frankel has gone to another level, if that was possible, since that sale. I don’t know how many Group 1 winners he’s had since January, but it’s a handful (six) and he’s probably taken up the mantle as the world’s best stallion post the sad demise of his sire (Galileo).”

Brooklyn Hustle set for Moir

Meanwhile, the Rosemont Stud-owned Brooklyn Hustle (Starspangledbanner) tuned up for her first-up A J Moir Stakes (Gr 1, 1000m) tilt at Moonee Valley on Friday week with a slashing barrier trial at Cranbourne yesterday.

The Jason Warren and Dean Krongold-trained Brooklyn Hustle, who won Group races in Adelaide and Brisbane last campaign, charged home under Brett Prebble to win heat eight over 800 metres by a length.

“She is obviously a very good mare fresh, albeit she finished her campaign last time in with a couple of Group races (wins),” McEvoy said.

“She is a very effective mare who loves the Valley. It’s no secret we think she’s a Group 1 horse and her runs at Group 1 level to date have been really, really competitive, particularly in a race like the Oakleigh Plate (when fourth).

“She’s trialled up super and she is going to run a really big race. Now that she’s a bit older, you wonder if they will retain their dash but judging by that trial this morning it looks like she has.”

Article courtesy of ANZ News

Tooradin after winning the TAB Long May We Play Plate at Flemington Racecourse on September 11, 2021 in Flemington, Australia. (Brett Holburt/Racing Photos)

Businessman Gerry Ryan, who raced 2010 Melbourne Cup winner Americain in partnership with Kevin and Colleen Bamford, is again chasing glory in Australia’s biggest race with a son of the stallion that gave him his first Cup victory.

Ryan, well known for his ownership of Jayco Caravans, parts owns five-year-old Americain gelding Tooradin which was bred and sold by Balius Farm at Darnum in Gippsland.

Tooradin was purchased as a weanling at the Great Southern Sale of 2017 for $65,000, which was more than double what Balius Farm’s owners Jacqui Sushames and her husband Tom Dieu expected.

Ryan purchased the weanling with a group of Victorian entrepreneurs – Adam Campbell, Brett Murry, Wal Pisciotta and brothers Ray and Ron Weinzierl – who spent millions of dollars turning Gumbuya Park at Tynong North into Gumbuya World.

The amusement park has developed into a major tourist location and isn’t far from Tooradin’s birthplace at Darnum.

Now with six wins from 15 starts, the gelding’s last two wins have been at 2400m at Caulfield and over 2500m at Flemington last Saturday to give Caulfield co-trainers Ciaron Maher and David Eustace confidence that the gelding can win a decent staying race in the spring.

Tooradin holds nominations for the $755,000 The Metropolitan (2400m) at Randwick on October 2, the $5.150 million Caulfield Cup (2400m) on October 16 and the $7.630 million Melbourne Cup on November 2.

After originally standing at Swettenham Stud, Americain now resides as Colleen and Kevin Bamford’s Daisy Hill Thoroughbred Farm, where he served eight mares last year and ten the season before.

With prize money of $358,650, Tooradin is quickly closing in on Americain’s biggest price earner and his only stakes winner, Eperdument, which won the Group 3 SAJC Lord Reims Stakes and has $382,870 in prizemoney from 49 starts.

Tooradin’s dam Socialize (Iffraaj x High Tea) has had an interesting journey in racing, having been bred by Merrivale Farm’s Jen Fowler at Gooram.

Jen bought High Chaparral mare High Tea (NZ) in New Zealand and put her to Iffraaj, where the resultant foal (Socialize NZ) was sold as a yearling in New Zealand where she was bought by Western Australian bloodstock agent John Chalmers for $10,000.

Socialize was transported to Australia and had one start at Bunbury, where she beat home four runners in a 15 horse three-year-old maiden. She was then bought by Balius for $8,000 at the Inglis March Thoroughbred Sale.

Socialize had seven starts for Pakenham trainer Cameron Templeton and ran third first-up and soon ran another third before breaking her maiden status at Moe over 2050m. The mare was retired after another three starts and produced Tooradin as her first foal.

And Jen said that while High Tea remained in New Zealand, she also had foals by Jimmy Choux and Stravinsky. Brought back to Australia by Jen, she has had another five foals.

“She has just actually had a magnificent Alabama Express colt,” Jen said. “She is a pretty fabulous mare.”

Jacqui Sushames said it was exciting to see the horse they’d bred from a mare they raced win at Flemington.

She said they have a breeding right to Americain and believed with Socialize (NZ) being from an older, tough New Zealand staying family that the mating would suit their plan to breed a stayer.

“To us, it was a fairly obvious choice as the dye hadn’t been cast on him (Americain),” Jacqui said.

“To be honest, when we sold the colt, they had just gone off him as a whole.

“But we wanted to breed a stayer, and that’s what we were aiming to do and it kind of looks like we have somewhat achieved that, which is awesome.”

Socialize was covered by another staying stallion last week, Triple Crown winner Justify (Scat Daddy x Stage Magic).

“She is a pretty small mare, but gee, she throws me a good horse every year,” Jacqui said.

“Honestly, she doesn’t fail, which is amazing.”

And Jacqui admits the $65,000 paid by the Ryan team for a weanling by Americain that year was an extremely good price and was significantly more than what they were hoping to get because of the staying pedigree.

“He was always a lovely type and very correct, and when we went to the sales, we thought it would be nice if we could get $25,000 for that colt, even though he was very nice,” she said.

“But their team saw something in him, and it’s just lovely when you horse rewards someone who has put their support behind the farm. It’s a good result for everyone.

“It was a huge result for us because we were just putting our toe in the water to breed more commercial horses and with a pedigree being by Americain and out of a mare that had won over 2000m at Moe, you are sort of thinking that most people won’t be thinking it’s the hottest thing in the sale.

“Staying pedigree on a staying pedigree just doesn’t tend to sell here,’’

Jacqui said she could understand why people want their up and running two-year-olds when compared to Tooradin, who is finally getting the runs on the board as a five-year-old.

She said a lot of time, effort and patience had gone into getting Tooradin into the position he’s in today, and it’s a credit to his owners and trainers.

And she believes that on pedigree, Tooradin will probably be a better horse in 12 months as on his breeding, he should be at his best as a six or seven-year-old.

Socialize’s next foal after Tooradin was a colt by No Nay Never (USA), which is now a four-year-old gelding named Gluck Runner, which was trialled last week but is yet to race in Hong Kong. It was sold for $90,000 at Melbourne Premier’s 2019 yearling sale.

The third foal, named Goodifwecould, is an unraced three-year-old gelding by Cable Bay which is trained by Allan and Jason Williams at Cranbourne. It is owned by prominent Hong Kong-based Price Bloodstock. The gelding sold for $80,000 at last year’s Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

Caulfield trainer John Moloney paid $160,000 for Socialize’s fourth foal, a filly by Vancouver, at this year’s Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale, but Balius has retained 50 per cent.

Being the first filly out Socialize, Jacqui said they were keen to retain a significant share of her with the possibility of eventually breeding from her if she could emulate Tooradin’s racetrack feats.

And Socialize’s Brazen Beau colt will go through Melbourne Premier next year.

Jacqui said they’d discussed sending Socialize back to Americain even though he wasn’t high in the popularity stakes.

“If a horse can run, that’s what it is about, and it’s not about popularity,” she said.

“I am not going to be too harsh about the stallion, especially with the way Tooradin was able to tough it out on Saturday.”

Tooradin was in the first draft of weanlings offered by Balius, and they were prepped by Springmount.

Daisy Hill Thoroughbred’s Colleen Bamford said they were only getting a trickle of broodmares to Americain (Dynaformer x America), and in the two seasons that they’ve stood him, he had ten coverings last season and eight the previous year.

“The breeders tend to want the sprinting stallions these days,” she said.

“There were some breeding rights sold in him in the early days, so we get a few of them, and we get a few outsiders.

“His strike rate isn’t too bad, and they all take a little bit of time. Unfortunately, in this day and age, people aren’t willing to wait.

“He looks magnificent and is in great nick, and it’s a shame we haven’t got a few more mares booked to him.”

Colleen said that as Americain is no longer a dual hemisphere horse, he has settled right down.

“He is a lovely horse, and he got a chance early, but I think a lot of his horses were pushed too hard too early because the incentives are there for two-year-olds,” she said.

Colleen and her husband are currently racing a four-year-old by Americain, out of Sunnyvale, which they bred, named Silicon Valley. The gelding has had seven starts for two wins – one over 2000m and the other at 2150m.

“We have given him time, and Dave Eustace loves him,” Colleen said.

“But he is a huge horse. He is back at work and is out of my favourite mare, and I just kept him for myself, and it’s a bit of fun, and Dave wants to jump him, and he is already qualified. I said not yet.”

The Maher and Eustace training team also have other American progeny in their stables, including gelding Chaska and fillies Forliah and Michante, which are all talented and out of the mare Sioux Seas Angel.

And Daisy Hill Thoroughbred’s stud manager Shane Freeman is hoping that Americain can get back to serving around 50 mares this season.

“We have a lot of enquiries this year because he is constantly getting winners,” he said.

“Tooradin might be the big one I’ve been waiting for.

“Americain has got a great strike rate, and you can’t go wrong there.”

Freeman said Americain’s fee for this season, his third at Daisy Hill, is $4400.

Asked about the possibility of a Cup run, Ciaron Maher said: “You never know. Now we’ll look at raising the bar, and whether it is a Bart Cummings or something like that, we’ll see if we can sneak into a Cup.

“All races are on the table from him. He generally likes his runs spaced a little. He did back up after two weeks this time, but his demeanour was a bit more casual, so I think he does enjoy that extra week.”

Winning jockey Damian Lane was asked whether Tooradin had Group staying potential.

“He’s got all the qualities,” Lane said in his postrace interview.

“The Maher-Eustace stable is so good at it, and he’s got the right attitude. He’s relaxed and quickens up when you need him.”

Sirileo Miss ridden by Craig Williams wins the Ladbrokes Easy Form Handicap at Ladbrokes Park Hillside Racecourse on September 08, 2021 in Springvale, Australia. (Pat Scala/Racing Photos)

Two wins in two days from a filly and a mare out of a broodmare bought for $75,000 is giving Miranda Park’s Gary O’Meara plenty of hope for a colt from the same mare that will be offered at next year’s Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

The broodmare – She’s Sirius (Galileo x Canicula) – produced Sirileo Miss (Pride of Dubai) at Sandown last week for a first-up win over 1300m, while Notions (Press Statement) won over 1600m at Hawkesbury the following day.

Sirileo Miss, already Group 3 placed, is trained at Warrnambool by Symon Wilde, while Notions is in the care of Richard and Michael Freeman at Rosehill.

“She has done a good job, and we are very happy with her,” O’Meara said of She’s Sirius.

“The Pride of Dubai is the first one we’ve had out of her, which is Sirileo Miss, and the next one was by Press Statement, which is Notions.

“She then had a Divine Prophet, which is now a two-year-old called She is Divine, and she is with Symon Wilde, and we have a yearling colt by Merchant Navy which is going to go to the Premier Sale.

