Above: Joao Moreira winning on Scores of Fun in Hong Kong (photo Kenneth Chan)

A gelding bred by Hollylodge Thoroughbreds at Avenel had instant success in Hong Kong on Sunday.

Scores Of Fun, who started his career in Australia as Hottie Lamottie, made his debut for expatriate Australian trainer John Size after six trials in Hong Kong.

Starting at $4.10, the three-year-old gelding by Reward For Effort was ridden to a narrow victory by famed jockey, Joao Moreira.

Out of the mare Monatana Hilton, it was the gelding’s first race start.

Previously trained by Patrick Payne under the original name of Hottie Lamottie, the gelding finished fourth in a Cranbourne trial beaten by half a length last October.

He was then sold to Hong Kong after being bought by Price Bloodstock for $100,000 at the 2018 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

First prize for Sunday’s race at Sha Tin was nearly $110,000 (AUD).

Hollylodge’s Daniel Nevill said they bred Scores Of Fun for a client and sold him at the weanling sales.

“We sold him for $15,000 but the person who bought him later sold him for $100,000.” Nevill said.

“But that’s the way it is.”

Nevill said they still have the dam Montana Hilton, who has had three foals by Reward for Effort; two have now won, while the other has been placed.

“But this is definitely the best one,” he said.

“It was good to win at the first start in Hong Kong.”

Montana Hilton has a foal to Swettenham Stud stallion Trust In A Gust.

“She’ll be going back to Reward For Effort,” Nevill said.

“And then we’ll make a decision and see what this one does.

“We might sell her in foal or keep her for a bit longer. We’ll see what happens.

“The guy who bred her is an owner of Reward for Effort.”

Now 15 years-old, Montana Hilton (Brahms/Hanina) had 64 starts for nine wins, 12 seconds and five thirds.

Hollylodge also had some involvement with the Lindsay Park trained El Phoenix who broke the 1400m record on the synthetic track at Pakenham last Thursday.

El Phoenix recorded a time of 1:23.65.

“I only foaled him as I sold him as a weanling, but it was good result.” Nevill said.

Nevill said his farm had some really nice horses and we are just waiting for the live sales to re-open.

“I don’t think weanlings and yearlings are great for the online sales,” he said.

“People like to look at the horses.”

He believes they’ll be happy with what they see.

The equal highest priced yearling by Hong Kong champion Akeed Mofeed (GB), Like That made it two wins from there starts when saluting at Sha Tin on Sunday.

Like That powers clear for an easy win - image HKJC

Above: Like That powers clear for an easy win – image HKJC

Trained by John Moore and ridden by Zac Purton, two year-old gelding Like That raced to an easy length and a half win in the griffin plate over 1200m.

“He’s not beaten too much, in my opinion, they’re probably Class 4 and Class 5 horses,” Moore said.

“But he’s showing a bit of talent, he’s doing what he has to do and each run has been better – we’ll put him into a Class 3 1200-metre race next time and see if he can cope with the rise but he’ll have his work cut out for him in Class 3.

“I’ll keep him at 1200 metres because he’s still not the finished product. Physically, he looks quite forward for a two-year-old but his heart and lungs need development so he’s a work in progress.”

Like That was a $200,000 Magic Millions Adelaide purchase for Gary Moore Racing from the Goldin Farms draft.

Like That was bred by Goldin Farms and is the third winner from Calemore, a half-sister by More Than Ready (USA) to Group I winner Lady of the Pines.

Calemore has been married to Akeed Mofeed and been to him for the past five seasons.

The champion son of Dubawi is now at Swettenham Stud and is priced this spring at $16,500.

Article courtesy of Breednet

Above: 2019 Blue Diamond winner Tagaloa to stand at Yulong

If everything goes to plan, it won’t be too long before Yulong offers one of the biggest breeding operations in Victoria.

Already with two stallions on their roster, and Tagaloa set to join Grunt and Alabama Express at the end of his racing career, Yulong plans to offer breeders the choice of up to at least 10 stallions in the coming years.

Chinese billionaire Yuesheng Zhang has invested millions of dollars in his breeding and racing interests in Victoria. He has already made it clear that the huge investment in the industry will continue in the coming years.

The purchase of Grunt, Alabama Express and two year-old colt Tagaloa are just the start of Zhang’s entry into the stallion market.

His two foundation stallions will stand at Zhang’s Yulong Stud which he purchased from caravan king Gerry Ryan who previously operated the 450 acre property near Nagambie, known as Limerick Lane.

Also in Zhang’s horse property portfolio is the 210 acre Yulong Farm, which is set up for his ever increasing band of around 200 broodmares.

