Above: Winner, Liz Hoy on Where’s Cameron with Jen Hughes at the RV 2019 Australian OTT Jumping Championship at Boneo Park Equestrian Centre on November 10, 2019 in Boneo, Australia. (Natasha Morello/Racing Photos)

After a short hiatus due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Thoroughbred Breeders Victoria (TBV), Racing Victoria (RV) and the Victorian Agricultural Society (VAS) will continue their partnership of the Off The Track classes at regional shows across Victoria.

The program allows Victorian breeders to support local equestrian shows which will see thousands of extra dollars in prizemoney on offer for those competing on Off The Track thoroughbreds.

Under the partnership, winners of the OTT Thoroughbred class at shows which have been sponsored by a local breeder will now receive, in addition to the OTT prizes on offer, an extra $150 plus a fantastic, customised horse rug, courtesy of TBV members.

This joint initiative, which was the brain-child of TBV, reflects the commitment to the welfare of the thoroughbred held by Victorian breeders and the desire to promote greater take-up of horses that have retired from racing.

TBV President, James O’Brien, who was a driving force behind establishing the partnership commented, “It was fantastic to see the Victorian industry show their support for this program and the great Off The Track horses that have been involved.” O’Brien said.

“This once again presents a wonderful chance for TBV members to ensure the longevity and demand for their thoroughbreds,” O’Brien said.

As a breeder, it is immensely satisfying to see your thoroughbred engaged in other pursuits outside of racing. That is what this initiative sets out to reinforce and doing so allows the Victorian breeding community to pay homage to equine welfare.”

“The cooperation we have received from OTT and VAS of this partnership is incredibly heartening. They have embraced the Victorian breeding community and we are tremendously grateful.”

Racing Victoria’s Manager – Equine Welfare, Jennifer Hughes, reinforced RV’s commitment to equine welfare.

“Thoroughbreds are the centrepieces of our industry, and Racing Victoria is committed to ensuring that they’re afforded appropriate care and attention before, during and after their careers on the racetrack,” Hughes said.

“As such, we are thrilled to have TBV and, more widely, Victorian breeders on board to enhance the OTT Thoroughbred classes and the VAS Show Series as a whole.”

VAS Ltd Chairperson, Jenny Daffy, is delighted with the newly formed partnership with the thoroughbred breeders, which will further enhance the already successful Off The Track series that is held at the Victorian Agricultural Shows.

“The support is wonderful and the additional prize money and rug at Show level I am sure will be well sought after by the competitors,” Daffy said.

The shows which are available this season for breeders to sponsor are:

  • Lang Lang – 16th January 2021
  • Yarra Glen – 6th February 2021
  • Foster – 27th February 2021
  • Tallangatta – 6th March 2021
  • Warrgul – 6th March 2021
  • Orbost – 8th March 2021
  • Berwick – 8th March 2021
  • Wodonga – 13th March 2021
  • Cohuna – 20th March 2021
  • Natimuk – 27th March 2021
  • Bunyip – 28th March 2021

Victorian breeders who would like to sponsor a local show should contact TBV on tbvmedia@racingvictoria.net.au.

The above shows listed are only the autumn shows and as the Spring shows become available to sponsor, TBV will update breeders.

Alternatively, if you already have a show in mind not listed, please drop us a note and we will confirm details.

Above: Small Minds

Small Minds (Canny Lad), the dam of talented juvenile Sneaky Five (Fastnet Rock), became the highest-priced horse sold on Inglis Digital after being purchased by Sandhurst Bloodstock on behalf of Rosemont Stud for $410,000 at the November (Late) Online Auction, surpassing the previous record of $400,000 for Manaya (Hinchinbrook).

The mare – a Group 1 winner herself – was offered by South Australia-based Goldin Farms in foal to Yulong sire Grunt (NZ) and will join the broodmare band of Rosemont who purchased and race Sneaky Five.

“It’s very hard to find a mare that has thrown two stakes winners – Sneaky Five and Beautiful Mind – from only four foals, three of which have raced, that’s a unique achievement for any broodmare,” Ryan McEvoy said.

“We were over the moon with purchasing Sneaky Five and to see what she has done in a short time, being undefeated in an Inglis Banner and $1 million Golden Gift to now be among the favourites for the Inglis Millennium and Golden Slipper.

“Small Minds is obviously a daughter of Canny Lad, so an easy mare to mate and we think there will be some great opportunities with her in the next five to six years.

“Small Minds is obviously a daughter of Canny Lad, so an easy mare to mate and we think there will be some great opportunities with her in the next five to six years.” – Ryan McEvoy

“Rosemont Stud has a lot of young stakes-performing mares on the farm so it’s great to secure a more proven style of mare, plus we’re hoping for a few fillies out of Small Minds to join the Rosemont broodmare band and that’s the reason why we were happy to be a little stronger on her.

“There was no shortage of seeing her marketed, it gave us plenty of time to do our due diligence and we’ve really enjoyed using the Inglis Digital platform.”

The decision for Goldin Farms to sell the mare straight off the back of the feats of Sneaky Five has paid dividends and Jeff Gordon said they were thrilled with the result.

“It’s unbelievable, an amazing price, amazing, Goldin Farms management couldn’t be happier,” Gordon said.

“I thought she would bring between $250,000 and $350,000 and even that was probably hopeful towards the top end, so to get the $410,000, wow, what a result for everybody.

“This mare is hot property at the moment considering what Sneaky Five has done already and the potential for further glory in 2021, so we put her in foal to Grunt and it’s just thrilling to see her realise such an amount.”

Earlier in the Sale, 3-year-old gelding Evolutionary (Snitzel) became the third-highest Inglis Digital sale, when purchased by Pacific Point Bloodstock HK for $330,000.

Evolutionary, who won a Randwick trial on Tuesday, was offered by Aquis Farm.

“This is a great result,” Aquis’ Managing Director, Shane McGrath, said. “The great thing about these Inglis Online sales is the transparency and that people can bid with confidence and that was certainly the case with Evolutionary and we couldn’t be happier.

“His two recent trial wins showed he would make a lovely horse for Hong Kong and this result shows the demand for the high-level Hong Kong horses is tremendous.

“He’s got a fantastic temperament this horse, he’s shown his tremendous ability as recently as Tuesday at the trials and he’s a very nice pick up for his new owners.’’

Great satisfaction

The November (Late) catalogue concluded with a gross of $2.25 million, ensuring the overall 2020 tally is now just $700,000 shy of cracking $50 million.

“I clearly remember our first sale (May 2017) and the delight with which we greeted a sale topper of $42,500, so to get to where we are today, knowing the full amount of effort that so many people have put in, is very fulfilling,” Inglis Digital Business Manager, Nick Melmeth, said.

“I take great satisfaction in hearing people refer to the platform as an ‘easy’ way to sell or buy, because a huge amount of work is done by a whole range of people behind the scenes – admin, accounts, marketing, research etc. – to achieve a high level of service.

“What is particularly exciting is that there is so much scope for the platform to progress further, already we have more than doubled the entire 2019 gross for the platform and all of the team is so stimulated by what can be achieved and we are just going to keep making it better and better.

“We are grateful for the opportunity and support from the market that we get for each and every Sale, but obviously we are especially thankful to Goldin Farms for the chance to sell a mare of the quality of Small Minds and relieved to achieve a result that I understand they are very pleased with.

“Similarly, I’m delighted for the Rosemont team to get her. Sneaky Five looks a star and given how much they put into the sport, they deserve all the success that comes their way.”

Article courtesy of TDN

Above: Ole Kirk winner of the G1 Caulfield Guineas
While Not A Single Doubt sits atop of the Australian Sires’ table, it is the improved performance set by newest stallion on the Arrowfield Stud roster, Written Tycoon, which stands out when looking at the results nearly four months into the 2020/21 racing season.

With the feature spring racing in Melbourne and Sydney now complete, it seems a good time to look at how the Sires’ Table has evolved and identify those stallions whose progeny have made the most impact since the start of the new season.

A huge boost courtesy of Classique Legend‘s win in The Everest sees Not A Single Doubt well clear on top when it comes to prizemoney, some $3 million ahead of his nearest rival, with over $10.3 million. However, the now pensioned son of Redoute’s Choice has enjoyed plenty of success outside of his star sprinter, with his 45 winners to date, bettering his return to the same point of the past two seasons.

He has had Shout The Bar win the G1 Empire Rose S., plus stakes wins from 3-year-old trio AndersDoubtland and Instant Celebrity as well as Classique Legend.

Written Tycoon, fresh from his move from Woodside Park to Arrowfield, is currently second on the Sires’ Table with $7.3 million in prizemoney. He leads all stallions in Australia when it comes to producing stakes winners to date in 2020/21, with nine. His career continues to forge new heights with every year and this Spring he celebrated a rare milestone when he became the first stallion in 44 years to sire the winner of both the G1 Caulfield Guineas (Ole Kirk) and the G1 Thousand Guineas (Odeum).

Ole Kirk, also a winner of the G1 Golden Rose, became his first multiple Group 1-winning son and is now well-poised to continue his legacy as a stallion in his own right, with his breeding future secured by Vinery Stud. The flying mare Pippie added a second Group 1 win to her resume in the G1 Moir S., while Written Tycoon has also had two juvenile stakes winners already this season in dominant G3 Gimcrack S. winner Enthaar, and G3 Maribyrnong Plate winner Finance Tycoon.

Dirty Work, set for a stallion career of his own at Spendthrift, won the G2 Schillaci S. while Written Beauty announced herself as a filly of considerable promise with her Group 3 win through the Flemington carnival. Rich Hips and Stageman have been Written Tycoon’s other stakes winners in the season to date.

That tally of nine stakes winners is three times as many as he had at the same time of last season at which point he sat 18th on the Sires’ Table, while in 2018/19 he was 14th as of November 24 with two stakes winners.

The volume of overall winners which have flowed for Written Tycoon are the other notable aspect of 2020/21. As of November 24, he currently leads all Australian stallions on winners with 88 in total, which is 31 more than at the same time last year and 28 more than two years ago.

The fact he leads the prolific winner-getter I Am Invincible in that regard is a measure of the remarkable start to the campaign his progeny has made.

Vinnie setting typically strong pace

Yarraman Park’s I Am Invincible is not slowing down in that regard. His 87 winners to this point is 17 more than he had last season at the same time and only two fewer than his record-breaking 2018/19 season.