“He is very similar to the mare and is a chestnut with a baldy face. Her first foal was like that too, a horse called Coys (Dylan Thomas), and he won six in Sydney and was quite a good horse.”

The first seven out of the mare – the first two were colts, and the next five were fillies – have all won, which puts a bit of pressure on the Merchant Navy colt.

“Those all got to the track, and all won multiple races,” O’Meara said.

“We gave her a year off after the Merchant Navy colt was born as it was getting quite late and is being covered by King’s Legacy probably next week.’’

He said the Galileo factor was a big appeal when they decided to buy. She’s Sirius as she is out of a Rory’s Jester mare, which provides a good blend of speed and stamina.

“She herself was a useful racehorse and just a nice type of mare,” O’Meara said.

The credit for buying She’s Sirius, who was in foal to Pride of Dubai, goes to O’Meara’s son Tom who worked as a diesel mechanic.

“Actually, it was my son Tom who bought the mare,” O’Meara said

“Tom is a diesel mechanic, and a bit over five years ago, he came back and has been working with us at Miranda Park and is now a partner in the business with us.

“This had been the very first sale that Tom had been to by himself and bought the mare and paid $75,000 for her, and it was a bit of a spend for his first crack at it.

“But I think we should be sending him to the sales more often.”

O’Meara said his son had a good eye for a horse and put a lot of time in studying the catalogue, and when the mare measured up physically after he inspected her, they were happy to spend that sort of money to purchase her.

Being in foal obviously cushioned the cost of the mare, but O’Meara admits they were a little bit disappointed at the time that the Pride of Dubai filly only made $60,000.

“She was a lovely type of weanling, but she is just growing and growing into quite a tall yearling, and I think that put some people off, O’Meara said.

“But when Symon Wilde bought her, we sort of thought our best way of capitalising on a nice filly we bred was to stay in her.

“We took a share, and my brother Shane took a share in her, and we are very pleased that we did.”

O’Meara said the filly needs to settle a bit more pre-race, and while her behaviour away from the track is fine, she gets a bit hot and stirred up in the mounting yard.

“Once she overcomes that, I think it will help her achieve her maximum potential in the races, and it probably cost her a bit in the Australasian Oaks when she was only beaten 1.2 lengths (she finished five of 16),” he said.

“She got very hot in the mounting yard and going out onto the track and had burnt up a lot of energy by the time she got into the race but was still good enough to finish very close to them.”

While it was a very strong field at Sandown last week, the odds of $5.50 seemed generous given that the filly had previously won both of her first-up races.

“With her first-up record being impeccable, it gave us a bit of confidence,” he said.

“Craig Williams, a good barrier and it all panned out beautifully. Craig gave her a perfect ride, and when the gap opened and when she made run at the top of the straight, Mick Price and Michael Kent’s horse Cambourne went past her to take the lead, and I thought we might have been in a bit of strife then.

“But she really dug in and was very determined and strong to the line.”

O’Meara said if everything goes to plan, Sirileo Miss might finish up in the Matriarch Stakes (2000m), but Williams believes the filly would be better kept to around the 1400m distances.

“But I’m sure Symon will work that out and send her to where she has the best chance, but I think the run the other day and the ability she has shown, I think it’s pretty likely that she’ll measure up to a black-type race.

“I can’t see why she can’t get up to 2000m again.”

Already with three wins and three minor placings, from seven starts, O’Meara said the filly would be a handy breeding proposition once she finished racing, and if possible, it would be good to get hold of her for his broodmare band.

But he said it would probably be a double-edged sword because the way she was heading, she’d likely become a valuable breeding proposition down the track.

“But we still own the two-year-old half-sister, She’s Divine, which is also with Symon Wilde, so at least we have her from the mare going forward,” he said.

“Even if the group racing her were interested in having her back here, we’d be interested in being part of her breeding future.

“But we’ll just see what happens.”

The ownership group was put together by Wilde, and they have all become good friends with O’Meara.

O’Meara said Notions was always a beautiful filly.

“She was standout as a big, strong athletic filly as a young horse and a very impressive yearling.

“I guess Press Statement at the time wasn’t the flavour of the month but having said that, she was a very attractive filly and had her share of admirers. She was very good in terms of x-rays and scopes but there again, similar to Sirileo Miss, and we were expecting her to make more than what she did.

“She made $70,000 and was certainly a good type all the way through.”

O’Meara said that with Sirileo Miss and Notions performing well on the track, along with the She’s Sirius’ other five progeny, he was hoping that the Merchant Navy colt could have some value-added to him.

But he said a bit would depend on whether Merchant Navy can come up with some winners before next year’s sale.

“You would be expecting that he would be quite popular at the sales,” O’Meara said.

Notions holds nominations for next month’s three-year-old fillies races, the Flight Stakes (1600m) at Randwick and the Thousand Guineas (1600m) at Caulfield.

With She’s Sirius already producing the stakes-placed Sophia’s Choice (second in the listed Springtime Stakes at Flemington) and Sirileo Miss (third in the Group 3 Auraria Stakes), O’Meara said if Notions could get black type and Sirileo Miss could step up and win a stakes race, then it would also give the Merchant Navy colt a huge boost.

O’Meara said they are breeding from 12 of their own broodmares who are foaling to an assortment of stallions, including Toronado, Impending, Street Boss, and Turffontein, which Miranda Park has a share in.

The Impending mating with Impinge (Generous x Imco Resource) has produced a recently born colt, while Corcovado (Churchill Downs x Lominata) had a Turffontein colt which is a three quarter to filly Atomic Lokade which has won 10 races.

The most commercial broodmare at Miranda Park is the recently purchased Supriym Story (General Nediym x Grand Story) which O’Meara paid $70,000 for at the red hot Gold Coast National Broodmare sale earlier this year.

Supriym Story is the dam of 2015 Group 1 VRC Oaks (2500m) winner Lasqueti Spirit (Beneteau).

“We have just been trying to upgrade the mares all the way through and have them going to these better stallions to get a decent draft into Melbourne Premier,” O’Meara said.

“Supriym Story was in foal to Headwater when we bought her. I wouldn’t call her a bargain, but she stood out as a fair price considering what they were going for.”

O’Meara is also buoyed with Coolmore paying $850,000 for Lasqueti Spirit’s first foal, a colt by Pierro, at this year’s Australian Easter Yearling Sale.

Now a two-year-old, the colt is unnamed, and the mare has since been to Dundeel (NZ) and Deep Field.

“So it’s a chance for the family to kick on,” he said.

O’Meara said they would accommodate 60 outside mares this breeding season.

“They come here to foal down and then be walked on studs around Victoria and New South Wales,” he said. “It keeps us busy.”

O’Meara said they breed and prepare their own yearlings with the focus on Melbourne Premier.

 

 

Incentivise ridden by Brett Prebble returns to the mounting yard after winning the PFD Food Services Makybe Diva Stakes at Flemington Racecourse on September 11, 2021 in Flemington, Australia. (Reg Ryan/Racing Photos)

Rosemont Stud principal Anthony Mithen said he was unaware but excited that Shamus Award is shadowing his famous father Snitzel for the number of stakes winners at the same stage of their stallion careers.

“At the same point of his career in September 2013, with his fifth crop about to hit the track, Snitzel had 15 stakes winners, the identical amount as Shamus Award has produced to this point,” TDN reported this week.

“Snitzel did have more winners, 184 to 147, but Shamus Award has more Group 1 winner, with Incentivise his fourth after his win in Saturday’s Makybe Diva S. At this point of his career, Snitzel had one Group 1 winner.

“In fact, Shamus Award has produced more individual Group 1 winners – four – since the start of last season than any other Australian stallion, a measure of just how well he is tracking.”*

Mithen said Shamus Award had been fully booked for several weeks and will serve his biggest book of mares. He made his debut as a stallion in 2014 when he had 165 coverings.

He served 177 mares last season, and Mithen said the stallion would cover 200 this season.

“Isn’t he going well,” Mithen told TBV this week. “What will be interesting is that comparison to Snitzel. Everyone will be saying he is a gun stallion and has always been a gun stallion; well, it took him a little while for him to hit his straps and build some numbers that were elite.”

Mithen said it would be interesting to see whether Shamus Award’s progeny do train on and are not just “here one minute and gone the next sort of horses.”

“That might be a factor,” he said. “But look at Incentivise. He is a five-year-old and is just hitting his straps now.

“I suppose the train on factor might be quite relevant.”

Mithen said Shamus Award continued to show his versatility by producing all types of distance horses, which is highlighted by Swats That which will be high up in the markets for Friday week’s Group 1 Moir Stakes (1000m) and boom horse Incentivise, which is favourite in both the Caulfield and Melbourne Cups.

He said Snitzel isn’t known for being a prolific producer of distance horses but still managed to get the odd good one over a trip but nothing like Incentivise.

Rosemont Stud-bred Shamus Award’s Mr Quickie and remained in the ownership of the two-time Group 1 winner, which had the ultimate success in the Queensland Derby (2400m) and the Toorak Handicap (1600m).

Mithen said Shamus Award would get very chance to bring up the double century of mares at Rosemont.

He said they were getting mares from all over the place, and this week Shamus Award had covered the dam of Swear, Crossyourheart, an example of the quality of mare being sent to him.

“The stallion boys said they can already notice the difference in the quality and type of mare that is coming this year as opposed to his first two years with us,” Mithen said.

“His stats are really encouraging, and it shows what he is doing now based on not getting the best opportunity, whereas now he is going to get that best opportunity. The sky is the limit now.”

Shamus Award, a winner of the Cox Plate (2400m) and Australian Guineas (1600m), only served 84 mares the season before he was relocated from New South Wales to Rosemont.

Mithen believes the drop off as a result of the fierce competition he was facing and the breeder’s fascination for “new shiny toys.”

“Everyone loves a new shiny toy,” he said.

“Breeding, I suppose, used to be an art, and you used to match the stallion to your mare, and it didn’t matter about the new shiny toy.

“You would breed to that stallion because that’s what suited your mare, but people are looking to the commercial aspect so often.”

Mithen said that the third and fourth years of a stallion could become very tricky.

Rosemont will support Shamus Award with 22 of the stud’s own broodmares and a couple more that could soon be retired off the track.

Breeders who got into Shamus Award for $11,000 in his first season at Rosemont and $19,800 last year could be feeling quite smug, according to Mithen, with the stallion’s fee rising to $33,000 this season.

“Those at the $33,000 could be feeling quite smug because in the past couple of weeks, I reckon we would have knocked back 25 or 30 bookings,” he said.

“They were nice mares. Breeders are keen to write the cheque for $33,000 because they are still getting a bargain because his statistics measure up in a real sense with horses like Dundeel, Pierro, and So You Think. And they are all more than double is the fee.”

Asked what the chances of Shamus Award’s fee staying at $33,000, Mithen quickly said: “None.”

He said they set the fee before Incentivise, Duais and Media Award won Group 1 races this year.

“Since we set his fee at Easter, he has had three individual Group, 1 winners,” he said.

“If you have one, you are kicking yourself a little and thought you might have left a little bit on the table.”