Yulong Park the 170-acre agistment property located at Bayles near Pakenham.

And Yulong is chasing further land opportunities near Nagambie.

As well as their recent stallion purchases, Yulong has been prominent at the recent Chairman’s Sale and digital online sale to purchase more broodmares.

Yulong’s chief operating officer Sam Fairgray said the new state of the art stallion facility at Yulong Stud is nearing completion and capable of accommodating up to 14 stallions.

“We have Grunt, Alabama Express and Tagaloa will most likely join our stallion roster either next year or the following year,” Fairgray said.

“We have now got up to 200 broodmares and it’s Mr Zhang’s vision to have a good stallion line-up which we will support with good quality mares.

“Alabama Express will get some really nice mares this year and we have got a couple of nice fillies retiring off the track which he will get.”

Fairgray said the Yulong vision was definitely to become a commercial operation to breed, rear and sell high class racehorses.

And having up to 10 resident stallions is also part of the Yulong vision, in addition to their expanding land capacity.

“We are just trying to do develop the farm with the right steps and stages,” Fairgray said.

Above: A view of the farm

“It will give Victorian breeders an opportunity to access high class stallions with the ability to keep their mares at home without needing to travel interstate.

“Mr Zhang really loves it and he is got a passion for it and he’ll be in it for a long time.

“He was quite adamant about setting up in Victoria and his two daughters are involved in the business who are based in Melbourne.”

At this stage there is no definite line of stallions being sought by Yulong. The focus is getting the stallions they believe will work with the Australian broodmare population.

Fairgray said the time frame for adding to Yulong’s stallion roster will look to be increasing their stallion numbers to five next year, eight the following year and then build it up to around the 10.

“That’s the aim, but it’s not just as easy as just saying that we are going to have that number because obviously you want to have a stallion that is going to be suitable,” he remarked.

“But Mr Zhang is very passionate about it and he knows what he wants to achieve.”

Fairgray said the plan was that all the yearlings from Yulong’s massive band of broodmares would all be offered for sale.

He said Yulong withdrew all of its yearlings from the Australian Easter Yearling Sale which turned into a digital sale because of the coronavirus.

“We are going to take them to round two and we had 14 entered for that first sale. We just withdrew them because people hadn’t had the opportunity to inspect the yearlings.” Fairgray said.

“But hopefully the way things are heading now, people will be able to inspect the yearlings and it will be a live auction up in Sydney.

“With yearlings especially, people need to be able to view them when they are paying large sums of money.

“But we will be definitely offering all the progeny for sale.

“We will still buy a few nice yearling fillies to try to help our broodmare band in years to come.”

The Yulong named horses are well known throughout the racecourses, with Zhang enjoying the racing side of the industry with a large racing team.

Yulong also export horses to China, but Fairgray said that market had obviously slowed down because of the restriction of flights to China, but is confident the market will pick up when air travel restrictions are lifted.

He said the Chinese market was starting to improve and grow.

“Despite the setback, I am confident the Chinese are getting interested in racing and understanding the whole dealing and sale process and racing,” Fairgray said.

“Going forward it is going to be important to us to be able to sell some of the yearlings in China.”

Yulong employs more than 50 people and that number will continue to rise in line with the company’s ever increasing horse population.

Fairgray said he would love to give some of the younger people in Victoria the opportunity to join Yulong so they could learn about the industry and then move on and better themselves at other farms.

It’s not just farms and horses that Yulong have been acquiring. They recently announced the appointment of highly respected stud manager Marcus Corban to a special projects role after spending more than 30 years as general manager of New Zealand’s Cambridge Stud.

While Yulong also have horses in the UK and America, the vision is clearly for success in the Australian and breeding industry before increasing their expansion into other countries.

Alabama Express (Redoute’s Choice – Lago Ovation) ridden by Michael Dee wins the G1 C.F. Orr Stakes (1400m)  at Caulfield Racecourse. 
© The Image is Everything – Bronwen Healy & Darren Tindale Photography

If everything goes to plan, it won’t be too long before Yulong offers one of the biggest breeding operations in Victoria.

Already with two stallions on their roster, and Tagaloa set to join Grunt and Alabama Express at the end of his racing career, Yulong plans to offer breeders the choice of up to at least 10 stallions in the coming years.

Chinese billionaire Yuesheng Zhang has invested millions of dollars in his breeding and racing interests in Victoria. He has already made it clear that the huge investment in the industry will continue in the coming years.

The purchase of Grunt, Alabama Express and two year-old colt Tagaloa are just the start of Zhang’s entry into the stallion market.