‘Vinnie’ has had seven stakes winners to date, the second most of the season, and two more than he did through the spring of 2019. Two seasons back, he had an incomparable 15 black-type winners by the start of December in a season where he would set a new mark for the most stakes winners in a season (28).

Triple Group 2-winning filly Dame Giselle highlights I Am Invincible’s progeny for this season, while Fiesta is his other multiple Group winner. LibertiniCalifornia ZimbolFake LoveHolyfield and La Mexicana are his other Australian stakes winners this season.

With $5.7 million in prizemoney earned by his progeny this season, Vinnie sits fourth on the Sires’ Table, behind Darley’s legendary Exceed And Excel, in third.

Headed by his star sprinter Bivouac, who was second in The Everest and won the G1 Darley Sprint Classic in effortless fashion, Exceed And Excel’s progeny have won $6.45 million through the spring. September Run has been his other Group 1 winner in the G1 Coolmore Stud S. with Coruscate the third of his black-type winners.

Rounding out the top five is another Darley stallion in the former shuttler Teofilo (Ire), whose lofty position in the Sires’ Table is owed largely to his G1 Melbourne Cup winning son Twilight Payment (Ire), although he also had Humidor (NZ) win the G2 Feehan S.

Camelot (GB), the sire of G1 Cox Plate winner Sir Dragonet (Ire), is sixth, a result also assisted by Russian Camelot (Ire), his G1 Underwood S. winning son.

Stallion
2020-21
2019-20
Not A Single Doubt $10,347,155 $4,335,505
Written Tycoon $7,324,860 $3,386,039
Exceed And Excel $6,466,885 $4,297,365
I Am Invincible $5,778,611 $6,237,125
So You Think $5,433,920 $3,552,855
Pierro $5,213,975 $7,429,813
Hallowed Crown $4,705,800 $354,745
Fastnet Rock $4,400,995 $4,288,405
All Too Hard $4,371,160 $3,281,875
Snitzel $4,358,445 $3,660,250

Table: Australian-based sires by earnings until November 25 – comparison

So You Think’s fast start

Coolmore pair So You Think (NZ) and Pierro are currently seventh and eighth on the Sires’ Table. So You Think’s tally of five stakes winners, highlighted by Group 2 winner Peltzer, is at the same level as last spring, but his volume of winners has increased from 45 to 56 with only a slight increase of numbers to the track.

Pierro’s spring hasn’t quite matched the amazing pace he set last year, but Arcadia Queen, a dual Group 1 winner through the spring, has kept him ticking over, one of his three stakes winners.

Twin Hills Stud’s Hallowed Crown is somewhat of a surprise in the Top 10, but the Golden Eagle victory of his flagbearer Colette provided a substantial boost. He has the fewest amount of runners of any Australian-based sire in the Top 10. Zed (NZ), whose daughter Verry Elleegant (NZ) continued on her Group 1 winning ways through the spring with three elite level victories is currently the highest-placed New Zealand-based sire in 10th.

Stallion
2020-21
2019-20
2018-19
Written Tycoon 9 3 2
I Am Invincible 7 5 15
Snitzel 6 4 6
Not A Single Doubt 5 3 6
Zoustar 5 6 4

Table: Australian-based sires by stakes winners until November 25 – comparison

Snitzel primed for sprint home

The obvious absentee from the Top 10 at this stage is the four-time defending Australian Champion Sire Snitzel, who currently occupies 13th, with his progeny having earned $4.34 million. Those doubting whether he can make up his gap on his rivals only need to look at this time 12 months’ ago when he was 15th on the sires’ rankings, yet was still able to finish comfortably on top at the end of the season, some $2 million clear of his rivals.

The Arrowfield champion’s progeny performance across this spring is superior to last year. He has had more winners, 63 to 52, and more stakes winners, six to four. He sits third on the Sires’ List for stakes winners, and fourth overall for winners.

Ahead of him in terms of winners are the aforementioned Written Tycoon and I Am Invincible as well as All Too Hard, who has 64 winners to this point, four at stakes level.

Off the back of a breakthrough season in terms of Group 1 success in 2019/20, All Too Hard’s season to date has been highlighted by Behemoth‘s Group 1 double plus stakes wins from All Too HuiyingAllibor and Forbidden Love.

Smart Missile’s progeny have made an improved start to the season and he sits fifth when it comes to total winners, with 62, eight more than through the spring last season.

Going back to stakes winners, and there are eight stallions in total with more than five stakes winners at this point of the season. As well as those mentioned above, there is also SavabeelZoustar and Redoute’s Choice, who all have five apiece.

Stallion
2020-21
2019-20
2018-19
Written Tycoon 88 57 60
I Am Invincible 87 70 90
All Too Hard 64 50 34
Snitzel 63 52 69
Smart Missile 62 54 58

Table: Australian-based sires by winners until November 25 – comparison

Article courtesy of TDN Bren O’Brien

Above: Night Of Thunder (Ire) | Standing at Darley Europe

A rare opportunity for Southern Hemisphere breeders will be on offer at next week’s Tattersalls December Mares Sale, with a mare in foal to former shuttler Night Of Thunder (Ire), who was covered on Southern Hemisphere time, set to go through the ring.

The Tattersalls December Mares Sale in Newmarket has long been a happy hunting ground for Southern Hemisphere breeders and next week’s Sale will see a mare go through the ring that has been specifically entered to target the Australian market.

Lot 1747 – a 5-year-old daughter of Invincible Spirit (Ire) named Tashaarok (Ire) – will be offered by Ireland-based Tinnakill House and has been covered by former Darley shuttler Night Of Thunder on Southern Hemisphere time.

Having observed the success Night Of Thunder was having Down Under at the beginning of the year, Jack Cantillon went out and sourced a mare specifically to have covered by the stallion with the intention of selling her to Australia.

With the son of Dubawi (Ire) only shuttling to Australia for one season and covering a small book of just 96 mares, Cantillon believes his mare presents a rare opportunity for the Australian breeding industry.

“We had lockdown here in Ireland and lockdown prompted a bit more watching of Australian racing than we normally would, even though we’re big fans,” Cantillon told TDN AusNZ. “And one of the things we noticed was how well Night Of Thunder had done with 13 per cent stakes winners to runners with his first crop and he’d done something similar in Europe.

“We had lockdown here in Ireland and lockdown prompted a bit more watching of Australian racing than we normally would, even though we’re big fans.” – Jack Cantillon

“We were very keen to find a mare for him to cover on Southern Hemisphere time. We’ve done it before, we sold a mare in foal to Invincible Spirit on Southern Hemisphere time and we were keen to do it again.”

Selected from Cyprus

Purchased as a yearling by Shadwell Stud for 135,000 gns (AU$257,985), Tashaarok then went to the 2018 December Mares Sale where she was purchased by Elias Kritikos to continue her career in the Middle East before being sourced by Cantillon.

“A good friend of mine Mike Kelly is a great man to find a mare in an unusual place and working together we bought Tashaarok in Cyprus.

“It wouldn’t be a conventional place to buy a mare but she was an expensive yearling who was bought by very smart people in Shadwell so that gave me confidence that she was good looking and the videos backed that up,” Cantillon said.

“In the intervening period, her half-sister Lady Penelope, who is also by Night Of Thunder, was a very talented Listed-winning sprinter for Joseph O’Brien.

“After that, she ticked all the boxes for me as the perfect mare for Night Of Thunder.

“She’s by Invincible Spirit and that’s already a proven cross with Under The Stars who is one of the best 2-year-olds for Night Of Thunder, she is also out of an Invincible Spirit mare.”

Under The Stars (Ire) became the first stakes winner for her sire when taking out the G3 Princess Margaret S. at Ascot, then followed it up with a Listed win at Haydock as a 3-year-old after finishing sixth in the G1 1000 Guineas.

But it was Night Of Thunder’s Australian success that appealed to Cantillon.

“I had John Burke from the Godolphin Flying Start join me and he had actually done his project at the end of the Flying Start on how well Night Of Thunder was doing in Australia and he wanted to do the exact same thing, so he ended up taking a leg of the mare. Then I have the rest of her with my father Dermot so we’re very excited to sell her.

“It’s something a bit different and it’s a bit of a challenge but we’re looking forward to it next week.”

A rare gem

Night Of Thunder has sired 16 winners with his three stakes winners headed by Group 2 winner Cherry Tortoni, from 24 runners out of 53 foals, in his one and only crop in Australia. Cantillon believes it’s a great chance to offer something to Australia that is out of the ordinary.

“What drives price more than anything is value and there are only 30 mares covered to him on Southern Hemisphere time, of which this is the only one at public auction in Europe in 2020. I think that is compelling and something exciting for people to get involved with,” he said.

“What drives price more than anything is value and there are only 30 mares covered to him on Southern Hemisphere time, of which this is the only one at public auction in Europe in 2020.” – Jack Cantillon

Despite no Australian or New Zealand buyers being able to make their way to the European sales this year, we have still seen plenty of Southern Hemisphere action through the use of online platforms and agents on the ground.

However, Cantillon had his mare covered in September, before any of the major sales took place, making it a risky move but he said it was a risk he was willing to take.

“The internet is an amazing thing and I think if you get the word out there, people understand value and nowadays you look at a mare online and you buy it,” he said. “I’ve done it myself and I’m sure there will be Australian buyers doing it there this week.

“We’ve had lots of interest already. Lots of people have been very curious and have asked lots of questions and asked for photos so we are happily obliging and doing that. It’s been very positive so far.”

Article courtesy of Georgie Dennis TDN

Above: Hawkshot ridden by Mark Zahra wins the Magnum Equine 2YO Maiden Plate at Sportsbet-Ballarat Racecourse . (Pat Scala/Racing Photos)

Every horse-person has seen and felt the white grit that remains on a horse’s coat long after he’s dried from sweating. But do you know what that is?

The grit is residual electrolytes that have left the body with the sweat and dried on the coat. It’s easy to see that the more the horse sweats, the greater the lost electrolytes. In fact, horse sweat is more concentrated in electrolytes than blood, which is the opposite of humans, so there is potential for extreme losses of electrolytes in exercising horses.

The major electrolytes in sweat are sodium, chloride, and potassium. Minor amounts of calcium and magnesium are also present, as are miniscule quantities of other trace minerals. Electrolytes are responsible for maintenance of acid-base balance and osmotic regulation of body fluids. Without electrolytes, the body is not capable of maintaining the right amount of fluid in and around cells. Although body fluid regulation is complex and involves enzymes, hormones, and proteins as well as electrolytes, the basic concept revolves around cell hydration. If cells lose too much water, they die. It is therefore important for the body to have an adequate supply of electrolytes, which means there could be times when supplemental electrolytes should be added to the diet of the horse.