Mithen said he wasn’t entirely shocked that Shamus Award’s numbers compare favourably with Snitzel at this same stage of his career but was a little surprised that he was better than him.

“God help him if he is the horse that Snitzel has been over a long period of time – wouldn’t that be nice,” Mithen said.

Interestingly, Snitzel stood at $33,000 in his first season at stud in 2006.

*Excerpts courtesy of TDNAus

 

 

 

Crystal Bound ridden by Jye McNeil wins the Cap D'Antibes Stakes at Flemington Racecourse on September 11, 2021 in Flemington, Australia. (George Salpigtidis/Racing Photos)

After failing to make a significant impact on the racetrack, Crystalised looks like making up for it in the breeding barn with her three-year-old filly by Not A Single Doubt, generating plenty of noise in her three starts.
Crystal Bound demanded plenty of attention on debut at Moonee Valley in March when she blitzed her rivals by six lengths over 1000m
Starting at $11, there was little hype before the race but plenty after it.
At just her second start, the filly – trained by Ciaron Maher and David Eustace – was beaten less than a length in the Group 3 Percy Sykes Stakes (1200m).
Back last Saturday, after a 21-week spell, Crystal Bound again raced handy to take out the Listed Cap D’Antibes Stakes (1100m) at Flemington.
After parting with $1.3 million for Crystalised (Zabeel x Gin Player) as a yearling, Noorilim Park Thoroughbreds at Arcadia offered Crystal Bound at the 2020 Gold Coast yearling sold and was snapped up for $400,000 by Cameron Stott and Caulfield trainer Ciaron Maher who didn’t have to look far to fill the ownership page.
Noorilim Park’s Peter and Glen Carrick retained a share, as did Scott Williams, who bred Crystalised.
“She was impressive but a little bit underdone coming into the race,” Glen Carrick said.
“But she got the job done for us.”
He said it was definitely good to still have Crystalised (Zabeel x Gin Player), which has now produced three foals for three winners.
“We have had Crystalised since we bought her as a yearling for big money ($1.3 million), and now it’s good to see her progeny doing it on the track,” he said.
“We bought her off Scott Williams in New Zealand, and he took her to the Sydney sales, and he stayed in her for a 25 per cent share, and he is still continuing to breed with us.
“And we both stayed in Crystal Bound. “We retained a leg in her.
“She was one of the better yearlings we bred, but we had to sell, but we wanted to stay in as well, and I think we made the right choice.”
Carrick said Crystal bound would head to either the Danehill Stakes or the Thoroughbred Breeders Stakes at Caulfield against the fillies.
Crystalised has a filly by Impending, which will be either offered at next year’s Magic Million Gold Coast Yearling Sale or Melbourne Premier.
“She is clearly the best foal on the farm,” Carrick said.
“She is going to visit Farnan this week. It will be a close relation to Crystal Bound with the Not A Single Doubt line, so I think that works in the family.”
Crystalised slipped to the Autumn Sun after being served last October.
Carrick said they were mindful that they had to make the right stallion selection for Crystalised because of her size.
“You never know, that could have come out too big,” Carrick said of The Autumn Sun mating. She is a pretty big mare.”
With Crystalised being so big – she is pushing 17 hands; Carrick said it was important to match her with the right sized stallions.
“I think a few people thought she was going to throw a boat, but they didn’t say she was going to throw a fast boat, that’s for sure,” he said. “It’s a speed boat.”
Carrick said it was crucial with a big mare to make sure the stallion was the right size.
“You just hope it comes out perfect, and it did that time,” he said.
Carrick said that while it was tempting to retain Crystal Bound, it was also important to bring in funds to pay for all the costs.
Carrick said they had about 15 of their own broodmares and would foal down 90 for the season.
“It’s the busiest time of the year but the best time of the year,” he said.
He said they try to sell all of the foals they bred, which means they send their mares to what Carrick describes as the better stallions.
As well as Crystal Bound’s win, Crystal Dynasty (Tavistock), which is also out of Crystalised, won on Sunday at Donald.
The four-year-old mare is also trained by Maher/Eustace, while Stott and Noorilim Park Thoroughbreds are also in the big ownership group. Crystalised’s first foal, Queen of Ascot, is by Redoute’s Choice and is a Bairnsdale maiden winner that now races in South Australia.
“We also had a winner, Easy Single (Not A Single Doubt x Special Lover) at Swan Hill last Friday,” Carrick said.
The four-year-old was bred by Noorilim Park and purchased by Maher for $240,000 at the Magic Millions Gold Yearling Sale in 2019.
“We bred all three of those, and they are trained by Ciaron Maher, and he has done well for us,” Carrick said
Carrick said everything they breed is for sale – at the right price.
“We put a price on them, and if they sell, they sell,” he said.
“We usually put a fair price on them and don’t overprice them.”
Maher described Crystal Bound in his post-race interview as a very high-quality filly.
She’s got that beautiful big action,” he said.
“We took her to The Valley off one trial, and she obviously was very impressive the first time out.
“So we took a similar path this time around. She’s still a bit wintry in the coat, and that will really bring her on. That’s probably why she probably doesn’t look as refined as when they’ve been in work a bit longer.”
Maher said the “Sky’s the limit for her.”
Crystalised is a half-sister to Group 1 SAJC South Australian Derby and Group 1 Schweppes Oaks winner Zarita (Pentire), Group 2 winner Run Like The Wind (Pins) and Hong Kong sprinter/miler Joy And Fun (Cullen) which won 12 races.

Obfuscation ridden by Jordan Childs wins the Adroit Bendigo Maiden Plate at Bendigo Racecourse on September 03, 2021 in Bendigo, Australia. (Brett Holburt/Racing Photos)

As Laurie and John McCarthy gradually wind down operations at their Greta West Stud, they both took pleasure in witnessing a horse they bred give Darley stallion Holler his first win.

Obfuscation was bred by the brothers from a mare they bred – Hai Lil (Churchill Downs x Smooth as Silk) – which they bought back after retiring.
It didn’t surprise Laurie that the three-year-old provided Holler with his first winner at Bendigo last week.

“He was always a nice horse,” McCarthy said.

“The form around him in that first start was pretty strong, I think.
“Even the way he did it after being wide and everything. He has gone to the line pretty well. It was nice.”

In what turned out to be a little bit in reverse, Greta West Stud sold Obfuscation through Bucklee Farm’s draft at the 2020 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale to Blake Ryan Racing for $90,000.

Later that year, Ryan Racing sold the two-year-old colt at the Inglis Ready to Race Sale for $50,000 to Caulfield trainer Mick Price who trains the now three-year-old gelding in partnership with Mick Kent Jnr.

After finishing third on debut at Bendigo last month, the gelding returned to the same track 26 days later, scoring a relatively easy but impressive victory over 1300m as the $2.10 favourite.

McCarthy said the victory was also significant as it gave his Group 1 winning sire Holler (Commands x Shouts) his first winner as a stallion.

Greta West Stud bred Obfuscation from their mare Hai Lil (Churchill Downs x Smooth As Silk), which they sold for $60,000 at the 2011 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale to Bendigo trainer Allen Browell who retired in 2019.

The McCarthy brothers bought the mare back after she was retired from the racetrack with six wins – four of those at city level.

“Obfuscation was a cheap horse,” Laurie said.

“Blake Ryan loved him, and he wanted to ready to run him. He went through at Sydney and didn’t run down too badly either, but he only made $50,000, and Mick Price bought him.

“If you were paying fifty for him and he is educated and ready to run, he is a cheap horse for Mick Price but a dear horse for Blake at ninety.”

After they bought Hai Lil back, her first foal to Fighting Sun was born dead, and the mare was sent back to the stallion which produced Hai Sun. The now four-year-old mare, trained by Mitch Freedman, has had five starts for a win at Caulfield and a second and a third.

Hai Lil’s foal after Obfuscation was a colt by Toronado, which Lindsay Park Racing paid $200,000 for at this year’s Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

“He is named (Le Ferrari), and the Hayes’ really like him,” McCarthy said.
“She didn’t have one as she was late, but she is back in foal to Toronado. I bred two to Toronado in the first year and have bred to him every year so far.

“We got good money for a Toronado the year before and got $200,000 for a colt out of No Vanity.”

Hai Lil is booked to Darley’s Earthlight (Shamardal x Winters Moon) this breeding season.

“Earthlight was a terrific two-year-old and won five out of five,” McCarthy said.
“We tend to just stay in Victoria. I haven’t sent mares to the Hunter. I really wanted a proven horse, but proven horses are just too dear for me now.

“I was looking to spend around $20,000, but I ended settling on Earthlight, who I think is a high-quality horse. You would think he would have appeal.

“We are sending our other mare, No Vanity, to Hanseatic. He is 17 grand, and it’s not all about price, but there are not many horses under 20 grand to go to in Victoria, and then you jump up to 30-plus.”

McCarthy revealed that they are winding back their operations and last year was the first time in more than 40 years they did not stand a stallion at Greta West Stud, which is recognised as one of the oldest family-owned studs in Victoria.

Laurie and John’s father, Les and his wife Maureen established the stud in the 1960s.

Greta West Stud (Greta West)

McCarthy said that when he was at school, his father was standing Prince of Baden, which had Scamanda a winner of his first eight starts as a two-year-old and his first defeat was in the Golden Slipper and Staincross (GB).

“We had a stack of stallions, and Toy Pindarri was a terrific old horse that we had for years,” he said.

“But that era of the smaller breeders, that’s all gone.

“If it’s not going to make to a yearling sale somewhere, then no one wants to breed it. And those people who breed from themselves were our clients”.

“A lot of them are people who are in their seventies or eighties, and hence they don’t have the farm, and they don’t have the income and the horses to do it.

Times change and a lot of them take a five or 10 per cent in a syndicated horse, and that’s their exposure.”

Among Greta West Stud’s big roll call of stallions are two of their most recent sires – Master of Design and King of Prussia.

“Dad started standing stallions in the 1960s,” McCarthy said.

“I’ve been doing it for 40-odd years, and it’s time for a break, I reckon.

“We’ll keep one farm, and we’ll probably sell one farm.

“We are getting into our sixties, and there is no one to take it on, there are all different reasons, and it’s a good time to make a change, really. But we have had a really good couple of years.”

Greta West Stud comprises two farms, about a kilometre apart, and one is 280 acres and the other 300 acres.

He said the work doesn’t get any easier, and they have been foaling nothing under 50 mares “forever.”

“You are out there day and night, and it’s a year-round job, and once an upon a time you’d stand the stallions and nothing would go to a yearling sale, and the mares would come along, and you’d get the agistment and the service fee and out the gate,” McCarthy said.

“You would have horses all year round, but you wouldn’t do yearling sales, and they are now a thing of their own, and they never stop. You would get some downtime to a degree, and staff is harder to get, and everything is that much more commercial.”

McCarthy, 60, said his brother John, 61, wanted to stay on the older 280-acre farm where they grew up and sell the slightly bigger one which they have had for more than 35 years.

He said his father’s parents originally had the property around 1880 and 1890 when the Kelly Gang bushrangers roamed the area.