His two foundation stallions will stand their first seasons at Zhang’s Yulong Stud which he purchased from caravan king Gerry Ryan who previously operated the 450 acre property near Nagambie, known as Limerick Lane.

Also in Zhang’s horse property portfolio is the 210 acre Yulong Farm, which is set up for his ever increasing band of around 200 broodmares.

Yulong Park the 170-acre agistment property located at Bayles near Pakenham.

And Yulong is chasing further land opportunities near Nagambie.

As well as their recent stallion purchases, Yulong has been prominent at the recent Chairman’s Sale and digital online sale to purchase more broodmares.

Yulong’s chief operating officer Sam Fairgray said the new state of the art stallion facility at Yulong Stud is nearing completion and capable of accommodating up to 14 stallions.

“We have Grunt, Alabama Express and Tagaloa will most likely join our stallion roster either next year or the following year,” Fairgray said.

“We have now got up to 200 broodmares and it’s Mr Zhang’s vision to have a good stallion line-up which we will support with good quality mares.

“Alabama Express will get some really nice mares this year and we have got a couple of nice fillies retiring off the track which he will get.”

Fairgray said the Yulong vision was definitely to become a commercial operation to breed, rear and sell high class racehorses.

And having up to 10 resident stallions is also part of the Yulong vision, in addition to their expanding land capacity.

“We are just trying to do develop the farm with the right steps and stages,” Fairgray said.

Above: A view of the farm

“It will give Victorian breeders an opportunity to access high class stallions with the ability to keep their mares at home without needing to travel interstate.

“Mr Zhang really loves it and he is got a passion for it and he’ll be in it for a long time.

“He was quite adamant about setting up in Victoria and his two daughters are involved in the business who are based in Melbourne.”

At this stage there is no definite line of stallions being sought by Yulong. The focus is getting the stallions they believe will work with the Australian broodmare population.

Fairgray said the time frame for adding to Yulong’s stallion roster will look to be increasing their stallion numbers to five next year, eight the following year and then build it up to around the 10.

“That’s the aim, but it’s not just as easy as just saying that we are going to have that number because obviously you want to have a stallion that is going to be suitable,” he remarked.

“But Mr Zhang is very passionate about it and he knows what he wants to achieve.”

Fairgray said the plan was that all the yearlings from Yulong’s massive band of broodmares would all be offered for sale.

He said Yulong withdrew all of its yearlings from the Australian Easter Yearling Sale which turned into a digital sale because of the coronavirus.

“We are going to take them to round two and we had 14 entered for that first sale. We just withdrew them because people hadn’t had the opportunity to inspect the yearlings.” Fairgray said.

“But hopefully the way things are heading now, people will be able to inspect the yearlings and it will be a live auction up in Sydney.

“With yearlings especially, people need to be able to view them when they are paying large sums of money.

“But we will be definitely offering all the progeny for sale.

“We will still buy a few nice yearling fillies to try to help our broodmare band in years to come.”

The Yulong named horses are well known throughout the racecourses, with Zhang enjoying the racing side of the industry with a large racing team.

Yulong also export horses to China, but Fairgray said that market had obviously slowed down because of the restriction of flights to China, but is confident the market will pick up when air travel restrictions are lifted.

He said the Chinese market was starting to improve and grow.

“Despite the setback, I am confident the Chinese are getting interested in racing and understanding the whole dealing and sale process and racing,” Fairgray said.

“Going forward it is going to be important to us to be able to sell some of the yearlings in China.”

Yulong employs more than 50 people and that number will continue to rise in line with the company’s ever increasing horse population.

Fairgray said he would love to give some of the younger people in Victoria the opportunity to join Yulong so they could learn about the industry and then move on and better themselves at other farms.

It’s not just farms and horses that Yulong have been acquiring. They recently announced the appointment of highly respected stud manager Marcus Corban to a special projects role after spending more than 30 years as general manager of New Zealand’s Cambridge Stud.

While Yulong also have horses in the UK and America, the vision is clearly for success in the Australian and breeding industry before increasing their expansion into other countries.

Above: Immortal Love ridden by Craig Newitt wins the Tom Melbourne Trophy at Flemington Racecourse (Natasha Morello/Racing Photos)

After a 3.5 length victory at Flemington on Saturday, Immortal Love will be set aside for bigger things in the spring for Peter Creighton’s United Syndications.

The two-year-old Snitzel gelding, out of stakes winner Loveyamadly (Bel Esprit/Beauty World), was an impressive winner on debut at Echuca and backed it up at headquarters with an eye-catching victory.

Trained at Caulfield by Mick Price and Mick Kent jnr, Immortal Love is certainly living up to his name after he almost passed away as a foal.