A normal diet of forage will provide some electrolytes to the horse. By feeding a commercial feed (usually containing salt) and giving access to a salt block (or loose salt), all of a horse’s electrolyte requirements will be met under normal circumstances. In fact, the ingesta found in the large intestine acts as a reservoir of electrolytes for the horse to draw upon when needed. However, once the horse starts sweating a lot, whether it is with exercise or exposure to high heat, the reservoir may not be adequate in supplying sufficient electrolytes and, in this case, the horse will benefit from supplemental electrolytes. The quantity of electrolyte needed depends on how much the horse is sweating and for how long. Horses undergoing prolonged exercise like endurance or event horses may particularly benefit from electrolyte supplementation.

Electrolyte loss can result in dehydration. Testing for dehydration is simple: pinch a fold of skin over the shoulder and observe how slowly it returns into place. If the skin does not snap back quickly, measures should be taken to rehydrate the horse. Signs of more severe dehydration are unsteady gait, uncoordinated muscle contractions, trembling, and muscle weakness. The horse may lose interest in drinking even when dehydrated, because when both water and electrolytes are lost, the thirst response (the physiological trigger that tells a horse when to drink) malfunctions. Electrolytes are only part of the picture of fluid balance. Water is necessary and should not be overlooked when offering salt or electrolyte supplements; ideally, water should be available free choice so that the horse can drink when thirst hits.

When the horse is losing significant amounts of sweat, supplemental electrolytes can be given. A well-formulated electrolyte supplement should be mostly sodium chloride (salt). Other ingredients will be potassium chloride, calcium, magnesium, and other trace minerals. Typically, a little sugar is added to improve the palatability and was previously believed to improve the absorption of sodium, but that has since been found to be not completely true in the horse. If there is added sugar, it should not constitute more than 10% of the mixture, so as not to take away from the amount of electrolyte in the product. Most electrolytes can be mixed into a horse’s feed, mixed as a concentrated solution in a syringe, or added to water. When giving electrolytes in the feed or concentrated electrolytes in a syringe, it is extremely important to have free-choice access to water available so that the horse has something to drink when the electrolytes make it thirsty. Caution should be taken if adding electrolytes to the horse’s water; it is important to provide an additional bucket of plain water in case the horse refuses the electrolyte-laden water but needs to drink.  Most horses have to learn to drink electrolytes in the water, and it is not usually something the horse will take to immediately.

Choose electrolyte supplements formulated by reputable companies. Kentucky Equine Research (KER) has developed several electrolyte supplements, including Restore SR and Restore Paste (Restore and Restore Paste in Australia), and Race Recovery (specifically for high-performance horses given furosemide; available in the U.S.). Other KER-formulated electrolytes designed for endurance horses are available in Australia.

Proper use of electrolyte supplementation can help maintain correct fluid balance in the horse when dietary electrolyte replenishment is too slow; so it is worth figuring out the best method of delivery of electrolytes for each horse before there is a critical moment of need.

Above: Grandview Avenue after winning the Fiorente @ Sun Stud Carlyon Stakes at Moonee Valley Racecourse. (Brett Holburt/Racing Photos)

All hobby breeders are entitled to at least one good horse and 75-year-old retired builder Peter McLaren reckons he has finally been rewarded.

McLaren bred Grandview Avenue, the winner of last Saturday’s Listed Norman Carlyon Stakes (1000m) at Moonee Valley.

It was the five-year-old gelding’s second win in eight days after also winning at The Valley over 955m.

The horse is trained at Warrnambool by McLaren’s son-in-law Simon Ryan whose wife Kate is on the Warrnambool Racing Club committee.

McLaren bred the horse, by the now retired Victorian stallion Statue of Liberty, out of his mare Magic By Gosh (Magic Albert x Kashcrop).

“I have been at it (breeding) for most of my life actually,” he said.

“I have never been able to get a winner in town, but the mare came along and I’d probably been going to Eliza Park for 25 years when the Flemings had it of course.

“And I went there repeatedly.”

He sent Magic By Gosh to Written Tycoon in the 2011 and 2012 seasons which produced Steve’s Choice and the unraced Tycoon Mia. He said he got each service fee for about $2200.

He sold the mare Steve’s Choice which won two races for Albury trainer Brian Cox and had another win for Craig Widdison.

Unfortunately Tycoon Mia was killed in a paddock accident.

McLaren, who has a property outside of Warrnambool, said the third foal out of Magic By Gosh was also by Statue Of Liberty and he was told by Eliza Park there was a lot of interest in the then weanling.

“I had never sold horses before and just raced them and I said I won’t be selling the little fellow under 50 grand and they rang me the next day and said the horse is sold if you’ll take 50.

“He went on and won the reverse way of going at Ballarat (two-year-old classic worth $120,000) for trainer Jason Petch.

“His clients bought the horse (Claro El Banco which was originally named Peace Get Joy) and but I think he finished in Macau.”

After the mare produced a colt by Bushranger, McLaren was in a hurry to get the mare back to Statue of Liberty after seeing what Peace Get Joy had done.

The mating produced Grandview Avenue, which was Magic By Gosh’s second last foal. She has Ashford Street by Moshe which has raced once. The mare, which was raced by McLaren’s son Dean and a group of his friends, died last year when in foal to Squamosa.

“I had to get back to Statue Of Liberty with the mare because I was going to it, no one else was going to get it this time and we got this colt, Grandview Avenue,” he said.

McLaren estimates he has been breeding horses since he got married in 1968.

And Simon Ryan believes there is a good sprint race in Grandview Avenue.

He believes Grandview Avenue deserves a crack at the Group 1 Black Caviar Stakes in the New Year. The Oakleigh Plate is also among the options.

Grandview Avenue’s half-brother, Ashwood Street, has had one unplaced run but shows some potential

“And the other half-brother Kednelly (Bushranger) ran on Sunday and has won a couple of races but is just about finished. He hasn’t done anything for a long time and will be retired shortly,” Ryan said.

Ryan said his father-in-law was very passionate about breeding and had a few good financial days with Grandview Avenue.

He said at his stage of life, if McLaren got another horse, he would probably buy one that is ready to race.

“Bu he is very passionate and has bred horses most of his life but this is the best one by far that he has bred” Ryan said.

The Warrnambool trainer says he doesn’t see him racing the gelding beyond 1000m anytime in the foreseeable future.

It was only back in October that Grandview Avenue won an 1100m benchmark 64 sprint at Murtoa – but he smashed his rivals by seven lengths.

Ryan said Grandview Avenue’s five wins at 1100m had been at country tracks and he was probably simply better than the opposition.

“The only thing that has really changed with him now is that you can ride him forward and if he got up on the pace as a three-year-old or early four-year-old, he would compound at bit,” Ryan said.

“He seems to be finishing his races off. Teo Nugent seems to think he can run that 10.5 seconds for five furlongs and said you’d be silly to hold him up when he can run that fast for the thousand metres.

“And he made the comment that we held him up a bit at Flemington because he had 61kg and Teo said if he knew then what he knows now, he would have let him go and he got beaten a length. He thinks he could have nearly got away with that one as well as holding him up is not a good idea.”

Ryan said opposition horses were finding it difficult to peg back Grandview Avenue once he got a three or four length break on them.

But he said with that style of racing, Moonee Valley might also suit the horse when he kicks off the bend and the opposition haven’t got a long straight to run him down.

Ryan said Grandview Avenue had good form on wet tracks and as a heavy horse, he just wonders whether The Valley surface has just got the sting out of it which might suit him.

“I have got quite a few jumpers and you see where wet trackers also run well at Moonee Valley in summer on good tracks and it might have something to do with a bit of the edge off it,” he said.

“When you walk around on the grass, it is a beautiful surface.

“I would be going to Flemington thinking he would run really well but in the middle of summer you’d expect to get really fast ground and it might not suit him.

“If there is a big race in him, it might be at Moonee Valley, but I’m sure one will pop up sooner or later.”

Starting at $7.50 at The Valley last week, Ryan said a lack of support for his horse from the tipsters kept him grounded a bit.

Ryan said the stop watch doesn’t lie and the gelding will be competitive in the good races while running those quick times where ever he goes over 1000m.

Above: Brad Rawiller launches into the air after winning the Winterbottom Stakes with Elite Street (picture: Western Racepix)

Prominent Western Australian breeders Robert and Ann Anderson breed to sell all the stock from their Anita Vale Stud.

But Robert admits that sometimes they are forced to retain a horse or two when they are deemed unfit for sale because of conformation or others issues.

He also admits that the retention of the horses, which they then race, sometimes works and obviously sometimes doesn’t.

Elite Street, by Darley’s Victorian stallion Street Boss, is one that has certainly worked after being withdrawn from the premier book of the 2018 Perth Yearling Sale because of “high risk x-rays.’’

The four-year-old gelding broke his maiden status in June and on Saturday took out Perth’s premier sprinting event, the Group 1 Winterbottom Stakes (1200m) at Ascot with relocated Victorian jockey Brad Rawiller in the saddle.

Robert and Ann race the gelding with trainer Dan Morton’s parents, Len and Annette Morton.

Starting at $31, Elite Street won $596,200 for the victory.

Anderson said he had always liked the Street Cry line and Street Boss was very attractive to them on the particular mating with Elite Street’s dam, Elite Ateates (Exceed and Excel x Ateates).

“I can’t remember the details now but I went into in quite some depth at the time,” he said.

“I recalled that Street Boss was a very fast horse and started his career very well over here.”

Elite Street is Elite Ateates’ first foal and her second, a filly named Sixtyfourth Street by Street Boss, was sold by Anita Vale Stud as a weanling for $60,000. She has a colt by Nicconi, a filly by Dundeel and has just had a colt by Written By. The Nicconi colt – Elite Icon – sold for $160,000 at last year’s Perth Yearling Sale.

The Andersons have retained the Dundeel filly which Robert says is immature but they’d be patient with her and give her the necessary time to develop.

Elite Ateates is back in Victoria, where Anderson originally purchased her from, where she has been mated with Spendthrift Farm’s Omaha Beach (War Front x Charming).

Anderson said at this stage Elite Street’s future races were still being planned.

“We are still thinking about it, turning it over and seeing how he pulls up and looking ahead to the programming,” he said.