McCarthy said he bought a block of land in the older part of Geelong more than two years ago, and they built a new home, and it was only last Friday that he took possession of the keys to the house.

“Eventually, I’ll end up there,” he said.
“We’ll keep some of the mares.

“I have got three girls, and they are leaving and going off to uni and things like that, so it’s just a good time to make a change.”

McCarthy said that while he was sad about moving, he believes there will be plenty of positives with the move to Geelong with his wife Toni and their three daughters, Ella, Sophia and Ava.

Greta West Stud where the family have called home for decades (Greta West)

“We have had a lot of winners later, and that Free Of Debt which we bred won in Adelaide again the other day,” he said.

“We don’t have a large broodmare band and have only had half a dozen for quite a while, and we have cut it all back.

“We have had a couple of good years from our yearlings. It’s hard to get a horse by the right stallions, get them to x-ray and scope well and all those sorts of things.”

McCarthy said that if they stayed serious, money would have to be spent on the farm if they were to remain on a commercial basis, and they’d need to buy broodmares and already stopped with the stallions.

“As I said, there are a lot of things that say it’s a good time to have a change,” he said

McCarthy said his brother wouldn’t do much with the farm as it would be difficult without him receiving back-up.

“He doesn’t really have to do much, and you sort of think why put yourself through it, and some of them go forever until they finish, and then they drop off,” he said.

“We have worked pretty hard for a long time.

“He’ll run a few cattle and will probably have a few horses. Because we still have the farm, there is no reason why we can’t breed a few more foals and see what happens and how it works.

“We’ll just see how it goes as we go along.”

Widden Stud’s Adam Henry reckons life couldn’t get much better than what it was on Saturday.

“When you have a dynamic roster like the one assembled at Widden, days like these are bound to happen and it’s pleasing when they do,” he said.

Seven of Widden’s stallions produced 12 winners on the Australian racing calendar on Saturday and then the following day Hong Kong based David Hayes produced what many believe is a champion in waiting when Nervous Witness cruised to an eye-catching win on debut.

Unraced in Australia as Bill’s Kick, the son of Star Witness exceeded all the pre-race hype that the four-year-old had generated since trialling at Sha Tin.

And the action was pretty good closer to home for Widden Stud’s Victorian stallion, the Melbourne Cup winning Fiorente which produced Don’t Doubt Dory to win at Moonee Valley over 1600m, while Melody Man made it back to back wins at Morphettville when the gelding won over1950m.

Nicconi, which will stand his first season at Widden in Victoria, had four winners on Saturday, including champion sprinter Nature Strip which returned with a slashing win in the Group 3 Concorde at Randwick to justify his favouritism for The Everest. Jerry also won at Randwick, while Aston scored at Morphettville.

And the late Sebring’s name continued to live on when Superstorm won the Group 2 Feehan Stakes (1600m) at Moonee Valley.

Henry said it was great to see Fiorente get the double.

Star Witness will join Nicconi on debut at Widden Victoria.

“The addition of the two proven Group 1 stallions to Victorian roster proves that we are fair dinkum about the Victorian industry,” Henry said.

New boys Russian Camelot and Doubtland are proving popular and both will serve more than 140 mares.

Henry said the bookings to the stud’s 12 stallions indicated that more than 1000 mares will be served before the end of the season.

He said the mix of stallions, some at the start of their careers and others as proven performers at different stages of their careers, allowed the stud to cater for all breeders who wanted juvenile runners, sprinters, milers and middle distance horses.

And Henry said a proven stallion like Magnus had 119 winners last season and had a huge result at Melbourne Premier where his yearlings averaged more than $160,000.

He said Don’t Doubt Dory’s trainer Julien Welsh and connections have black type aspirations for the five-year-old which has won six races from 13 starts.

“There are plenty of stakes races around the carnival for him,” Henry said.

“He has certainly got the ability to win a good race and he wouldn’t have been wound up for the first up assignment. There is definitely a good race in him.

“Jake Stephens in South Australia has always had an opinion of Melody Man which won by three lengths. He has definitely got stakes ability as well.”

Henry said Fiorente was coming off a good season when he had five stakes performers as three-year-olds from just 38 runners.

He said he had a strong book this season and is coming off his second biggest crop of 88 live foals off his highest service fee of $27,500 in 2019.

Widden also now offers pre-training and a breaking service under the guidance of respected horseman, Matt Upton.

“It’s a hive of activity with horses working and mares coming into be covered,” Henry said.

With the return of the breaking and pre-training, Henry said Widden had pretty much had everything covered from conception to the racetrack.

“It really is a one stop shop,” he laughed.

To view the Widden Victorian roster please click here.

 

 

Mynumerouno after winning the Inglis 2022 Yearling Sales Series Plate at Moonee Valley Racecourse on September 04, 2021 in Moonee Ponds, Australia. (Pat Scala/Racing Photos)

First time breeder Mark Schiavello always considered there was some unfinished business when a mare he raced with friends had to be retired.

He figured that the mare – Splash of Moet (Dash For Cash x Storm Tossed) – would only be worth a modest amount of money after she bled at her final start in a flying handicap at Murray Bridge seven years ago.

Splash of Dash won four times for her Victorian owners.

“We raced this mare and we had a high opinion of her,” Schiavello said.

“It’s on the record that she bled twice and we probably felt as an ownership group that there was a little bit of unfinished business.

“We wanted to back her in and thankfully she is doing a job. Clearly it’s a long journey, but it’s very rewarding and it’s good fun.’”

Splash of Dash produced last Saturday’s Moonee Valley winner Mynumerouno which has had three wins and a third from four starts.

The three-year-old has won $168,550 in prize money and is being set for bigger things during the spring.

The gelding made his debut as a two-year-old at Swan Hill in a 975 metre maiden in June and started at $2.90 and won by two lengths.

Schiavello said Flemington trainer and former top jockey Nick Ryan gave a glowing report when he galloped the gelding before the debut run.

“Nick let him off the chain for the first time before his first start and he rang me and said he was going to send me something,” he said.

“He sent me the E-Trakka stats of the gallop and it was pretty impressive and he said if anything beats this, it’s going to win that race.

“He was pretty confident.”

Splash of Moet wasn’t the first horse Schiavello and his mates had raced, but they’d only had a few before her.

“Splash would have been the fourth or fifth horse we raced,” he said.

Schiavello said there had always been a core group of five or six that raced and bred from the mare but others had joined as owners and co-breeders along the way.

Splash of Moet’s first foal, Essoess (Choisir), is owned by the same group and has won two races for Newcastle trainer Mark Minervini.

There is a full brother to Mynumerouno and a colt by Rubick.

“The full brother will go to Nick,” Schiavello said.

“Her foals are typically on the small size. Mynumerouno is not a big horse, Essoess is not a big horse and the full brother to Mynumerouno is not big but is apparently a really nice horse.

“With the Rubick colt, we have bred an athlete and he is a really nice horse.

“We are more breed to race as opposed to sell. When you have 10 or so people in the ownership group and there is Super VOBIS and it is just such a good scheme and it just makes sense to race them.”

Schiavello said if the stars aligned then “maybe” they could offer one of the mare’s yearlings, especially if Mynumerouno won a Group race and then a sale could be considered.

“But not at the moment,” he said.

They paid $42,500 for Splash of Moet at the 2011 Adelaide Premier Yearling Sale. She started her career with Minervini when he trained at Morphettville, then the mare was transferred to Peter Moody before finishing her career with Lloyd Kennewell back in South Australia.

Schiavello concedes that mare would have probably fetched maybe $5000 to $10,000 as a broodmare so they ownership group decided to take a punt in the breeding game.

“We thought we’d chance our arm,” he said.

“What’s the worst thing that could happen when you’ve got 10 blokes so it’s sort of manageable. It’s like a golf membership and it’s entertainment.”

Schiavello said that like everyone else, when your dad’s a punter, you follow racing as a kid and fall in love with the game and then you come in touch with liked minded work colleagues.

“You start talking about ownership and you dabble with syndicates and then you form enough people to do it on your own,” he said.

“My dad was and still is a punter and it was through that me and my brothers loved it and the rest is history. My father never owned horses.”

While Splash of Moet has produced four colts, Schiavello said it would be ideal to get a filly from her.

“We’d like to keep the family going and if we could get a filly we’d most likely bred from her,” he said.

Schiavello hasn’t ruled out buying another broodmare with his mates to continue their breeding venture and says they’d bid on a few but missed out.

Splash of Moet’s foals are now born and raised on Dean and Phoebe Grass’ Gippsland Bloodstock property at Garfield.

Unfortunately the mare missed last season to Rosemont Stud stallion Shamus Award which was particularly disappointing for Schiavello after watching the success of Mynumerouno.

“It was a bummer because that stallion is flying,” he said.

“It would have been nice expecting a foal from him but not to be.

“She will go to Spirit of Boom and this will probably be the last time she’ll go interstate as we don’t want to travel with her when she has a foal at foot.

“So with her being empty this season we thought we’d go to him as he is half decent value. His two-year-olds sold really well at last year’s sale and if he can spike off that he might be back to 50 or 60 odd grand.”

And for trainer Nick Ryan, it was a big day at Moonee Valley last Saturday.

As well as Mynumerouno winning, Ryan trained the Victorian bred Express Pass, which is by Larneuk’s new stallion Wandjina, to victory in the first running of the Chautauqua Stakes (1200m).

“He had his foot on the till to do something like that,” Ryan said.

“He had the race run to suit and he showed what he could do. He has been competitive in that grade of race before and he has got the ability but needed a bit of luck.

“He showed what he could really do.”

Ryan said there were plenty of race options, but the gelding got 12 points from the handicapper for the victory and he’s now a 97-rater.

“They didn’t miss him but it was a dominate win,” he said.

“But it opens some doors for him and he’ll be able to get a run in some better races. He has got the ability to win a good race.”

Express Pass was sold through Blue Gum Farm’s draft for $38,000 at the 2018 Melbourne VOBIS Gold Yearling Sale after being passed in on a $60,000 reserve at Melbourne Premier. The five-year-old has now won $326,475.

Ryan described Mynumerouno as a nice, progressive horse and said Schiavello and is ownership group had been big supporters of the stable.

Schiavello paid $70,000 for Regardsmaree (So You Think x Rossa Mia) at the 2018 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale. The five-year-old mare, which has a big ownership group including Schiavello’s brother David, has won six races and more than $340,000 in prizemoney. The mare holds a nomination for the Cox Plate.

“I have trained a lot of winners for them now and they are very good owners,” Ryan said.

“They bought another So You Think yearling at Melbourne Premier this year.”

Ryan said Mynumerouno would be set for the Group 3 Blue Sapphire (1200m) at Caulfield on October 13 and then the Group 1 Coolmore Stud Stakes (1200m) at Flemington on Derby Day.

 

 

 

 

Obfuscation ridden by Jordan Childs wins the Adroit Bendigo Maiden Plate at Bendigo Racecourse on September 03, 2021 in Bendigo, Australia. (Brett Holburt/Racing Photos)

As Laurie and John McCarthy gradually wind down operations at their Greta West Stud, they both took pleasure in witnessing a horse they bred give Darley stallion Holler his first win.