Creighton, who likes to breed from horses he has bought and raced, said they wouldn’t have had a horse to race if it wasn’t for the skills of Scone Veterinary Hospital, Royston Murphy and his team at Scone’s Sledmere Stud.

“He is lucky to be alive after having a kidney infection and then had surgery to remove a blockage in his intestine.” Creighton said.

“He was a very tough foal to get through it, even Royston remarked that the foal is a tough little nut.”

The colt had been earmarked for the sale ring but it was his toughness that had Creighton thinking that perhaps he should be kept and syndicated.

They changed their mind after deciding that the colt had all the right attributes to make it on the track.

As a colt by Snitzel, out of a stakes winner mare, the price he could have fetched in the sale ring is something Creighton is reluctant to speculate on.

“We thought with all his strong attribute he showed in his first few months, we are going to take the punt and race him. That is the reason behind racing him as normally we sell the colts and keep the fillies to keep the family going,”’ Creighton said.

“We took the gamble as we knew he is a fighter and a tough horse and therefore decided to race him.

“Being by Snitzel out of a stakes winning mare, it was a big decision to make.”

Creighton said they believed Immortal Love deserved a chance in the spring and would probably head to the Caulfield Guineas after two wins on soft tracks. He will have to show that he is as good on the dry as he is in the wet ground.

One of the toughest decisions was the recommendation to the “Never Say Die” syndicate of 20 owners to geld the colt after he had other things on his mind during his training and trials.

“He was out the back star gazing but he is a different horse after being gelded with the blinkers.” Creighton said.

“They are a great bunch of people who race him and appreciate he would not be the horse he is now if we didn’t geld him.

“And with Mick Price and Mick Kent’s training efforts, he has come a long way.”

Creighton’s United Syndications also raced Immortal Love’s dam, Loveyamadly which under Price won six races, including the listed Abell Stakes (1200m) at Moonee Valley in 2013.

Loveyamadly never raced beyond 1200m, but Immortal Love won on debut over 1100m, and then at Flemington last Saturday scored over 1400m.

Still with ownership of the mare, Creighton said they would benefit if Immortal Love performs during the spring which would be a big reward for the syndicate members who also raced Loveyamadly.

He said a lot of the owners had been with him since the start and enjoyed success with such syndicated horses such as dual Group winning mare La Bella Dame, stakes winner Le Bonsir, Group winner Damesfly and Onpicalo.

“They have had a lot of luck, but we saw the ups and downs in two days,” Creighton said.

Creighton bought Loveyamadly from Yallambee Stud at Romsey for $60,000 at the 2010 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale.

As well as her six wins, she still holds the 1100m track record at Flemington which she set in March 2013 with Dale Smith in the saddle.

“She was a good horse that had a lot of speed but was feeling her joints at the end, so we retired her after 14 runs for six wins. It was a good career and we have now bred from her. ” Leighton said.

Although she was a valuable mare when she retired, Leighton said the good quality horses are so hard to get and there was never a thought of putting her through the sales ring.

“I have loved the breeding side of it since day one and I have probably had my best success from breeding.” he said.

“We are just riding with it at the moment. Fighting Harada is another of our good horses which I bred. He has had no luck so far and is back in training with Matty Williams at Mick’s Warrnambool base.

“Royal Snitzel is another one that we have bred, and she was Group 3 placed on three occasions and was by Snitzel out of Royal Charades who was a good mare that I bought in the early 2000s.

“I have had a little bit of luck.”

Loveyamadly is in foal to Rubick and will be going to So You Think this season.

Another of Creighton’s mares Exflytations who has a date with Toronado this season, while Liberty Made (Statue of Liberty/Ready Made Family) is already in foal to Toronado.

“We have got a bit to look forward to hopefully.” Creighton said.

Creighton said he always buys fillies with pedigrees and tells himself that if they are any good then they can be bred from commercially.

He started as a syndicator in 1993 when he gained his dealer’s licence and has exclusively used Mick Price as his trainer since 2000.

“I go to the sales with Mick and he buys them whilst I do the pedigrees. He does the physical inspections and we go from there and try to work out what we can afford,” he said.

Creighton admits that breeding can get you a good “cheap” horse.

“We could never afford to buy some of these horses which we are fortunate enough to have bred because they have been cracking types.” he said.

“You couldn’t possibly buy Immortal Love – Snitzel out of a stakes winning mare as it’s just out of our range.”

Immortal Love’s three-year-old full sister is also trained by Price and raced by another group of United Syndications owners is another city winner.