“We are just assessing how much weight he’ll get in this sort of race or that sort of race, so Ann and I haven’t had a chance to talk to our racing partners Len and Annette Morton so I can’t say what lies ahead at this stage.”

And in an unusual twist, Elite Street was forced to change his name after originally being named Out In The Street. Another horse by Street Boss had the same name but it was all one word – Outinthestreet.

“It was most unfortunate as we liked the name Out In The Street which is a famous musical album,” Anderson said.

“We were given that name then it turned out there was a five-year-old Street Boss running around with the same name but it was one word.

“It wasn’t picked up at the time and we were informed we had to change the name so we did.”

Elite Street had surgery to remove a bone chip in the offside knee which was detected in the x-rays along with other problems. And then on debut at Ascot, Elite Street was forced to have more surgery after chipping both knees in November last year.

Anderson and his wife breed four or five horses each year and says with the way stallions fees are, they are small scale breeders in the West.

They have seven broodmares and on average send five of them to stud each year.

“Sometimes it’s all of them, but for one reason or another it’s usually five,” he said.

“Doing that you get about four foals to sell and we just tick along like that and have done for many years.

“We breed to sell and only keep and race the ones we get stuck with.

“It’s good to have this one but it doesn’t always work out that way.”

Anderson said the best horse they’ve bred and sold was Scenic Shot (17 wins) but says Ancient Song wouldn’t be too far behind him.

Scenic Shot (Scenic x Sweepshot) won three Group 1s – the Doomben Cup (twice) and Mackinnon Stakes. The gelding also won five Group 2 races and four Listed races to finish his career with just more than $3 million in prizemoney.

The mare Ancient Song (Canny Lad x Hello Lottie) won the Group 1 VRC Salinger Stakes, the Group 2 AJC Light Finger Stakes and the Listed June Stakes.

More recently they bred Portland Sky (Deep Field x Sky Rumba) which Mornington trainer Matt Laurie paid $85,000 for at last year’s Perth Yearling Sale. The colt has two wins from four starts, including victory in the Group 3 MRVC Red Anchor Stakes (1200m) in October.

Anderson said as well as sending Elite Street’s dam to Omaha Beach, he also sent a mare to Swettenham Stud’s Highland Reel this season.

“I just love Highland Reel,” he said.

“He is a great horse with beautiful bloodlines.”

Anderson said Elite Street was the first Group 1 winner they had bred and raced themselves.

The Andersons have been breeding for 40 years and Robert says the highs are very high.

Elite Street was Street Boss’ second Australian Group 1 winner and follows the victory of The Quarterback in the 2016 VRC Newmarket Handicap (1200m). Street Boss has now had 12 individual winners of 18 stakes races.

Darley Australia’s Victorian manager at Northwood Park, Andy Makiv, said Street Boss was a stallion he believed would continue to do a good job.

“He has done a good job with winners and stakes horses, particularly city winners,” Makiv said.

“I think the back end of his career will be a really good time for him. Godolphin has certainly sent a lot of good mares to him over the journey and it’s obviously good to pick up a horse like Hanseatic in that first crop of our usage and then Anamoe in the second crop.

“We anticipate that we are going to get some really nice horses.”

Makiv said they anticipate Street Boss, who had his first Australian season at stud in 2009, to being a similar stallion at the back end of his career as Commands.

“A good proven stallion who can get nice horses, nice sprinters, good city class horses and we think towards the back end of his stallion career he will get better and better horses, not unlike Commands,” Makiv said.

“And that’s how we sort of see him anyway and I think the market is starting to see it that sort of way as well. His yearlings are making more and more money and people want to buy them.”

Makiv said Street Boss produces a good, sound type which makes him a handy stallion.

Above: Lady Day ridden by Shirley Hunter wins the Bill McGrath Civil Engineering BM64 at bet365 Park Wodonga Racecourse. (David Thorpe/Racing Photos)

He might be a doctor, but Don Watson warns you wouldn’t want him performing any surgical procedures.

As he points out he is a Doctor of Philosophy who has raced horses for more than 40 years, but it’s only been in recent years he has dabbled in breeding them.

The 71-year-old Watson is an award winning author who has written several books and in the 1980s wrote political satire for comedian Max Giles and then became a speechwriter for Prime Minister Paul Keating.

Watson, in many ways, is just another example of the way racing attracts and so often mesmerises and claims people from all walks of life.

His first crack at breeding was more than six years ago when he did a bit of research and sent a mare named Domino Lady (Umatilla x Avietwo) to the Group winning stallion Stryker (Fastnet Rock x Laetitia).

Watson had raced Domino Lady with some success with Benalla trainer Peter Burgun and a small group of other friends. She won three races before falling victim to the mosquito carrying viral disease, Ross River fever.

“Domino Lady won three races for us but contracted Ross River fever and that buggered her up,” he said.

“Myself and my wife Shirley thought she could win a race in Melbourne over 2000m or so and we won first up with her every time.

“But after that it was the too hard basket and her body couldn’t cope with the Ross River fever after we found out what was going on. I think she is going to be a pretty handy broodmare.

“Her first foal was Miss Midian but she got a virus which buggered her. We tried everything with her.”

Quick to point out he is no Rick Jamieson of Black Caviar fame, Watson says he is an amateur but believes he has got better at the breeding game since sending Domino Lady to Stryker when the stallion was standing at Three Bridges Thoroughbreds at Eddington.

The mating produced Lady Day, a mare that notched up back-to-back victories with a win at Wodonga last Friday for Watson, Burgun and their co-owners and friends.

Lady Day has won five races, as well as a second and two thirds, from 23 starts.

Watson said Stryker’s often win early and then battle along but five-year-old Lady Day has bucked the trend and trained on.

And he explains part of the reason why he sent the mare to Stryker was because he’d met Three Bridge’s owner Peter Liston.

“I can remember that Stryker was a really well bred horse by Fastnet Rock and from Denise Joy’s family and I thought they match up really well,” Watson said.

“She was always a nice-looking foal and Peter (Burgun) liked her from the moment he saw her.”

While Watson said there was no science into his first breeding venture, he now does a lot more than just looking at nicks and always goes a bit further into his research and has selected all the stallions for Domino Lady.

The price of the service fee was always a factor with only a small ownership group.

Watson said Burgun was always confident Domino Lady would be a good broodmare.

“She is a beautiful animal, a lovely creature,” he said.

Domino Lady’s first foal was by Moshe, but the filly showed little in her six starts. Then Lady Day was produced, the broodmare then slipped to Moshe, missed to Unencumbered and then had a colt to Trust In A Gust before missing to Magnus.

Domino Lady now also has a yearling colt by Highland Reel and a colt by Puissance de Lune.

“Peter thinks the Trust In A Gust is a beauty and I thought the Storm Cat thing would work as I’d read a bit about that,” Watson said.

“To be honest, I like dealing with Swettenham (Stud) as they are nice folk. I loved Highland Reel as a racehorse and it makes my heart beat fast watching his tapes.

“I just love Galileo and the yearling we have looks like Highland Reel and Galileo and is an absolute knock out.”

Watson said the four-week-old colt by Puissance de Lune has the longest legs he’s even seen.

Domino Lady has gone to Rosemont Stud’s Shamus Award this season.

Watson described breeding Lady Day to win a race as the most “unqualified success” in his life.

“It’s only a pure hobby and I really haven’t got time to be doing it but I have loved racing since I was five-years-old,” he said.

“And here I am and she keeps popping them out and the owners keep thinking that’s another one I have to pay for.

“I write for a living and I’m 71-years-old and if I had my life again I might become a horse breeder and I said that to my wife the other day and she just snarled at me.

“My special skill is getting people into horses before they know it.”

Watson said his first share in a horse was in the late 1980s with an extremely slow gelding called Really Dry which was trained by Jim Conlan. He said he raced another three slow ones.

But he has been with Burgun for more than 30 years and has had plenty of winners.

Burgun said it was always good to win races for good clients and mates. And four of Lady Day’s wins have been ridden by Burgun’s wife, Shirley Hunter.

Burgun said that Watson looks after the breeding side of things.

“Don has been a client of mine and more a good mate and friend for probably 40 years,” Burgun said.

“We have trained a lot of winners for him. He is in most of our horses and we train them and they work out the rest of it.

“I don’t know anything about the breeding and pedigrees and they could tell me they’d put a donkey over her and I’d probably believe them.”

Burgun, who likes to buy tried horses, has 11 horses in work and trains at his 40 acre property which has all the facilities, including a 1000m sand track.

And Stryker is still serving mares, just across the border at Deniliquin in New South Wales where he stands at Basham Thoroughbreds.

Above: Hampton Court

Cornwall Park Stud yesterday announced the death of Hampton Court (Redoute’s Choice) on November 17 from natural causes, aged nine. The Victorian farm, purchased by Peter Boyle and Lisa Gordon in May, had stood Hampton Court this season, having previously shuttled for Spendthrift. Hampton Court, who won the Spring Champion Stakes (Gr 1, 2000m) in 2014, has American stakes placegetter Fast Verdict from his first northern hemisphere crop, while he has had winners in the US, Australia, Mexico, South Korea, Canada, Malaysia and Peru.

Article courtesy of ANZ

Above: Frosted standing at Darley Northwood Park, Victoria

Travel Column (USA) became Frosted‘s (USA) first American stakes winner overcoming a checkered passage in Saturday’s G2 Golden Rod S. at Churchill Downs.

A half-step slow out of the gates, Travel Column was last to make the clubhouse turn and was taken hold of by Florent Geroux as Farsighted (USA) (Bernardini {USA}) took them along at a sensible clip.

The US$850,000 (AU$1.15 million) Fasig-Tipton Saratoga acquisition was slipped a bit of rein at about midway and improved her position into midfield and within striking distance as they hit the turn. Going well as they neared the stretch, Travel Column had absolutely nowhere to go and was carefully maneuvered across three sets of heels to lay down a four-path challenge in the final furlong. Recent debut winner Clariere (USA) (Curlin {USA}) hit the front with time ticking away, but Travel Column had the answers and raced past that one en route to a determined success.

Travel Column ranks as the most expensive of her sire’s 67 first-crop yearlings reported as sold in 2019. The second black-type winner (Frosted’s Australian-bred son Ingratiating was a Listed winner at his first asking at Flemington Racecourse on October 3), Travel Column is a half-sister to an American Pharoah (USA) colt that fetched US$1.25 million (AU$1.67 million) from Speedway Stables to be the second most expensive horse at this year’s Fasig-Tipton Selected Yearlings Showcase in September.