Obfuscation was bred by the brothers from a mare they bred – Hai Lil (Churchill Downs x Smooth as Silk) – which they bought back after being retired.

It didn’t surprise Laurie that the three-year-old provided Holler with his first winner at Bendigo last week

“He was always a nice horse,” McCarthy said.

“The form around him in that first start was pretty strong, I think.

“Even the way he did it after being wide and everything. He has gone to the line pretty well. It was nice.”

In what turned out to be a little bit in reverse, Greta West Stud sold Obfuscation through Bucklee Farm’s draft at the 2020 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale to Blake Ryan Racing for $90,000.

Later that year, Ryan Racing sold the two-year-old colt at the Inglis Ready to Race Sale for $50,000 to Caulfield trainer Mick Price who trains the now three-year-old gelding in partnership with Mick Kent Jnr.

After finishing third on debut at Bendigo last month, the gelding returned to the same track 26 days later, scoring a relatively easy but impressive victory over 1300m as the $2.10 favourite.

McCarthy said the victory was also significant as it gave his Group 1 winning sire Holler (Commands x Shouts) his first winner as a stallion.

Greta West Stud bred Obfuscation from their mare Hai Lil (Churchill Downs x Smooth As Silk) which they sold for $60,000 at the 2011 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale to Bendigo trainer Allen Browell who retired in 2019.

The McCarthy brothers bought the mare back after she was retired from the racetrack with six wins – four of those at city level.

“Obfuscation was a cheap horse,” Laurie said.

“Blake Ryan loved him and he wanted to ready to run him and he went through at Sydney and didn’t run down too badly either but he only made $50,000 and Mick Price bought him.

“If you were paying fifty for him and he is educated and ready to run he is a cheap horse for Mick Price but a dear horse for Blake at ninety”

After they bought Hai Lil back, her first foal to Fighting Sun was born dead and the mare was sent back to the stallion which produced Hai Sun. The now four-year-old mare, trained by Mitch Freedman, has had five starts for a win at Caulfield and a second and a third.

Hai Lil’s foal after Obfuscation was a colt by Toronado which Lindsay Park Racing paid $200,000 for at this year’s Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

“He is named (Le Ferrari) and the Hayes’ really like him,” McCarthy said.

“She didn’t have one as she was late but she is back in foal to Toronado. I bred two to Toronado in the first year and have bred to him every year so far.

“We got good money for a Toronado the year before and got $200,000 for a colt out of No Vanity.”

Hai Lil is booked to Darley’s Earthlight (Shamardal x Winters Moon) this breeding season.

“Earthlight was a terrific two-year-old and won five out of five,” McCarthy said.

“We tend to just stay in Victoria and I haven’t sent mares to the Hunter. I really wanted a proven horse but proven horses are just too dear for me now.

“I was looking to spend around $20,000 and Nicconi and Magnus are the proven horses but I ended settling on Earthlight who I think is a high quality horse. You would think he would have appeal.

“We are sending our other mare, No Vanity, to Hanseatic. He is 17 grand and it’s not all about price but there are not many horses under 20 grand to go to in Victoria and then you jump up to 30-plus.”

McCarthy revealed that they are winding back their operations and last year was the first time in more than 40 years they did not stand a stallion at Greta West Stud which is recognised as one of the oldest family owned studs in Victoria.

Laurie and John’s father, Les and his wife Maureen, established the stud in the 1960s.

McCarthy said that when he was at school his father was standing Prince of Baden, which had Scamanda a winner of his first eight starts as a two-year-old and his first defeat was in the Golden Slipper, and Staincross (GB).

“We had a stack of stallions and Toy Pindarri was a terrific old horse that we had for years,” he said.

“But that era of the smaller breeders, that’s all gone.

“If it’s not going to make to a yearling sale somewhere then no one wants to breed it. And those people who breed from themselves were our clients”.

“A lot of them are people who are in their seventies or eighties and hence they don’t have the farm and they don’t have the income and the horses to do it. Times change and a lot of them take a five or 10 per cent in a syndicated horse and that’s their exposure.”

Among Greta West Stud’s big roll call of stallions are two of their most recent sires – Master of Design and King of Prussia.

“Dad started standing stallions in the 1960s,” McCarthy said.

“I’ve been doing it for 40-odd years and it’s time for a break I reckon.

“We’ll keep one farm and we’ll probably sell one farm.

“We are getting into our sixties and there is no one to take it on, there are all different reasons and it’s a good time to make a change really. But we have had a really good couple of years.”

Greta West Stud comprises two farms, about a kilometre apart, and one is 280 acres and the other 300 acres.

He said the work doesn’t get any easier and they been foaling nothing under 50 mares “forever.”

“You are out there day and night and it’s year round and once a upon a time you’d stand the stallions and nothing would go to a yearling sale and the mares would come along and you’d get the agistment and the service fee and out the gate,” McCarthy said.

“You would have horses all year round but you wouldn’t do yearling sales and they are now a thing of their own and they never stop. You would get some down time to a degree and staff is harder to get and everything is that much more commercial.”

McCarthy, 60, said his brother John, 61, wanted to stay on the older 280 acre farm where they grew up and sell the slightly bigger one which they have had for more than 35 years.

He said his father’s parents originally had the property around 1880 and 1890 when the Kelly Gang bushrangers roamed the area.

McCarthy said he bought a block of land in the older part of Geelong more than two years ago and they built a new home and it was only last Friday that he took possession of the keys to the house.

“Eventually I’ll end up there,” he said.

“We’ll keep some of the mares.

“I have got three girls and they are leaving and going off to uni and things like that so it’s just a good time to make a change.”

McCarthy said that while he was sad about moving, he believes there will be plenty of positives with the move to Geelong with his wife Toni and their three daughters, Ella, Sophia and Ava.

“We have had a lot of winners later and that Free Of Debt which we bred won in Adelaide again the other day,” he said.

“We don’t have a large broodmare band and have only had half a dozen for quite a while and we have cut it all back.

“We have had a couple of good years from our yearlings. It’s hard to get a horse by the right stallions, get them to x-ray and scope well and all those sort of things.”

McCarthy said that if they stayed serious money would have to be spent on the farm if they were to remain on a commercial basis and they’d need to buy broodmares and already stopped with the stallions.

“As I said there are a lot of things that say it’s a good time to have a change,” he said

McCarthy said his brother wouldn’t do much with the farm as it would be difficult without him receiving back-up.

“He doesn’t really have to do much and you sort of think why put yourself through it and some of them go forever until they finish and then they drop off,” he said.

“We have worked pretty hard for a long time.

“He’ll run a few cattle and will probably have a few horses. Because we still have the farm there is no reason why we can’t breed a few more foals and see what happens and how it works.

“We’ll just see how it goes as we go along.”

 

 

 

 

Anthony and Sam Freedman won the war in the Listed Atlantic Jewel S. with Zouzarella (Zoustar) at Moonee Valley where little went to plan for her more fancied stablemate.

Zouzarella remained unbeaten and furthered her G1 Thousand Guineas claims with another sterling performance, but barnmate and race favourite Argentia (Frankel {GB}) was out of luck and trailed in eighth.

The Soft 6 underfoot conditions didn’t bother the winner, who had showed she was on her way to higher honours with her debut victory on the course a fortnight ago when she accounted for the two-time winner Zapateo (Brazen Beau).

Zouzarella put up a visually impressive display | Image courtesy of Bronwen Healy

“She’s handled wet ground at home and in her trials. She is a big-framed filly who enjoys room so that she can go through her gears,” Sam Freedman said.

Zouzarella raced back in the body of the field and off the fence before in-form rider Brett Prebble stoked her up 800 metres from home.

She wound up powerfully and picked off her rivals to go to the post with 2l to spare on Larkspur Run (Shamardal {USA}) with Literary Magnate (Written Tycoon) third.

“She’ll probably head to the Listed Jim Moloney S. and then on to the Thousand Guineas after that. It’s a big thanks to Cambridge Stud for sending us such a beautiful filly,” Freedman said.

“She’ll probably head to the Listed Jim Moloney S. and then on to the Thousand Guineas after that.” – Sam Freedman

Zouzarella was purchased by Brendan and Jo Lindsay at the Magic Millions Gold Coast Yearling Sale out of Glastonbury Farm’s draft for $250,000. She is a daughter of the six-time winner Zazparella (Al Maher).

She is a sister to the multiple winner and Group performer Almachino (Al Maher) and the successful extended European family of the multiple Group 1 winner and Champion Sire Blushing Groom (Fr), G1 Irish Oaks winner Shawanda (Ire) (Sinndar {Ire}) and the G1 Italian Oaks winner Zabarella (Ity) (Clouet {Ity}).

Zouzarella pictured as a yearling

Zouzarella’s victory continued a good start to the new season for Cambridge Stud, whose colours have also recently been carried to victory earlier this week by Vantina (Choisir) and Funny Girl (Showcasing {GB}) at Cambridge.

Zouzarella’s stablemate Argentia was an impressive winner on debut at Flemington last season and while there were pre-race concerns about her handling the rain-affected track at Moonee Valley, she didn’t get to show how effective she may have been.

“She’s a good filly, but she didn’t look that comfortable and was off the bit and then she was tightened for room on the turn. She will bounce back for sure,” Freedman said.

Argentia is also on a path toward the G1 Thousand Guineas and, despite her defeat, remains an $8 co-favourite with Heresy (Street Boss {USA}) and Zouzarella is at $8.50.

Planning matings is a year-round process for the team at Two Bays and despite lockdowns putting a damper on physical parades, they are confident in having made the right decisions without seeing a large portion of stallions in the flesh.

“It makes things more difficult but the footage and video parades that the stallion farms are doing these days is incredible and you’re able to get quite a good gauge,” Carlile told TDN AusNZ.

Rob Carlile

“And with the internet, you’re also able to go all the way back to their yearling parades. So, there’s a lot more faith with the video system now and we’ve been able to use that with our stallion selections.

“However, we’ve also talked to the people who have been able to see them (stallions) and when they get ticked off by a few good judges you’re happy to follow them.”

“The video parades that the stallion farms are doing these days is incredible and you’re able to get quite a good gauge.” – Rob Carlile

The boutique Mornington Peninsula-based nursery stakes claim to a plethora of well-performed gallopers since its inception in 2012 and they will be hoping its third time lucky for the proven producer, Alcatraz (Fastnet Rock), after the dam of 2019 G1 JJ Atkins S. runner-up Kubrick (Shooting To Win) missed to top-end stallions Justify (USA) and Written Tycoon at her last two attempts respectively.

Alcatraz was covered by Newgate Farm’s burgeoning sire Deep Field on the opening day of this breeding season. The son of Northern Meteor is a full brother to Kubrick’s sire Shooting To Win.

Deep Field | Standing at Newgate Farm

“She’s (Alcatraz) starting to put a few ducks on the board but once they’re up there in the Hunter (Valley) and out of our hands we put all our trust in the people taking care of them,” Carlile said.

“We can cross our fingers and toes but at the end of the day they’re not robots and you can’t get them to do something they don’t want to do.

