Above: Ole Kirk winner of the G1 Caulfield Guineas
While Not A Single Doubt sits atop of the Australian Sires’ table, it is the improved performance set by newest stallion on the Arrowfield Stud roster, Written Tycoon, which stands out when looking at the results nearly four months into the 2020/21 racing season.

With the feature spring racing in Melbourne and Sydney now complete, it seems a good time to look at how the Sires’ Table has evolved and identify those stallions whose progeny have made the most impact since the start of the new season.

A huge boost courtesy of Classique Legend‘s win in The Everest sees Not A Single Doubt well clear on top when it comes to prizemoney, some $3 million ahead of his nearest rival, with over $10.3 million. However, the now pensioned son of Redoute’s Choice has enjoyed plenty of success outside of his star sprinter, with his 45 winners to date, bettering his return to the same point of the past two seasons.

He has had Shout The Bar win the G1 Empire Rose S., plus stakes wins from 3-year-old trio AndersDoubtland and Instant Celebrity as well as Classique Legend.

Written Tycoon, fresh from his move from Woodside Park to Arrowfield, is currently second on the Sires’ Table with $7.3 million in prizemoney. He leads all stallions in Australia when it comes to producing stakes winners to date in 2020/21, with nine. His career continues to forge new heights with every year and this Spring he celebrated a rare milestone when he became the first stallion in 44 years to sire the winner of both the G1 Caulfield Guineas (Ole Kirk) and the G1 Thousand Guineas (Odeum).

Ole Kirk, also a winner of the G1 Golden Rose, became his first multiple Group 1-winning son and is now well-poised to continue his legacy as a stallion in his own right, with his breeding future secured by Vinery Stud. The flying mare Pippie added a second Group 1 win to her resume in the G1 Moir S., while Written Tycoon has also had two juvenile stakes winners already this season in dominant G3 Gimcrack S. winner Enthaar, and G3 Maribyrnong Plate winner Finance Tycoon.

Dirty Work, set for a stallion career of his own at Spendthrift, won the G2 Schillaci S. while Written Beauty announced herself as a filly of considerable promise with her Group 3 win through the Flemington carnival. Rich Hips and Stageman have been Written Tycoon’s other stakes winners in the season to date.

That tally of nine stakes winners is three times as many as he had at the same time of last season at which point he sat 18th on the Sires’ Table, while in 2018/19 he was 14th as of November 24 with two stakes winners.

The volume of overall winners which have flowed for Written Tycoon are the other notable aspect of 2020/21. As of November 24, he currently leads all Australian stallions on winners with 88 in total, which is 31 more than at the same time last year and 28 more than two years ago.

The fact he leads the prolific winner-getter I Am Invincible in that regard is a measure of the remarkable start to the campaign his progeny has made.

Vinnie setting typically strong pace

Yarraman Park’s I Am Invincible is not slowing down in that regard. His 87 winners to this point is 17 more than he had last season at the same time and only two fewer than his record-breaking 2018/19 season.

‘Vinnie’ has had seven stakes winners to date, the second most of the season, and two more than he did through the spring of 2019. Two seasons back, he had an incomparable 15 black-type winners by the start of December in a season where he would set a new mark for the most stakes winners in a season (28).

Triple Group 2-winning filly Dame Giselle highlights I Am Invincible’s progeny for this season, while Fiesta is his other multiple Group winner. LibertiniCalifornia ZimbolFake LoveHolyfield and La Mexicana are his other Australian stakes winners this season.

With $5.7 million in prizemoney earned by his progeny this season, Vinnie sits fourth on the Sires’ Table, behind Darley’s legendary Exceed And Excel, in third.

Headed by his star sprinter Bivouac, who was second in The Everest and won the G1 Darley Sprint Classic in effortless fashion, Exceed And Excel’s progeny have won $6.45 million through the spring. September Run has been his other Group 1 winner in the G1 Coolmore Stud S. with Coruscate the third of his black-type winners.