Article courtesy of TDN

Above: Sioux Nation (USA) shuttled to Australia in 2019 standing at Swettenham Stud

Coolmore freshman Sioux Nation (USA) claimed the spotlight on the final day of the Tattersalls December Foal Sale at Newmarket which concluded with an impressive overall clearance rate of 79 per cent.

Resilience praised as Sioux shines

“Not for the first time this year we can reflect on a market which has displayed extraordinary and commendable resilience,” said Tattersalls Chairman Edmond Mahony in his closing address for the December Foal Sale. Those sentiments have been repeated often around Park Paddocks this week, just as they were back in October when the trade for yearlings was frankly remarkable given the events of 2020.

As the curtain fell on the fourth and final day of foals, again the most noteworthy figure was the clearance rate of 79 per cent, which rose from 72 per cent last year, though it must be remembered that this year’s catalogue was nearly 200 foals lighter.

During the final session, it was the Coolmore freshman Sioux Nation who claimed the spotlight from his stud-mate Saxon Warrior (Jpn), who had made quite a splash with members of his first crop earlier in the week. For the young son of Scat Daddy (USA) however, it was Lot 1075, a colt from Barton Stud, who was one of the early leaders at 88,000 gns (AU$166,320) and remained there throughout the shortened session.

Rebecca Matthews won’t be regretting her 1,500 gns (AU$2835) purchase of the colt’s dam, the once-raced Autumn Snow (GB) (Invincible Spirit {Ire}), from the Godolphin draft of the 2018 February Sale.

The sister to G2 July S. runner-up Figure Of Speech (Ire) has subsequently produced a filly by Highland Reel (Ire), followed by her son by Sioux Nation, who was bred by The Brigadier Partnership, led by Matthews.

Barton Stud manager Tom Blain said, “He was the stand-out foal today, we deliberately came today to sell on the Saturday to stand out and it is a fantastic result. This was an investment by the breeders to get a bloodstock business going so this is really a great start.”

Sioux Nation shuttled to Australia in 2019 to stand at Swettenham Stud with his first foals arriving this spring.

Australia colt with Melbourne Cup connection

One of Sioux Nation’s more established companions on the Coolmore roster, the dual Derby winner Australia (GB), has also enjoyed a good week, with 11 foals sold for an average just shy of 50,000 gns (AU$94,500), and his colt from the family of G1 Melbourne Cup winner Rekindling (GB) (High Chaparral {Ire}) was the pick for pinhookers Matthew Houldsworth and Aughamore Stud, who went to 62,000 gns (AU$117,180) for Lot 1097.

Offered by his breeder Stringston Farm, the colt is out of Bitooh (GB), a Diktat (GB) half-sister to Rekindling, both of whom were sold by the Pocock family as foals at Tattersalls. Having previously been owned by Godolphin, Bitooh was bought back by the Pococks after Rekindling’s Cup victory.

The family does very well with Australia and he is a lovely horse to deal with,” said Stringston’s Nick Pocock, who added that Bitooh is likely to return to the stallion next year.

The mare’s half-brother Sydney Opera House (GB) is, as his name implies, a son of Australia and was runner-up in the G1 Criterium de Saint-Cloud. Meanwhile, Rekindling, now six, returns to Tattersalls next week to be sold as a stallion prospect as Lot 1504.

Sea The Moon in demand

Lanwades Stud’s Sea The Moon (Ger) is another middle-distance stallion to find favour in the foal market this week, with 13 sold for an average of 46,692 gns (AU$88,247), from his 2019 stud fee of £15,000 (AU$27,000).

Byerley Stud’s February-foaled filly out of the Galileo (Ire) mare Garabelle (Ire) was the selection of John Cullinan of Horse Park Stud at 60,000 gns (AU$113,400). Lot 1045 is a half-sister to the Listed-placed Bella Vita (GB) (Aussie Rules {USA}) and was bred by Shoreham Stud.

“He should only continue improving,” said Cullinan. “We have had a couple by Sea The Moon and we liked them; they are straightforward horses. The stallion is one of the current upwardly-mobile sires.”

He added, “The mare has also had a black-type runner and is a Galileo mare; it is hard to get stock out of good Galileo mares at my level.”

Remarkable strength

Assessing the market for the first of this year’s foal sales in Europe, Edmond Mahony said, “We felt that the relative strength of the Tattersalls October Yearling Sales would provide a solid platform for the December Foals and this has been borne out by another 2020 sale at Park Paddocks which has held up remarkably well under the current circumstances, and particularly considering the continued widespread travel restrictions.

“Despite having the smallest Tattersalls December Foal catalogue since 2001, with 191 fewer foals catalogued than last year, the Sale has achieved turnover just over 10 per cent below last year’s lofty returns and single-digit declines in average and median. Not for the first time this year we can reflect on a market which has displayed extraordinary and commendable resilience, most graphically illustrated by a clearance rate which compares favourably not only with 2019, but also with the majority of recent renewals of Europe’s premier foal Sale.”

He continued, “Trade has been competitive throughout the week, starting with sustained demand for the yearlings and flowing consistently through four days of the cream of the British and Irish foal crop. As ever, the Sale has been dominated by pinhookers and we applaud them for their huge contribution, but even more so in this strangest of years. The Sale has been conducted under the strictest of health protocols and the compliance and awareness of all the rules and regulations has been admirable, as has the acceptance that we have not been able to provide the full Tattersalls sales experience in the current environment.

“Nevertheless, we have sold 64 foals for 100,000 gns (AU$189,000) or more this week, including Airlie Stud’s outstanding sale-topping Dubawi colt, whose 700,000-gns (AU$1.323 million) price tag is the second highest for a colt foal at this fixture. In addition to the individual highlights, we have had widespread participation, some of it online, from buyers from throughout Europe, Japan, North America and the Gulf region, all of which gives encouragement as we turn our attention to the annual showcase of Europe’s finest breeding stock at the Tattersalls December Mares Sale.”

Article courtesy of Emma Berry TDN

Above: Starspangledbanner standing at Rosemont Stud

Achieving and maintaining a stallion in appropriate body condition tops the list of nutritional concerns for stallion managers. Too often, stallions become ribby because of breeding efforts or anxiety, or obese due to spring grass and inactivity.

Body Condition

Priming a stallion’s weight for breeding season starts well before the first mare of the year requires semen. Like all horses, stallions are individuals and should be fed with their specific metabolism in mind. “Some stallions can maintain weight throughout the year on forage and a ration balancer, even when covering many mares, while others can get so worked up about breeding that they melt away their fat reserves,” explained Kathleen Crandell, Ph.D., a nutritionist for Kentucky Equine Research.

For stallions that maintain weight during breeding season, starting the season with a body condition score (BCS) of 5 or 5.5 is ideal. On the flip side, for stallions that drop weight as the breeding season progresses, beginning the season with a BCS of 6.5-7 may be the only way to keep the stallion in reasonable weight. During the breeding season, weight should be monitored weekly or biweekly and appropriate dietary adjustments made.

Obesity is no ally for a stallion. Repercussions of excessive body weight are numerous: diminished libido, subfertility, increased strain on the joints of the hindquarters, and possible cardiovascular issues. When chronically overconditioned, stallions may not have the stamina to breed a full book of mares. Just as excess weight can make a person more sedentary, so it is with stallions–their minds may say “go,” but their bodies say “no.”

Diet Considerations

“Matching dietary energy intake with energy expenditure is the way to control body condition,” said Crandell. According to Nutrient Requirements of Horses, stallions have greater energy needs than mares and geldings, even when they’re not breeding. “Hormones can influence metabolic rate and cause stallions to have a higher energy requirement at maintenance than other horses.”

How often a stallion is asked to breed affects energy requirements, as does the horse’s focus and disposition. Some stallions take breeding in stride with few behavioral changes, while others get really worked up when mares are nearby, wasting calories calling to mares, stall-walking, or pacing the fenceline. “In general, the energy requirement increases by about 20-25% during the breeding season, equivalent to the difference in an idle lifestyle and light work,” explained Crandell.

Above all, the diet should provide ample amounts of a good-quality forage. Additional caloric needs can then be met through the use of a concentrate. For those easy keepers, the concentrate may be a ration balancer, which will augment the nutrients found in forage. Others need larger amounts of a well-fortified, energy-dense feed to maintain weight. In choosing a feed, adequate but not excessive protein is important, as the requirement for protein increases only slightly with breeding and is usually covered by the increase in feed intake.

“The way energy is delivered to stallions makes a difference and may help diminish or add to anxiety. For nervous, tightly-wound stallions, providing a diet high in digestible fiber and fat instead of high in starch can increase the caloric intake without increased starch, which can make some horses nervous,” Crandell said.

Stallions that lose their appetite with the work of breeding may need a calorie-dense performance feed, which should be high in fat. Many performance feeds are textured and include molasses, which is palatable to finicky eaters. If the horse is not on fresh green grass, supplemental natural vitamin E may be warranted, particularly if feeding a high-fat diet. Choose a natural-source, water-soluble vitamin E, like Nano-E.

Targeted Supplementation

Routine supplementation with high-quality supplements can help stallions in the breeding shed.

One supplement endorsed by several stallion stations is fish oil, due to its favorable omega-3 fatty acid profile, which includes docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA). Research has made clear the benefits of DHA for stallions. “Though DHA won’t make an infertile stallion fertile, it can help with diminished motility, particularly with cooled semen. In addition to its benefits to semen, it helps with lubrication of joints, so stallions may feel better about mounting and breeding mares,” Crandell said. One effective marine-derived omega-3 supplement on the market is EO-3.

One study suggested that DHA appeared to be better absorbed when the diet contained a source of supplemental fat, so feeding either a high-fat concentrate or adding a little vegetable oil (soybean, canola) to the diet is recommended.

In early breeding season, when pasture might not be available to stallions, vitamin E supplementation should be considered. “Not only will supplementation meet vitamin E requirements for horses consuming hay or other preserved forage, it may have some beneficial effects on fertility,” explained Crandell. Nanodispersion technology confers rapid and superior bioavailability, so look for vitamin E supplements with this feature, such as Nano-E.

Breeding places much strain on joints, especially those in the hind limbs. Joint pain can limit a stallion’s willingness to breed. To help protect joints, high-quality joint supplements, such as Synovate HA and KER-Flex, can be given. In Australia, look for Synovate HA and Glucos-A-Flex.