“Her 3-year-old filly (Bundle Of Fun (Written Tycoon)) was meant to have her first start the other week and was scratched due to a wide barrier but the Patrick Payne-stable are confident in her ability. Her 2-year-old by Written Tycoon is now in the (Chris) Waller system under the Coolmore care.

“So, hopefully, we’ve given her another good chance through Deep Field as the family clicks, there’s the line through Fairy King Prawn, Cosmic Endeavour also being by Northern Meteor and Shooting To Win being Deep Field’s full brother.”

Loading Zone (Street Sense {USA}), the dam of dual Group 3 winner Military Zone (Epaulette), will head to Widden Stud’s debut sire Anders after missing to Darley’s exciting shuttle sire Blue Point (Ire) last season.

A half-sister to Listed winners Hesitates (Commands) and Super Lacuna (Grand Lodge {USA}), Loading Zone had a colt by Russian Revolution knocked down for $150,000 at this year’s Inglis Premier Yearling Sale.

Russian Revolution x Loading Zone colt, sold for $150,000 at the Inglis Premier Sale

“She had an American Pharoah filly last year and sending her to Blue Point was a throw at the stumps right at the end of the season,” Carlile said.

“This year she will get a nice and early cover by Anders as she needs a good topped horse. We haven’t been able to see him ourselves, but he was an expensive yearling and a very fast horse himself and the sireline is kicking.

“He was also a physical match that suited her and with the speed, in her family, we thought we could recapture that through Anders, as she’s basically a carrier that throws pretty much whatever the stallion is.”

Shuttle season

Edge Away (Hinchinbrook), a half-sister to $1 million 2021 Magic Millions Gold Coast National Broodmare Sale purchase Jedastar (I Am Invincible) and dual Group 3 placegetter Rulership (I Am Invincible), will return to Spendthrift Farm’s Omaha Beach (USA) after foaling a quality filly by the dual Group 1 winner in recent weeks.

Omaha Beach (USA) | Standing at Spendthrift Australia

“We were very, very impressed by the Omaha Beach filly she (Edge Away) left us this year, she’s two weeks old and we couldn’t be happier,” Carlile said. “Omaha Beach was a good racehorse who just suits her (Edge Away) physically, as he’s got that bit more leg and she’s not a very big mare.

“He’s got the leg and she’s got the strength. So, hopefully putting the two together gives us a nice product.”

“We were very, very impressed by the Omaha Beach filly she (Edge Away) left us this year, she’s two weeks old and we couldn’t be happier.” – Rob Carlile

New Zealand Group 3-placed juvenile Platinum Mam’selle (Fighting Sun), will head to Swettenham Stud’s rising shuttle sire Toronado (Ire) for her third individual cover after her weanling filly by Tavistock (NZ) sold for $80,000 at this year’s Inglis Great Southern Sale.

She is currently carrying a foal by young Coolmore sire Yes Yes Yes.

“This year we have a lot more mares staying at home in Victoria than we have in the past,” Carlile said. “We’re only sending five mares up to NSW as the Victorian stallion farms have really stepped their game up and we like to support the likes of Swettenham, and Toronado who is doing a great job.

“She (Platinum Mam’selle) was a very tough 2-year-old who ran a lot early and with a mating like Toronado we know that if the foal doesn’t come up early, it’ll come on as a 3-year-old.”

The right direction

Two Bays will send three mares to Blue Point at Darley this season, Excelsior Island (Exceed And Excel), Spin Me A Kiss (USA) (Hard Spun {USA}) and Clear For Take Off (GB) (Solider Hollow {GB}).

“We’ve gone pretty hard on Blue Point, we sent four mares from the farm to him last year, as he’s just a horse you can’t go past, he’s a beautiful-looking horse and I don’t think too many people could fault him,” Carlile said.

“Blue Point was a superb racehorse himself, the only horse to win three Group 1 sprints at Royal Ascot and that Shamardal sireline just gets better with age too, he (Shamardal) had three Group 1-winning colts last year in the UK alone, it’s a pretty mean feat.

“By all reports from the UK, his (Blue Point’s) stock on the ground are impressing a lot of people and from what I’ve heard over here they are saying their best foals are by Blue Point. So, it’s a pretty exciting time for anyone in Australia who has tapped into that sireline through either Blue Point or Earthlight.”

“Blue Point was a superb racehorse himself, the only horse to win three Group 1 sprints at Royal Ascot and that Shamardal sireline just gets better with age too.” – Rob Carlile

Excelsior Island, a half-sister to G1 ARC Diamond S. winner Warhorse (NZ) (General Nediym), has a yearling filly on the ground by Justify and is only a matter of weeks away from foaling to Blue Point.

“We’re really happy with the Justify filly, she’s a good first foal for her (Excelsior Island), she has lots of strength and is a bit sharper than the Justify’s I have seen at previous weanling sales,” Carlile said.

“So, hopefully, the first Blue Point foal that she produces in the next couple of weeks is a good one and we look like geniuses this second time around.”

Spin Me A Kiss, a US$40,000 (AU$53,821) 2020 Keenland January Horses Of All Ages Sale purchase by Pinkhook Bloodstock, recently foaled a filly by Brazen Beau in her first attempt at stud.

“Dave Mee (Pinhook Bloodstock), who we’ve done some business with in the past, suggested her and we were happy to take this dual stakes-placed mare on his recommendation, as she was a good physical,” Carlile said. “Her Brazen Beau filly is really nice and a quality first foal for the mare, and Blue Point should suit her really well.”

Blue Point (Ire) | Standing at Darley

Fellow international import Clear For Take Off has been given every chance to get into foal after missing to Justify last season in her first attempt at stud.

A German Group 3 placegetter who won three races between 1400 and 2200 metres, Clear For Take Off was purchased by Matthew Becker’s Group 1 Bloodstock for €130,000 (AU$208,546) at the 2019 Arqana December Breeding Stock Sale.

She is out of dual Listed winner Chantra (Ger) (Lando {Ger}). She is also a half-sister to German Group 3 winner and three-time Italian Group 1 placegetter Calyxa (GB) (Pivotal {GB}).

“I don’t think she acclimatised in time last year after coming out and she really looks the picture now,” Carlile said. “She was covered by Blue Point on September 1 and fingers crossed everything goes well and she gets a nice first foal in a year’s time.”

“Blue Point should suit her well as if you look back to Shamardal he was a (G1) French 2000 Guineas winner and she just needs a good-sized, strong horse over her as she’s a lightly framed British-bred mare.”

The farm’s Antique

It wouldn’t be complete without mentioning Antique (Metal Storm {Fr}), the grandam of multiple Group 1 winner Arcadia Queen (Pierro), G1 Railway S. winner Regal Power (Pierro) and G2 Western Australian Derby winners Arcadia Dream (Pierro) and Action (Pierro).

The matriarch of Bob Peters’ famed family was purchased by Two Bays and Sheamus Mills Bloodstock (FBAA) for $45,000 at the 2015 Inglis Sydney Weanling and Broodmare Sale.

The 22-year-old has produced Arcadia Power (Pride Of Dubai), Big Apple (Manhattan Rain) and a colt by Toronado since joining the Two Bays broodmare band.

She is expected to foal for the 13th time in the coming weeks and is carrying the progeny of Manhattan Rain.

“It will be a day-by-day proposition with her and if she tells us that she can handle another one we will think about it but if she doesn’t, we will pull up stumps and she can be a nanny for the rest of her life,” Carlile said.

“If we do go around with her again, we will have a throw at the stumps with Impending as we hold a breeding right in him and while he was a sprinter, he is by a miler to 2000-metre horse (Lonhro) out of a miler herself (Mnemosyne).”

Mare
Booked To
2021 Foal
2020 Foal
2019 Foal
Alcatraz Deep Field Written Tycoon
Loading Zone Anders American Pharoah Russian Revolution
Edge Away Omaha Beach Omaha Beach Winning Rupert
Platinum Mam’selle Toronado Yes Yes Yes Tavistock
Excelsior Island Blue Point Blue Point Justify
Spin Me A Kiss Blue Point Brazen Beau
Clear For Take Off Blue Point
Antique TBC Manhattan Rain Toronado

Table of some of Two Bay Farm’s matings for 2021

Article Courtesy of TDN.

The colts’ fund, spearheaded by Rosemont Stud and involving a host of other Victorian breeders, including Noorilim Park, Musk Creek, Iskander Racing and Glentree Racing, has 11 named horses heading into their 2-year-old seasons and those names are amongst the most famous to wear the ‘Big V’ Victorian guernsey.

Dunstall (I Am Invincible) and Brereton (Zoustar) are named after Hawthorn’s dominant key forward-pairing of the 1980s and early 1990s, Daicos is a Capitalist colt carrying the moniker of the mercurial Collingwood forward, while Whitten (Written Tycoon) is named after one of the greatest Victorian football figures of all time, ‘Mr Football’, Ted Whitten.

Tom Hafey, one of the most revered coaches in VFL history, has an I Am Invincible colt in his name, while brilliant Geelong rover of the 1960s, Bill Goggin, is honoured by a Written Tycoon colt. Rosemont’s close proximity to Geelong is also reflected in the naming of Bews (I Am Invincible), a colt who shares his name with one-time Cats skipper and All-Australian defender, Andrew Bews.

Hafey as a yearling

Brownlow medallist Bernie Quinlan, who held the nickname Superboot, and kicked 817 goals in a 366-game career for Footscray and Fitzroy, has an I Am Invincible colt named after him, while Neitz (Brazen Beau) carries the name of former Melbourne captain David Neitz.

Then there is the iconic Carlton defensive duo Stephen Silvagni and Bruce Doull, who have colts by Siyouni (Fr) and Snitzel named in their honour.

“Those who the horses have been named after have, at one stage, worn the famous ‘Big V’ in their careers.” – Anthony Mithen

The idea was sparked from a conversation at Rosemont a few months ago, where principal Anthony Mithen and his team were thinking about a theme they could follow with the Victorian Alliance purchases.

“It’s been quite a fun exercise,” Mithen said. “Myself, Ryan (McEvoy), Ted (Mithen) and Nige (Austin) had a bit of a spitball session over a beer, thinking about what are we going to do about naming these colts.

Anthony Mithen | Image courtesy of Inglis

“I thought we should probably try and find a Victorian theme for the names. Given we all love footy, what about for the first batch, let’s kick off with a naming theme around our next great passion, which is Aussie Rules. So we named them after famous ‘Big V’ footballers.”

State Of Origin football was a huge part of Australian Rules until the establishment of the AFL from an expanded VFL in the 1990s. Those who the horses have been named after have, at one stage, worn the famous ‘Big V’ in their careers.

“We put the idea to the partners in the Alliance and they liked the idea and gave us the license to work our way with Racing Australia to come up with names that were available,” Mithen said.

That wasn’t an easy task with several names unavailable or rejected. Among them was Skilton, after triple Brownlow Medallist Bob Skilton, who had a horse named after him by Rod Douglas a week before Mithen and his team spoke to Racing Australia, while there was no luck naming a horse Lockett, after record-breaking goalkicker Tony Lockett.