Rounding out the top five is another Darley stallion in the former shuttler Teofilo (Ire), whose lofty position in the Sires’ Table is owed largely to his G1 Melbourne Cup winning son Twilight Payment (Ire), although he also had Humidor (NZ) win the G2 Feehan S.

Camelot (GB), the sire of G1 Cox Plate winner Sir Dragonet (Ire), is sixth, a result also assisted by Russian Camelot (Ire), his G1 Underwood S. winning son.

Stallion
2020-21
2019-20
Not A Single Doubt $10,347,155 $4,335,505
Written Tycoon $7,324,860 $3,386,039
Exceed And Excel $6,466,885 $4,297,365
I Am Invincible $5,778,611 $6,237,125
So You Think $5,433,920 $3,552,855
Pierro $5,213,975 $7,429,813
Hallowed Crown $4,705,800 $354,745
Fastnet Rock $4,400,995 $4,288,405
All Too Hard $4,371,160 $3,281,875
Snitzel $4,358,445 $3,660,250

Table: Australian-based sires by earnings until November 25 – comparison

So You Think’s fast start

Coolmore pair So You Think (NZ) and Pierro are currently seventh and eighth on the Sires’ Table. So You Think’s tally of five stakes winners, highlighted by Group 2 winner Peltzer, is at the same level as last spring, but his volume of winners has increased from 45 to 56 with only a slight increase of numbers to the track.

Pierro’s spring hasn’t quite matched the amazing pace he set last year, but Arcadia Queen, a dual Group 1 winner through the spring, has kept him ticking over, one of his three stakes winners.

Twin Hills Stud’s Hallowed Crown is somewhat of a surprise in the Top 10, but the Golden Eagle victory of his flagbearer Colette provided a substantial boost. He has the fewest amount of runners of any Australian-based sire in the Top 10. Zed (NZ), whose daughter Verry Elleegant (NZ) continued on her Group 1 winning ways through the spring with three elite level victories is currently the highest-placed New Zealand-based sire in 10th.

Stallion
2020-21
2019-20
2018-19
Written Tycoon 9 3 2
I Am Invincible 7 5 15
Snitzel 6 4 6
Not A Single Doubt 5 3 6
Zoustar 5 6 4

Table: Australian-based sires by stakes winners until November 25 – comparison

Snitzel primed for sprint home

The obvious absentee from the Top 10 at this stage is the four-time defending Australian Champion Sire Snitzel, who currently occupies 13th, with his progeny having earned $4.34 million. Those doubting whether he can make up his gap on his rivals only need to look at this time 12 months’ ago when he was 15th on the sires’ rankings, yet was still able to finish comfortably on top at the end of the season, some $2 million clear of his rivals.

The Arrowfield champion’s progeny performance across this spring is superior to last year. He has had more winners, 63 to 52, and more stakes winners, six to four. He sits third on the Sires’ List for stakes winners, and fourth overall for winners.

Ahead of him in terms of winners are the aforementioned Written Tycoon and I Am Invincible as well as All Too Hard, who has 64 winners to this point, four at stakes level.

Off the back of a breakthrough season in terms of Group 1 success in 2019/20, All Too Hard’s season to date has been highlighted by Behemoth‘s Group 1 double plus stakes wins from All Too HuiyingAllibor and Forbidden Love.

Smart Missile’s progeny have made an improved start to the season and he sits fifth when it comes to total winners, with 62, eight more than through the spring last season.

Going back to stakes winners, and there are eight stallions in total with more than five stakes winners at this point of the season. As well as those mentioned above, there is also SavabeelZoustar and Redoute’s Choice, who all have five apiece.

Stallion
2020-21
2019-20
2018-19
Written Tycoon 88 57 60
I Am Invincible 87 70 90
All Too Hard 64 50 34
Snitzel 63 52 69
Smart Missile 62 54 58

Table: Australian-based sires by winners until November 25 – comparison

Article courtesy of TDN Bren O’Brien