Above: Authentic, with John Velazquez up, wins the Grade 1 Breeders’ Cup Classic at Keeneland Racecourse in Lexington, KY, USA. Nov 7, 2020. Photography by Jamie Newell / Racingfotos.com.

With likely Horse of the Year Authentic (USA) (Into Mischief {USA}) recently retired to stud, the Bob Baffert barn wasted no time unveiling its next speedy superstar by the nation’s leading sire as the China Horse Club and WinStar Farm’s Life is Good (USA) (Into Mischief {USA}) demolished his competition to become a no-brainer ‘TDN Rising Star’.

The bay made all the running at Del Mar on Sunday and he was always in complete control and to streak home by 9.5l.

Life Is Good, who was a US$525,000 (AU$717,000) Keeneland September Yearling Sale buy, is bred on the same cross as promising young sire Practical Joke (USA) (Into Mischief {USA}). His dam, herself a US$435,000 (AU$594,000) September buy, never won in five tries but hit the board in maiden special weights in both Kentucky and Arkansas.

Life Is Good’s second dam is stakes winner Bonnie Blue Flag (USA) (Mineshaft {USA}), who sold for US$1.5 million (AU$2.05 million) in 2011, but just US$15,000 (AU$20,500) last November in foal to California Chrome (USA) at the age of 12 after having little success with her produce on the track.

Article courtesy of TDN

Above: Sneaky Five

The G1-winning dam of unbeaten 2YO filly Sneaky Five is among several high quality offerings in the latest Inglis Digital Online Sale that is now live for bidding.

Small Minds (Canny Lad), a winner of the G1 Schweppes Oaks, has produced three foals to race and all are winners with two at Stakes level, headlined by Sneaky Five (Fastnet Rock) who claimed the Inglis Banner at Moonee Valley on debut, before a dominant win in the $1 million Golden Gift.

Undoubtedly one of the most exciting 2YOs in the country, Sneaky Five is now being aimed at the 2021 Inglis Millennium and Golden Slipper.

Small Minds is offered by Goldin Farms in foal to dual G1 winner Grunt (O’Reilly) and her next offspring is a yearling full brother to Sneaky Five.

The exciting addition of Small Minds to the November (Late) Online catalogue, comes on the back of Segenhoe Valley – dam of Shelby Cobra – selling for $325,000 in the November (Early) Sale, a record for a broodmare on the platform.

Small Minds is joined in the catalogue by her other daughter Perfect Number (Onemorenomore), a winner over 1000m, offered with a Power (Oasis Dream) filly at foot.

Other catalogue highlights include:

• Best Ever – 3YO colt by Snitzel out of champion mare More Joyous and winner on debut at Pakenham, offered by Strawberry Hill Stud

• Danon Liberty – Stakes winner in Japan, offered as a stallion prospect

• Epic Love – 3YO half sister to Maygrove, from the family of The Candy Man and Phrases, offered by Laurel Oak

• Esteem Pride – unraced 3YO filly by Pride of Dubai, half sister to Great Esteem and High Esteem from a big European family, offered by Cressfield

• Fast Melody – A maiden 4YO gelding placed in five of 10 starts, offered by Gai Waterhouse & Adrian Bott Racing

• Get On Board – Unbeaten in two starts, a Country Cups prospect offered by Turangga Farm

• Kensington Avenue – unraced 3YO half-sister to Stakes winner Ferocious, offered as a breeding proposition only by Sheamus Mills Bloodstock

• Miss Severina – Foxwedge half sister to Brave Song, offered in foal to Your Song by Newhaven Park

• Mrs Maisel – 3YO Hinchinbrook filly trained by Mark Newnham, a winner at Wyong and placed on five other occasions in 10 starts

• 2.5% Share in Our Candidate – G3 placed entire by Camelot trained by Kris Lees

• Romantic Whisper – 5YO daughter of Medaglia d’Oro and multiple Stakes winner Love To Tell, a city winner offered by Gai Waterhouse & Adrian Bott Racing

• Royal Raine – Thorn Park half sister to a G3 winner, offered with a Shamus Award filly at foot, her 2YO filly is with Ciaron Maher and David Eustace

• Writtle – 3YO Written Tycoon gelding that has run 3rd and 2nd respectively in two recent jump outs, offered by Busuttin Racing

The November (Late) Online Sale is now open for bidding, with the final countdown commencing at 3pm (AEDT) on Wednesday, November 25.

To view the catalogue or register to bid, CLICK HERE.

Article courtesy of Breednet

Above: Swettenham stud sire Toronado (Swettenham Stud)

Swettenham Stud shuttler Toronado (Ire) is quietly building his record, and Sales and Nominations Manager Sam Matthews said he could already have a full book for the 2021 season.

Swettenham Stud’s roster-topper Toronado was already receiving strong support from breeders before siring a stakes double on one of the biggest days on the racing calendar.

Progressive 3-year-old gelding Shelby Cobra added the Listed The Amanda Elliott to his record at just his third start before 4-year-old mare Affair To Remember finally got her nose in front on the line to win the G2 Matriarch S. on Derby Day, to become his third Southern Hemisphere stakes winner.

Both horses are again set to line up on Saturday with Shelby Cobra in the VOBIS Gold Eureka Stockade and Affair To Remember in the Listed Ballarat Cup, and Sam Matthews, Sales and Nominations Manager for Swettenham, said the farm was delighted to see Toronado’s stock perform on the biggest stage.

“It was obviously very exciting for him to have one stakes winner during the Flemington carnival but two in a day was just exceptional,” Matthews told TDN AusNZ.

“It was obviously very exciting for him to have one stakes winner during the Flemington carnival but two in a day was just exceptional.” – Sam Matthews

“It just great for all of those people that have supported Toronado throughout the last few seasons, including this season, and gives them that extra bit of confidence when they go to the sales early next year, that they’re going to get a great result.”

While he has been able to produce some talented juveniles such as Prince Of Sussex, his progeny are improving in their 3 and 4-year-old seasons which Matthews said is a typical trait of the High Chaparral (Ire) sires.

“He can throw a 2-year-old with the likes of Prince Of Sussex, but we’re finding with the High Chaparral line with Dundeel, So You Think and Toronado, they seem to get better and better at 3-years-old and 4-years-old,” Matthews said.

“But he can throw something like Shelby Cobra who is very good over a short trip as well as something like Affair To Remember who can get over a bit more ground, so I think it’s the variety of distance ranges that makes him the exceptional stallion that he is.”

Increased support

With his stock improving with age, he has only received increased support from breeders.

2019 was his fifth season standing in Australia and he covered his biggest ever book in the Southern Hemisphere with 195 mares.

After being fully booked two weeks after his service fee was announced in 2020, Matthews said his popularity is only growing and the quality of mares coming to him is getting better each year.

“Obviously when you look at him compared to some other horses, even the ones in this crop, he covered good books and really, really good books of quality mares without covering too many,” he said.

“Being a shuttle horse, he obviously has his Northern Hemisphere time as well so we do protect him with his numbers but this year’s book of mares is the best quality book of mares that he’s had so he’ll only go from strength to strength.

“This year’s book of mares is the best quality book of mares that he’s had so he’ll only go from strength to strength.” – Sam Matthews

“Obviously in his first year and year’s two and three, the mare numbers weren’t quite as big as what they are now and the mare quality was good but it wasn’t where it is now.

“As we go through the next two, three and four years and start to see better quality mares producing better horses, I’d think that if he’s not the best stallion in Victoria, I’d be very surprised.”

While the demand is high to get a nomination for Toronado, Matthews said Swettenham is prioritising those that supported the young stallion in his earlier years at stud.

“He was fully booked within about two weeks of announcing his service fee this year and his fertility has been exceptional,” he said. “We’ve probably knocked back more than three times the mares that he has covered – we’ve knocked back about 600 and it was just purely first in best dressed and we wanted to make sure that whoever supported him early got a spot.

“We’ve already had a lot of enquires about trying to get nominations for him next year so we’ll make sure that those who have supported him can get in first but if we were to say that ‘yes, you can book in right now for next year’, we could have filled him already for the season that hasn’t even started.”

With Written Tycoon’s relocation to the Hunter Valley for the foreseeable future, there is a spot for a stallion to step up and fill his shoes as Victoria’s leading sire and Matthews can’t see why Toronado can’t be the one to do that.

“I think between Toronado, Brazen Beau and probably Shamus Award as well, they’re all doing an exceptional job,” he said.

“Obviously Toronado and Brazen Beau are both in the same age-group with their crops and I think they’re both doing great things for Victoria. I think they’ll continue to grow into that next-level but we’re always looking for the next level stallion ourselves and I think Victoria needs that $40,000 to $60,000 stallion.”

Article courtesy of Georgie Dennis TDN

We have been notified of an issue that has faced thoroughbred breeders and mare owners in Victoria during Autumn last year.This issue is around severe lesions on areas of white hair on the horses and is associated with grazing of lucerne pastures infested with Cowpea aphids. The lesions require veterinary treatment if not identified early and horses are not removed from pastures. It is imperative that with the recent rains that breeders and owners are checking paddocks for Cowpea aphids.

In early 2020 two thoroughbred horse studs in northern VIC reported cases of severe photosensitisation associated with grazing horses on lucerne or lucerne mix pastures in Autumn 2020. This photosensitisation may be due to an outbreak of cowpea aphid on the lucerne pastures. However, it is not yet known if it was due to the ingestion of the cowpea aphid itself or the ingestion of the cowpea aphid infested lucerne. There was no foetal loss associated with the infestation, however there was concern around possible foetal loss due to stabling and treatment of the photosensitisation.

This fact sheet aims to help breeders identify and manage cowpea aphid and take appropriate measures to avoid photosensitisation in grazing horses.

For the fact sheet and more information, click here 

 

As we are all too aware, the impacts of Coronavirus has meant 2020 has been a challenging year. Whether it has been maintaining a business in lockdown, being prevented from seeing family and friends or the stress of the economic uncertainty, there have been more reasons for people to feel anxious than before.

To help farm owners and managers of staff better deal with the challenge of mental health, Thoroughbred Breeders Australia has set up a webinar with mental health educator Pippa Baker. Pippa is known to TBA as she delivers mental health first aid training to our Fast Track students each year.

Pippa will provide some easy steps for supporting staff over the next few months (especially leading into Christmas), and some general tips on fostering good mental health within your team.