“We would have loved to have named a horse after Plugger,” Mithen said.

What’s in a name?

Matching the available names to the horses was the next part of the journey, with a few of them finding natural fits.

“We looked up Tommy Hafey’s Wikipedia page and he was described as the benchmark of elite coaching in the ’70s and ’80s. T-shirt Tommy gets a good run there with the I Am Invincible-Beat The Benchmark colt named after him,” Mithen said.

Doull, known as The Flying Doormat, was a legendary player for Carlton, playing 356 games and winning four premierships for the Blues. He was also known for his reticence with the media and when the $1.2 million colt by Snitzel out of Bulbula (Shamardal {USA}) ended up at Anthony and Sam Freedman’s stable, Mithen felt the name had particular relevance.

Doull as a yearling

“Anthony is a bit of a recalcitrant when it comes to speaking with the media and the like, so it’s a bit of a nod to Anthony and his grumpiness. I reckon it’s more than appropriate,” he said.

Among the former footballers to already know that he has a horse named after him is Neitz, who Mithen was able to contact through mutual friend, Russell Robertson.

“He was on TV doing a promo with him and I texted Russell to get him to tell Neita we have named a horse after him. Robbo came back and said he was quite delighted about that,” he said.

“Hopefully there are one or two that do the names justice and there is a proud footballer looking on from the grandstands at some stage, doffing their cap to us.” – Anthony Mithen

“Hopefully there are one or two that do the names justice and there is a proud footballer looking on from the grandstands at some stage, doffing their cap to us.”

To the track

With the names in place, the challenge is now to get the horses to the racetrack. The 11 named colts are with eight different trainers, with at least three of them showing positive early signs.

“There’s a couple that will make early trials, and hopefully the early stakes races in Sydney and Melbourne. That’s encouraging,” Mithen said.

“The Precious Lorraine colt by I Am Invincible, Quinlan, is showing signs with Gai and Adrian that he wants to get to something competitive early. Whether that’s a trial or two, or through to one of those early 2-year-old races in Sydney, we will see.

“There’s a couple that will make early trials, and hopefully the early stakes races in Sydney and Melbourne.” – Anthony Mithen

“We’ve actually got a new Irish lady at the farm called Lorraine, and given the connection with the name and that colt, Quinlan, she’s been dubbed Superboot around the farm. She’s got no idea why that is that case, but she likes it.”

Hafey, who is being prepared by Ciaron Maher and David Eustace, is another colt making bold progress towards a possible appearance in the early 2-year-old races.

Brereton, the Zoustar colt out of Fuddle Dee Duddle (Red Ransom {USA}), which cost $1 million through the Widden Stud draft at the Magic Millions Gold Coast Yearling Sale, had a jump-out for his trainer Peter Moody earlier this month.

Brereton as a yearling

The Victorian Alliance-owned horses will all carry a variation of the Rosemont red and white silks when they do get to the racetrack.

“It will be the Rosemont colours with a navy blue armband and the Victorian alliance logo sitting on the bicep,” Mithen said.

The ‘footy’ theme is not guaranteed to continue to future crops of colts purchased by the Alliance, with Mithen saying they would keep an open mind.

“We’ve got to come up with another theme for next year, whether it be great Victorian rivers, buildings or landmarks; we will see,” he said.

Horse
Breeding
Footballer
Trainer
Cost
Sale
Vendor
Dunstall I Am Invincible x Petition (Foxwedge) Jason Dunstall – 269 games, 3 for Victoria TBC $950,000 MM Gold Coast Coolmore Stud
Brereton Zoustar x Fuddle Dee Duddle (Red Ransom) Dermott Brereton – 211 games, 9 for Victoria Peter Moody $1,000,000 MM Gold Coast Widden Stud
Whitten Written Tycoon x Jester’s Girl (Commands) Ted Whitten – 321 games, 29 for Victoria Mick Price and Michael Kent Jnr $300,000 MM Gold Coast Edinburgh Park
Bews I Am Invincible x Overstep (Exceed And Excel) Andrew Bews – 282 games, 12 for Victoria Mick Price and Michael Kent Jnr $400,000 MM Gold Coast Yarraman Park
Quinlan I Am Invincible x Precious Lorraine (Encosta de Lago) Bernie Quinlan – 366 games, 4 for Victoria Gai Waterhouse and Adrian Bott $600,000 MM Gold Coast Baramul Stud
Daicos Capitalist x Silk Sheets (Exceed And Excel) Peter Daicos – 250 games, 5 for Victoria Peter and Paul Snowden $350,000 MM Gold Coast Attunga Stud
Goggin Written Tycoon x Shaaheq (Redoute’s Choice) Bill Goggin – 248 games, 14 for Victoria Danny O’Brien $200,000 Inglis Easter Yarraman Park
Hafey I Am Invincible x Beat The Benchmark (Speightstown) Tom Hafey – 67 games, 522 as coach Ciaron Maher and David Eustace $525,000 Inglis Easter Coolmore Stud
Doull Snitzel x Bulbula (Shamardal) Bruce Doull – 356 games, Victorian representative Anthony and Sam Freedman $1,200,000 Inglis Easter Yarraman Park
Neitz Brazen Beau x Balaclava Lady (Charge Forward) David Neitz – 306 games, 2 for Victoria Gai Waterhouse and Adrian Bott $200,000 Inglis Melbourne Premier Shadow Hill
Silvagni Siyouni x Bouquet de Flores (Streey Cry) Stephen Silvagni – 312 games, 7 for Victoria John O’Shea $520,000 Inglis Melbourne Premier Yulong

Table: The Victorian Alliance 2-year-olds

Article Courtesy of TDN.

(Racing Photos)

Spring has truly sprung with the start of the season appearing on our doorstep today.

Without a doubt it is the favourite time for most in our industry. Warmer weather, longer days and most importantly foals arriving!

TBV are proud to launch our annual foal gallery and we would like to thank our sponsors, TAB, Racing Victoria, Kentucky Equine Research & Barastoc for being proud supporters of our foal gallery.

This year we will be looking for photos for the following categories:

  • Most Liked – A Super VOBIS Nomination to the value of $1980, for the “Most Liked” photo across the TBV Social media pages (Facebook, Instagram & Twitter) courtesy of Racing Victoria.
  • Three Best photos of foals sired by Victorian sires – Three Kentucky Equine/ Barastoc vouchers worth $100 each for the three best photos of foals sired by Victorian sires, courtesy of KER/Barastoc.
  • The two most unique photos – Two TAB betting vouchers worth $100 each awarded to the two most unique photos, courtesy of TAB.

You can enter your submissions by email to tbv@racingvictoria.net.au

Be sure to share the TBV post on your own social media accounts and tag our social media accounts. Entries will be taken up until 30 November 2021.

To ensure you don’t miss any of the cuteness make sure you are following TBV on our social media accounts on Instagram (@vic_breeders), Twitter (@vicbreeders) or our Facebook page (@ThoroughbredBreedersVictoria).

You can view the terms and conditions of the foal gallery by clicking here.

The two former champions of the turf have the closest of ties to the Makybe operation. Relatives and offspring of the star duo continue to feature in the 2021 mating plans of the Gnarwarre farm.

Makybe Diva was raced by Santic, and following a glittering career that netted an unprecedented three G1 Melbourne Cup victories and success in the G1 Cox Plate she returned home for a breeding career.

Six of her eight foals that raced were winners and after producing a filly in 2019 to More Than Ready (USA), which has been retained, she was retired and remains in good health at Makybe.

“Pre-COVID we had the hope of putting her back in the public eye, she looks as good as she ever did and still a big, powerful mare,” Stud Manager Joe Murray said.

More Than Ready (USA) | Standing at WinStar Farm

“There was no reason physically to retire her (Makybe Diva), but Tony wanted to get her back out at Flemington and let people get up close and personal with her.

“There was no reason physically to retire her (Makybe Diva), but Tony wanted to get her back out at Flemington and let people get up close and personal with her.” – Joe Murray

“That obviously went pot when COVID hit. Last year, we did get her to Flemington on Melbourne Cup Day when there was nobody there which was a bit sad, but we did retire her for that purpose and we will keep trying to get her to the public.

“Once this is all behind us, we will hopefully be able to get her back to the races a bit more, ideally at Flemington which is her second home. She’s rugged up at the moment and running around with the other mares and when you get the rug off her she looks really good.”

Makybe Diva’s half-sister Valkyrie Diva (Jade Robbery {USA}) won the G3 Tesio S. and is a prized current member of the broodmare band as the dam of stakes winners Wonder KidJolly Banner (HK) (Lonhro), Wales (Redoute’s Choice) and C’Est Beau La Vie (Bernardini {USA}).

“She’s empty and is getting on in years, but her Zoustar yearling is an absolute cracker and has everything we wanted when we picked that mating,” Murray said.

“We’re going to keep her in Victoria and she will go to Toronado. She has nothing left to prove as a broodmare and Toronado is doing very well and is a versatile stallion. She can throw precocious horses and that mating matches up very well.”

It’s a done deal

La Dolce Diva (Fusaichi Pegasus {USA}) is a daughter of Makybe Diva and has left a stakes performer in Touch Of Mink (Not A Single Doubt). She produced a colt last year by Dundeel (NZ) and is in foal to Royal Meeting (Ire).

“Her Dundeel yearling is a cracker and the main reason she is going back to Dundeel. Some of early foals were big and a smaller mating suits her,” Murray said.

Last Bling is a winning daughter of Valkyrie Diva by Starspangledbanner and her maiden serve last year was to Toronado (Ire).

“We didn’t get to see the best of her as she always felt her knees a bit. She’s a beautiful-looking mare and she’s booked to Deep Field.” Murray said.

“We are looking at the speed there and we bred Quantum Mechanic who is by Deep Field and was third in the Group 1 (Queen of the Turf S.) so we’ve done well breeding to him.”

Star graduate

Starspangledbanner was sold by Makybe at the Inglis Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale for $120,000 and went on to domestic as well as international fame and fortune with Group 1 wins in the Oakleigh Plate, the Caulfield Guineas, the Royal Ascot Golden Jubilee S. and the July Cup.

“He was born at the farm and Tony kept a share in him when he won the Guineas. The farm sold out when Coolmore bought into him,” Murray said.

Joe Murray | Photo courtesy of Makybe Farm

His dam Gold Anthem (Made Of Gold {USA}) has had 12 foals to race and 11 have been successful and includes the mother of the G1 Thousand Guineas winner Amicus (Fastnet Rock).

“Gold Anthem has left a legacy for the farm but is not in foal at the moment, it’s the first time she’s missed in 16 years. She is a phenomenal mare and she still looks amazing,” Murray said. “We’re going to give her one go with Frosted, what he’s doing down her and in America is very exciting.

“Gold Anthem has left a legacy for the farm but is not in foal at the moment, it’s the first time she’s missed in 16 years.” – Joe Murray

“I went to see him at Darley before the lockdown and he looks like he will put in the size and scope, so we will give her every chance.”

Away from Makybe-developed families is Summer Surf (Big Brown {USA}), a $250,000 Inglis Chairman’s Sale purchase last year for Santic. She is a half-sister to the G1 Golden Slipper S. winner and sire Farnan.

“She was in foal to Brave Smash and we got a beautiful filly out of her. Farnan looks like he will get well looked after with broodmares this year so we are going to try and develop the family more ourselves,” Murray said.

“She’s in foal to The Autumn Sun and is going back to him. We would all have liked to see The Autumn Sun race on, but he didn’t have to prove anything else.

“It’s a beautiful mating on pedigree with Redoute’s Choice coming in and the Not A Single Doubt cross, so hopefully it works for us.”

Regal union planned

Star Of Sydney (Starcraft {NZ}) is an unraced half-sister to the G1 AJC Sires’ Produce S. winner and sire Invader, and to the G2 HKJC Jockey Club Sprint winner Not Listenin’tome (Dylan Thomas {Ire}). She will visit newcomer King’s Legacy.

“We haven’t been able to get up to see him due to the lockdown, but the reports we’ve heard on the first-season sires, that as a type, he was the pick for most people,” Murray said.

“Star Of Sydney has a fantastic pedigree, and her Fastnet Rock we sold at Magic Millions this year (for $650,000) to Aquis was an absolute belter. We have an American Pharoah this year and we had one throw at him last year, but it was a late cover and she missed.”

Lot 828 – Fastnet Rock x Star Of Sydney (colt) sold for $650,000 to Tony Fung Investments and Phoenix Thoroughbreds

Two other notable matings locked in are Cailin Miss (Domesday), who is in foal to Headwater, and Faith In Hand (Fastnet Rock), who will both visit I Am Invincible.

A previous visit to the Yarraman Park Stud stallion for Cailin Miss produced the G3 Kevin Hayes S. winner La Mexicana while Faith In Hand is a sister to Amicus and from Starspangledbanner’s family.

“If La Mexicana can win a Group 1, we’re laughing, so it was a no-brainer that Cailin Miss went back to Vinnie,” Murray said.

La Mexicana with Jamie Kah aboard

“Faith In Hand has a Vinnie filly that we will be sending to the sales and one of the nicest fillies we’ve had on the farm, so we had to go back.

“We sold her Sebring filly for $280,000 at Magic Millions, and I would have to have kept her. The mare does everything right and she’s currently in foal to American Pharoah.”

Makybe Diva’s matings are a joint effort between Santic, Murray and the Belmont Bloodstock Agency’s Damon Gabbedy.

“My input is with regards to the physical and if I can, I will view the stallions, Damon has an extensive knowledge of the bloodlines and Tony does a bit of everything,” Murray said.

Belmont Bloodstock Agency’s Damon Gabbedy (right) at yearling inspections

Article Courtesy of TDN Australia

Spendthrift Australia recently welcomed back a pair of their Kentucky-based team -G1 Breeders’ Cup Classic hero Vino Rosso (USA) and multiple Grade 1 winner and G1 Breeders’ Cup Dirt Mile runner-up Omaha Beach (USA)- to its Victoria nursery, about 60 kilometres from Central Melbourne.

 

They retired as two of the hottest stud prospects in North America in 2020 and were supported with according quality. Each is to be represented by their first young produce to go under the hammer during breeding stock sales in the upcoming American autumn.

Vino Rosso the talk of the town

By the influential Curlin (USA) and out of a mare by the late Street Cry (Ire), Vino Rosso was bred at Kentucky’s Glennwood Farm by John D. Gunther and cost owner Mike Repole’s Repole Stable and Vinnie Viola’s St. Elias Stable US$410,000 (AU$564,688) as a yearling at the 2016 Keeneland September Sale.

Though bred to excel over a route of ground, the Todd Pletcher-trained chestnut was a debut winner over seven furlongs (1400 metres) and stamped his ticket to the US Classics with a victory in the G2 Wood Memorial S. in April of his 3-year-old season.

He showed further improvement as an older horse, winning the G1 Gold Cup at Santa Anita and the Breeders’ Cup.

Though he was a later-maturing sort, breeders are reporting that his first-crop foals are shaping as anything but that.

“I have a really nice mare that I bred back to Vino Rosso in May, because every single Vino Rosso we have is stunning,” said Carrie Brogden, who breeds under the banner of Machmer Hall with her Australian-born husband Craig.

“Vino himself was a lovely horse, but I have been stunned with what I’ve seen and I think a lot of people feel the same way.”

“Vino (Rosso) himself was a lovely horse, but I have been stunned with what I’ve seen and I think a lot of people feel the same way.” – Carrie Brogden

She added: “They have bone, they have size, they have substance and they have a big, old kachunga–a big old butt. They look a lot faster than I would have expected for a horse that was a Classic-type distance horse. They look very correct and he’s really stamping them.

“I can’t think of any of them that we have that aren’t chestnut and really good-looking. Every single foal we have by him is a better physical than the mare they’re out of. He’s throwing sprinter-type bodies with stretch, and a lot of times, that gets you the miler-type that can get a distance as well.”

Carrie Brogden | Image courtesy of Fasig-Tipton Photo

Martha Jane Mulholland breeds out of Mulholland Springs in Kentucky and has also been taken by Vino Rosso’s first batch of horses.

“These foals look very early and I think you have to look individually at a horse,” she said. “They look quick and they look early. (Vino Rosso) ran a Classic distance, but it looks to me like he’s getting foals that will be able to sprint and go a distance when they get older.

“I am seeing a lot of size and scope and body and in a weanling, those are important,” Mulholland commented.

Vino Rosso (USA) | Standing at Spendthrift Australia

“They’ve got a lot of leg, a lot of air under them and they’re good-sized. They have the appropriate amount of length – they’re not too short-coupled and they’re not too long. Significant muscling, particularly in the hind quarters, which should make them quick and I like the way the neck sets into the shoulder and they’re very correct, solid horses.

“I also think they are very attractive-headed, which, commercially, a pretty foal always sells well. They are very nice foals, nice big eyes, good shoulder, good, scopey horses and very well-balanced.

“In a baby, if they’re correct and have good size and scope and a nice head, that bodes very well for a successful sales year. And the balance and muscling bodes well for success on the racetrack.”

Vino Rosso is one of 14 top-level winners for Hill ‘N’ Dale’s Curlin (USA), a number that also includes this Shadwell Stables’ G1 Kentucky Oaks winner Malathaat (USA), who recently added the prestigious G1 Alabama S. to her growing resume. According to Jody Huckabay, who operates Elm Tree Farm alongside his wife Michelle, Vino Rosso has every opportunity to follow in his sire’s considerable hoofprints.

“To me, he is throwing a lot of Curlin into them,” Huckabay said. “They’re very correct and very good movers and I’ve just been probably as impressed with him as any freshman sire that I’ve seen here this year, at our farm in particular. I am very high on them. We are putting two in the November sale, a colt and filly.

“They’re (Vino Rosso) very correct and very good movers and I’ve just been probably as impressed with him as any freshman sire that I’ve seen here this year.” – Jody Huckabay

“In my opinion, they look like they could be early. Short backs, good hips on them. I think the commercial people are going to snap them up. I think the 2-year-old (resellers) that fuel our market here are really going to like him.

“I’m just very keen on him, at least based upon the ones we have. They look like they’re going to be early enough, but that’s not all they’re going to be. I think they are also going to get better with time. But he’s going to have some early runners, if they look anything like ours.”

Brogden believes Vino Rosso will be a ‘buzz’ horse once mixed sales season kicks off in a few months’ time.

“You have this chatter across the farms in Kentucky -‘who do you like? who do you like?’ and invariably, I keep hearing that ‘I love my Vino.’ Obviously, Curlin is becoming such an influential stallion in the United States and I think (Vino Rosso) would do so well with the speedier, shorter-coupled mares in Australia.

“Curlin’s reputation continues to move forward, his flag is flying higher. He’s doing things he really shouldn’t be doing, and from what I see with the Vinos, it won’t shock me if that’s what you see there, too. And he has a beautiful female family. I am very excited for his foals.”

Omaha Beach, the Danzig connection

Danzig-line stallions need little introduction to the Australian market, but in the form of Omaha Beach, breeders also have access to a female family with abundant class and racetrack success.

A son of US$3.2 million (AU$4.4 million) Keeneland September yearling Charming (USA) (Seeking The Gold {USA}), Omaha Beach is a half-brother to Champion US 2-Year-Old filly Take Charge Brandi (USA) (Giant’s Causeway {USA}) and was himself bought in for US$625,000 (AU$860,804) at Keeneland in 2017. Treble Grade 1-winning second dam Take Charge Lady (USA), a daughter of successful dual-hemisphere stallion Dehere (USA), produced Champion 3-Year-Old colt Will Take Charge (USA) (Unbridled’s Song {USA}), Grade 1-winning sire Take Charge Indy (USA) (A.P. Indy {USA}) and multiple stakes winner As Time Goes By (USA) (American Pharoah {USA}).

Trained by Richard Mandella for the late Rick Porter’s Fox Hill Farms, Omaha Beach placed in three tries on the turf, but became a different animal once switched to the dirt, with victories in the G2 Rebel S. and G1 Arkansas Derby establishing him as the Kentucky Derby favourite. Forced to miss that engagement, he later returned to win a pair of Grade 1s over sprint trips either side of his runner-up effort in the Dirt Mile.

Omaha Beach’s first foals have impressed this group of breeders.

“I feel certain he will pass on his ability to his progeny,” said Mulholland. “This horse is producing the best foals that these good mares have ever had.

“With the size of his fee, he was sent some very nice mares, but these are nonetheless the nicest foals that these mares have ever had. Lots of quality, lots of class, good balance and size.

“The only other horse I felt this way about is (US Horse of the Year and Breeders’ Cup Classic winner) Gun Runner. I just don’t say that about a lot of stallions and I am going to go to (Omaha Beach) in his third year. I feel very strongly about that horse.”

“I feel certain he (Omaha Beach) will pass on his ability to his progeny. This horse is producing the best foals that these good mares have ever had.” – Martha Jane Mulholland

Added Huckabay: “I only have one Omaha Beach-unfortunately. I did breed a couple more mares to him, but they didn’t get pregnant. The one we have belongs to my son, very nice filly. She’s also going in November. (Spendthrift’s) Mark Toothaker came out and he thought she was a very good representation of what the sire can throw.”

Omaha Beach (USA) | Standing at Spendthrift

Huckabay reports that the filly, produced by the stakes-winning Star Super (USA) (Super Saver {USA}), has a date in the Keeneland November Breeding Stock Sale.

“We were original shareholders in War Front as well, and this filly to me looks like a lot of the good War Fronts,” he commented. “She’s got good leg, plenty of muscle. She’s a good mover and she ties together extremely well. She’s out of a pretty nice mare, we’re really pleased with her.

“She looks like a rocketship, no joke. She looks like just pure speed. Mark really thought she was one of the better ones he’d seen.”

The highly positive feedback from a handful of prominent breeders suggest that not only do prospective buyers on this side of the world have something very much to look forward to, but so, too, does the Australian industry when the first foals are offered to the market.

Article Courtesy of TDN Australia