There are two session times to choose from: Monday 30th November 5pm (AEST) or Tuesday 8th December 4pm (AEST) and you can register for your preferred day by clicking on the button below:

Register here 

The webinar runs for one hour and we are encouraging all farms to get involved and register. Some of the topics that Pippa will touch on include:

  • When should you be concerned?
  • Deciding whether to talk to the person
  • Planning your approach
  • How to have the conversation
  • Providing support and information as a Manager

You can read more about Pippa online here.

If you have any questions or would like further information on the webinars, please contact Cecelia at cecelia@tbaus.com.

Above: Affair to Remember taking out second place with Mark Zahra in the Sportsbet Ballarat Cup  (Natasha Morello/Racing Photos)

Having been a prominent divorce lawyer it perhaps seemed only fitting that well known South Australian breeder and racing identity David Peacock would name a horse Affair To Remember.

But the 74-year-old Peacock, who is a former South Australian Jockey Club chairman, is quick to dismiss any link with his previous profession and the naming of the four-year-old mare by Swettenham Stud stallion Toronado.

He explains that the mare, which finished second to Irish Flame in last Saturday’s Ballarat Cup, was in fact named after a 1957 film.

With four wins and six minor places from her 16 starts, Peacock said Affair To Remember has developed an enormous following in Australia, particularly Victoria.

“I bred her and leased her out to myself and some friends so we can have some fun and I said to one of them that she is going to be a well backed horse and he said why is that,” Peacock laughed.

“Most people of my age with remember the film with Deborah Kerr and Cary Gant, An Affair to Remember. It was made in 1957.”

Peacock said his mother Gwen loved films and her favourite was Waterloo Bridge (1931) but that name was already taken but she also loved the film An Affair to Remember so he thought he’d name the mare after the movie.

“Thankfully it’s been a name that has resonated out there in race land,” he said.

Trained at Ballarat by Dan O’Sullivan, Affair To Remember went into the Ballarat Cup as the $3.90 favourite after winning the Group 2 Matriarch Stakes (2000m) at Flemington during the Spring Carnival.

Peacock said the mare looked gone during the running of the Ballarat Cup but ran home strongly and got into some trouble with So Si Bon at the wrong time and was probably unlucky to go down by the narrowest of margins.

“These things happen but we got 90 grand for running second,” he said.

Peacock’s association with O’Sullivan goes back to when the trainer was based in Adelaide and the pair had plenty of success.

He was an owner of So Gorgeous (Brief Truce x Crowning Jewel) which O’Sullivan trained in Group 2 victories in the Ascot Vale Stakes and Edward Manifold Stakes, and Group 3 wins in the Tranquil Star Stakes and Adelaide Guineas. The horse also won the Listed Quezette Stakes.

“So we go back a long way,” Peacock said.

Peacock describes Affair To Remember as a bit “gut wrenching” to watch as she “ambles out of the gates” and almost always comes down the extreme outside.

But he says in last Saturday’s Ballarat Cup she went in between horses and was incredibly brave.

Peacock said his mother also loved her horses and they raced some good ones together, with the best being grey stallion Mikado which won 13 races, including the Yan Yean Stakes which was run on Melbourne Cup Day.

“I’ve been breeding horses for about 50 years and I just love it,” he said.

“I mean it’s like being inoculated with a virus, you never get rid of it do you?”

Peacock’s seven broodmares are sent from his Macclesfield farm in SA to mainly Victorian stallions.

As well as Affair To Remember, he had got another four horses by Toronado, including two full sisters and also another out of Group 1 placed mare Bahamas which he also raced and bred.

Affair To Remember’s dam, St Trinians (Black Hawk x Besotted) produced the lightly raced Bahamas (Teofilo) which finished third in the Australasian Oaks in 2015.

“St Trinians was a pretty good horse over here in Adelaide and she won eight races and three of which were good Listed races,” Peacock said.

“We have done quite well with there but she has had a lot of bad luck unfortunately with some of her foals.”

Peacock’s love of Toronado came after he saw the stallion race live in the same race as Dawn Approach which stood five seasons in Australia.

“I happened to be in England on holiday and there was a fabulous horse called Dawn Approach which was just no good here in Australia as a stallion,” he said,

“I hold the world record for the two highest Dawn Approaches sold anywhere in the world.

“Anyway, I was in England and had a loose day and I thought I might go to glorious Goodwood and had reciprocal rights and all that sort of nonsense and the main race of the day was the Sussex Stakes.

“And Toronado came from the clouds to just pip Dawn Approach on the finishing post and I fell in love with him that day and when young Adam Sangster brought him over I rang him and said I have to send a mare to that horse.

“I think I have sent one for every season that the horse has been here.”

Peacock is famous for his Discreet line of horses.

Peacock said there are many relations of his grand Group 3 winning mare She’s Discreet (Euclase x Halo Again) which produced three stakes winners – Forever Discreet, I’m Discreet and Very Discreet.

All of She’s Discreet’s 13 foals raced – and won. The mare’s dam, Halo Again, died at 33-years-old on Peacock’s farm last year after being retired from stud duties in 2015. Halo Again, also bred by Peacock, produced five stakes winners.

Peacock was chairman of the SAJC for four years and was on the board for a total of 15 years.

As well as sending mares to Toronado this season, he also sent two mares to new Victorian Darley shuttle stallion Blue Point.

Peacock splits his race horses between trainers O’Sullivan and Phillip Stokes who has stables in South Australian and Victoria. With Affair To Remember now in the paddock, Peacock said two he has with Stokes in Victoria, Highly Discreet (Street Boss x Very Discreet) and Seemingly Discreet (Sepoy x Just Discreet) are the best he has racing at the moment.

His breeding plan is to sell the colts and race the fillies and says that two years ago he was lucky to get $1.15 million for a Brazen Beau colt which is unraced but won a barrier trial at Warwick Farm last week.

Named Border Control, the three-year-old is out of Peacock’s mare Just Discreet (Exceed and Excel) and trained by Team Hawkes.

“We sell the colts if we possibly can to keep the taxman happy and by and large we race the fillies ourselves in the hope that we will get one good enough to go to stud,” he said.

“All the Discreet horses started off 45 years ago with a mare called Cassie (Holborn x Lido Lady).”

Affair To Remember, which has now been sent to the paddock and could be set for next year’s All Star Mile, is obviously a valuable mare after winning the Group 2 Matriarch Stakes (2000m).

Peacock said Melbourne bloodstock agent Sheamus Mills offered him $650,000 for the mare.

“I said to him thanks for the offer of the deposit,” Peacock joked.

“He got back to me with an offer of $850,000 and I thought about it for a week and he said you will have to make a decision because my man needs to know.”

Peacock said a friend told him he’d break O’Sullivan’s heart if the sold the mare.

“I rang Dan and said I’m very cross with you, but I have decided not to sell this horse,” he quipped.

“And Dan, who is too a nice a man, said thanks.

“I rang dear, old Sheamus and said I can’t sell her as I’d break Dan’s heart.”

Affair To Remember has won $512,000 in prizemoney and is worth much more when as a broodmare when her racing days are over.

And she could have added to an imposing record set by Peacock. After winning the Edward Manifold Stakes with three horses he raced and two of them he bred – So Gorgeous, Maybe Discreet and Seemingly Discreet – a minor setback stopped Affair to Remember competing in the race.

With O’Sullivan confident he can get a good 1600m victory out of the mare, Peacock said the popularity of the mare should get her into the All Star Mile where the field is uniquely decided on a public vote.

Above: Tradewind ridden by Jye McNeil wins the Magnum Equine VOBIS Gold Eureka Stockade at Sportsbet-Ballarat Racecourse  (Reg Ryan/Racing Photos)

As is often the case in racing, things didn’t actually go to plan for the bulk of the runners in the rich VOBIS Gold Eureka Stockade (1400m) on Ballarat Cup Day.

In the field of seven, Swettenham Stud was represented by two three-year-olds – last start Listed winner Shelby Cobra (Toronado) and South Australian visitor Tradewind (Trust In A Gust).

The Mike Moroney trained Shelby Cobra was sent out as the $1.65 favourite, while Morphettville trainer Ryan Balfour’s Tradewind was the $31 outsider.

Shelby Cobra finished a disappointing second last, while Tradewind scored by a short neck from Sirileo to pick up the $96,250 winning prizemoney, plus an owners’ bonus of $23,000.

It was the colt’s second win from his four starts.

Tradewind was bred by Victorian Jen Fitzpatrick and foaled down at Rushton Park and sold for $18,000 through their draft at the 2019 Magic Millions Adelaide yearling sale.

With owners finally allowed back on the track, there was no happier person at Ballarat than Jen who bred the colt from Bikini Dancer (Bernardini x Post Thyme).

Originally trained at Cranbourne by Mick Kent, Jen became a part owner of Bikini Dancer late in the mare’s racing career when she was bought by Chris Hyland who raced her four times before being retired.

Jen also kept a share in Tradewind when the colt went under the hammer.

“I am the breeder and an owner,” a proud Jen said.

“I also got the VOBIS nominator’s bonus and it is an absolutely wonderful scheme and I’ve always nominated my horses for the VOBIS scheme because it is just such a great incentive for us breeders.

“And we are so proud that he won the same race that Trust In A Gust won seven years ago. To have him emulate his sire made us all so proud.”

Jen also bred and races the first foal out of Bikini Dancer, Reard (Reward For Effort) which has won two races from eight starts.

With two wins from each of the foals, Jen is full of praise for Bikini Dancer.

“And I just met her new foal on Sunday as it was the first time I could get out of Melbourne back up to the country,” Jen said.

“She has got a beautiful Magnus filly now.”

Jen bought Bikini Dancer at the sales when the mare was retired as she was impressed with the pedigree and wanted to breed from her.

At the moment, Jen also has another broodmare Kobe Queen (Fusaichi Pegus x Queen Isolt) and has had a few others over the years which is now surprise as her uncle and aunty, Ray and Nola Thompson, owned a Scone property which is now the broodmare farm for Arrowfield.

“I was always involved in breeding through my aunt and uncle and it was a wonderful start for me,” Jen said.

“I learnt a lot from them and have been so grateful in recent years to Sally Watkins at Willaroon for the care she gives to my mares and their progeny.

“And I was so happy that Ryan Balfour bought the horse because he is such a good trainer and for me it’s the future going forward that is the most important thing for my horses.”

And Bikini Dancer was booked into Trust In A Gust this week and Jen is hoping everything goes to plan.

She said Swettenham Stud’s Adam Sangster sent her a lovely message after Tradewind’s victory in Adelaide.

“I have always loved Trust In A Gust as a racehorse and going to Swettenham on their open day I went along with an open mind and I was looking for two stallions for my mares,” Jen said.

“All of the stallions were so impressive but I was really impressed with Trust In A Gust and he’d just let down and he looked absolutely amazing.

“I thought he was a very good match for Bikini Dancer and the pedigrees all worked out and my other mare went to Toronado.”

Jen said another of the owners, Brad Thomas of X Factor Pedigrees, advised Balfour to buy Tradewind because of the “perfect pedigree match.”

Thomas also bought into the colt and told four of his mates to also take a share.

He also was a part owner of the dual Group 1 winning Trust In A Gust and is a Ballarat local who admits to having a slight biased toward the stallion when looking at his progeny.

Thomas said with his genetic rating system, Trust In A Gust came up with what he described as 100-plus with Bikini Dancer.

“I have an association with Dave Mee of Pinhook Bloodstock and he gets me to do the ratings on his yearlings and he was at the sale and I was home at Ballarat doing all the work on the catalogue,” Thomas said.

“I said to Dave you need to buy this horse, find someone to buy it and he said I think Ryan Balfour might buy so I’ll go talk to him.”

Balfour wanted a commitment before buying the colt that he would have owners so Thomas guaranteed to take 50 per cent. Jen was always going to stick with the colt if given the opportunity.

Jen said they all realised that Trust In A Gust’s progeny would be three-year-olds and she believes he’ll be a good stallion who will hopefully get more support after Tradewind’s victory.

Tradewind was heading back to Adelaide on Tuesday where he will be spelled and will return for the autumn where he’ll target some more VOBIS races.

Rushton Park’s Kayley Johnson said Tradewind was foaled down at their property and then sent back to Willaroon Thoroughbreds where the foal was raised prepared for the yearling sale.

The colt was then sold through Rushton Park’s draft and it was memorable for Kayley who said Jen loves her horses dearly.

“She cried her eyes out when we sold him,” she said.

“She just loves them so dearly and was very keen to keep a share in him.”

Jen admits she has been overwhelmed in recent days and said Tradewind’s victory just reinforced what a wonderful industry she is involved in.

Above: Tradewind ridden by Jye McNeil wins the Magnum Equine VOBIS Gold Eureka Stockade at Sportsbet-Ballarat Racecourse  (Reg Ryan/Racing Photos)

As is often the case in racing, things didn’t actually go to plan for the bulk of the runners in the rich VOBIS Gold Eureka Stockade (1400m) on Ballarat Cup Day.

In the field of seven, Swettenham Stud was represented by two three-year-olds – last start Listed winner Shelby Cobra (Toronado) and South Australian visitor Tradewind (Trust In A Gust).

The Mike Moroney trained Shelby Cobra was sent out as the $1.65 favourite, while Morphettville trainer Ryan Balfour’s Tradewind was the $31 outsider.

Shelby Cobra finished a disappointing second last, while Tradewind scored by a short neck from Sirileo to pick up the $96,250 winning prizemoney, plus an owners’ bonus of $23,000.

It was the colt’s second win from his four starts.

Tradewind was bred by Victorian Jen Fitzpatrick and foaled down at Sally Watkins’ Willaroon Thoroughbreds and sold for $18,000 through Kayley and David Johnson’s Rushton Park draft at the 2019 Magic Millions Adelaide yearling sale.

With owners finally allowed back on the track, there was no happier person at Ballarat than Jen who bred the colt from Bikini Dancer (Bernardini x Post Thyme).

Originally trained at Cranbourne by Mick Kent, Jen became a part owner of Bikini Dancer late in the mare’s racing career when she was bought by Chris Hyland who raced her four times before being retired.

Jen also kept a share in Tradewind when the colt went under the hammer.

“I am the breeder and an owner,” a proud Jen said.

“I also got the VOBIS nominator’s bonus and it is an absolutely wonderful scheme and I’ve always nominated my horses for the VOBIS scheme because it is just such a great incentive for us breeders.

“And we are so proud that he won the same race that Trust In A Gust won seven years ago. To have him emulate his sire made us all so proud.”

Jen also bred and races the first foal out of Bikini Dancer, Reard (Reward For Effort) which has won two races from eight starts.

With two wins from each of the foals, Jen is full of praise for Bikini Dancer.

“And I just met her new foal on Sunday as it was the first time I could get out of Melbourne back up to the country,” Jen said.

“She has got a beautiful Magnus filly now.”

Jen bought Bikini Dancer at the sales when the mare was retired as she was impressed with the pedigree and wanted to breed from her.

At the moment, Jen also has another broodmare Kobe Queen (Fusaichi Pegus x Queen Isolt) and has had a few others over the years which is now surprise as her uncle and aunty, Ray and Nola Thompson, owned a Scone property which is now the broodmare farm for Arrowfield.

“I was always involved in breeding through my aunt and uncle and it was a wonderful start for me,” Jen said.

“I learnt a lot from them and have been so grateful in recent years to Sally Watkins at Willaroon for the care she gives to my mares and their progeny.

“And I was so happy that Ryan Balfour bought the horse because he is such a good trainer and for me it’s the future going forward that is the most important thing for my horses.”

And Bikini Dancer was booked into Trust In A Gust this week and Jen is hoping everything goes to plan.

She said Swettenham Stud’s Adam Sangster sent her a lovely message after Tradewind’s victory in Adelaide.

“I have always loved Trust In A Gust as a racehorse and going to Swettenham on their open day I went along with an open mind and I was looking for two stallions for my mares,” Jen said.

“All of the stallions were so impressive but I was really impressed with Trust In A Gust and he’d just let down and he looked absolutely amazing.

“I thought he was a very good match for Bikini Dancer and the pedigrees all worked out and my other mare went to Toronado.”

Jen said another of the owners, Brad Thomas of X Factor Pedigrees, advised Balfour to buy Tradewind because of the “perfect pedigree match.”

Thomas also bought into the colt and told four of his mates to also take a share.

He also was a part owner of the dual Group 1 winning Trust In A Gust and is a Ballarat local who admits to having a slight biased toward the stallion when looking at his progeny.

Thomas said with his genetic rating system, Trust In A Gust came up with what he described as 100-plus with Bikini Dancer.

“I have an association with Dave Mee of Pinhook Bloodstock and he gets me to do the ratings on his yearlings and he was at the sale and I was home at Ballarat doing all the work on the catalogue,” Thomas said.

“I said to Dave you need to buy this horse, find someone to buy it and he said I think Ryan Balfour might buy so I’ll go talk to him.”

Balfour wanted a commitment before buying the colt that he would have owners so Thomas guaranteed to take 50 per cent. Jen was always going to stick with the colt if given the opportunity.

Jen said they all realised that Trust In A Gust’s progeny would be three-year-olds and she believes he’ll be a good stallion who will hopefully get more support after Tradewind’s victory.

Tradewind was heading back to Adelaide on Tuesday where he will be spelled and will return for the autumn where he’ll target some more VOBIS races.

Rushton Park’s Kayley Johnson said Tradewind was foaled down at their property and then sent back to Willaroon Thoroughbreds where the foal was raised prepared for the yearling sale.

The colt was then sold through Rushton Park’s draft and it was memorable for Kayley who said Jen loves her horses dearly.

“She cried her eyes out when we sold him,” she said.

“She just loves them so dearly and was very keen to keep a share in him.”

Jen admits she has been overwhelmed in recent days and said Tradewind’s victory just reinforced what a wonderful industry she is involved in.

If your horse isn’t performing well due to joint inflammation and pain, a veterinarian may suggest injecting an anti-inflammatory corticosteroid into the affected joint. Four products currently have approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for intra-articular use, including isoflupredone acetate (IPA). Surprisingly, little data has been collected on the impact of IPA within the joint or its duration of action.

“Based on research involving two other intra-articular medications, methylprednisolone and triamcinolone, equine experts* suggest that IPA may actually exert beneficial effects long after it can be detected in the blood,” explained Laura Petroski, B.V.M.S., veterinarian for Kentucky Equine Research (KER).

To test this theory, Knych and colleagues from the School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California, Davis, devised a system to measure the effect and duration of effect of intra-articular corticosteroid drugs. Specifically, the system measured the expression of various pro-inflammatory mediators and degradative enzymes that can harm the joint.

“Previous studies on triamcinolone showed that this particular intra-articular corticosteroid had a long duration of action, exerting beneficial effects long after the medication could be detected in a horse’s bloodstream,” relayed Petroski.

In the current study, 12 healthy horses undergoing a stringent exercise regime received either 8 mg of IPA into the radiocarpal joint (the topmost joint of the knee) or just saline. Blood and synovial fluid samples were subsequently collected at specific time points up to 42 days following administration. Key findings included:

  • In treated horses, IPA levels in blood and synovial fluid were below the “level of detection” between 14 and 21 days following intra-articular administration;
  • Compared to the expression of various genes at baseline, immediately prior to IPA administration, altered expression—both increased and decreased—was noted for thousands of genes in synovial fluid; and
  • Of those, a significant increase in the expression of the Annexin A1 gene was noted up to 42 days after IPA administration. This gene produces a potent anti-inflammatory protein that blocks key steps in the arachadonic acid cascade and was not increased in the control horses;
  • In addition, significant decreases in the levels of the inflammatory mediator interleukin 23A as well as enzymes that degrade articular cartilage (matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 9) were noted for up to 42 days following treatment.
  • The researchers concluded that the results of this study advance understanding of the anti-inflammatory nature of intra-articular administration of IPA and that IPA appears to have a prolonged effect relative to detection time in the bloodstream and joint fluid.Either in lieu of or in addition to intra-articular corticosteroids, the use of certain oral joint health products can also help maximize the health of equine joints. Consider using high-quality products such as KER•Flex and Synovate HA to help maintain the health and integrity of the joint tissues, including the articular cartilage lining the ends of bones within joints.“In Australia, horse owners should look to Glucos-A-Flex, a blend of glucosamine hydrochloride, vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, for joint support,” recommended Petroski.

    Each of the four FDA-approved corticosteroid drugs has clear guidelines regarding the amount to be injected into a joint, the total amount used in the horse, and the number of hours or days the medication must be administered prior to competition to avoid a positive drug test result.

    *Knych, H.K., L. Harrison, N. Chouicha, et al. Expression of inflammatory and structural matrix genes in synovial fluid following intra-articular administration of isoflupredone acetate to exercised horses. Equine Veterinary Journal. In press.