“Loveyamadly has had three winners to race now for three winners and Classic Gaming was the first horse by Medaglia D’Oro. We sold him for $200,000 at the Easter sales.” Creighton said.

“We’ve kept the next two after that.”

A gender test has shown that Loveyamadly is having a colt by Rubick and that will definitely head to the sales.

But at the moment Creighton is hoping Immortal Love can develop into the real deal.

“But who knows,” he said.

“You have to dream – it doesn’t cost you anything to dream.”

Above: Yulong’s foundation stallion Grunt (NZ)

Highly respected Stud Manager Marcus Corban has been appointed to a Special Projects role with burgeoning Victorian-based stud and racing operation Yulong. Formerly the General Manager of Cambridge Stud for over three decades, Corban will be taking up the position next month and will split his time between Australia and New Zealand.

“It’s incredibly exciting to be joining such a dynamic organisation who are growing rapidly in a strong Australian market,” said Corban. “Yulong have invested significantly in both infrastructure and bloodstock to become a major player in the Victorian industry. They’ve also developed a great team of people, with Sam [Fairgray] and Luke [Wilkinson] leading the way.

Corban said his role would be focused on Yulong’s continued growth and development, working closely with owner Mr Zhang and Sam Fairgray.

“Yulong have grown rapidly with significant investment, the focus is now on ensuring the strategy is in place to take the business and brand to the next level. It’s an exciting challenge that I look forward to working with the team on.”

“It’s an exciting challenge that I look forward to working with the team on.” – Marcus Corban

Corban is no stranger to farm development projects, having worked closely with Sir Patrick Hogan on the growth of Cambridge Stud to become New Zealand’s most famous and successful thoroughbred stud. He also was involved in the more recent farm developments after the change in Cambridge Stud’s ownership.

A chance to work closely with Yulong, a strong emerging business in the Victorian breeding and racing industry, was an opportunity Corban was delighted to get involved with.

“There’s such a buzz around the Australian industry and the investment in Victoria by companies like Yulong has seen it emerge as a strong breeding frontier in recent years,” said Corban. “Although all businesses are having their challenges at the moment, the fundamentals underpinning the industry are very strong and it really is the place to be.”

Corban will begin his role with Yulong next month.

Article courtesy of TDN

Above: Wendy Smith at Blue Gum Farm

Much to Wendy Smith’s surprise, not only has she been nominated she is one of two finalist for the Horsemanship award in the Australian Stable and Stud Staff Awards. As yearling manager at Blue Gum Farm, Wendy has just been ‘doing the job’ but her incredible dedication and talent has been recognised by not only her colleagues at Blue Gum Farm but also by the Thoroughbred Industry.

‘I didn’t start out in the Thoroughbred Industry, I started in the trotting industry’ stated Wendy. ‘The quality and care taken of the horses is what attracted me to the Thoroughbred Industry.I managed a small farm in Western Australia and transferred to the Thoroughbred Industry.’ After four years in Western Australia, Wendy moved back to Victoria where she took up a role at Swettenham Stud, formally Collingrove Stud as a Vet Nurse. She remained with Swettenham Stud for nine years and after just four years at the farm was promoted to Assistant Manager.

Wendy had the passion for horses from an early age, growing up on a cattle farm there was no sight of horses. It wasn’t long before her Dad who was excellent at animal husbandry soon added horses to his repertoire with taking Wendy eventing. His visits on the farm looking at cattle soon included spotting horses for Wendy.

‘From a very early age I was horse mad! I remember when I was about five years old, there is a photo of me sat on a branch of a tree with the saddle that dad bought me. We lived on a farm but couldn’t afford to have horses. Dad was a stock and station agent and mum was a house wife.’

Wendy’s parents were hugely supportive of her passion with enrolling her into pony club, eventing and transforming the farm to accommodate her equine pursuits.

All of Wendy’s experience has been learning on the job and this has been testament to her expertise in the industry. ‘I applied to go to Glenalmonston Colleage after I left school. I got a job in the interim at a Trotting farm and deferred my college placement for twelve months. I felt I was just learning so much more with hands on experience so decided not to go to college.’

Wendy’s passion is the care of the horses and is still using her experience she gained as Vet Nurse with handling the post-natal care of foals during the foaling season in addition to her role as yearling manager.

‘I have a great deal of patience and have always specialised in young horses, even with the trotters I use to do the breaking. I found I have an affinity with young horses and being involved with the education process is what I love to do.’

‘The people in the industry are great. Blue Gum Farm is very family orientated and the care of the horses always comes first. There won’t be a branch in a single paddock at Blue Gum to alleviate any risk of injury.’

Above: Wendy Smith with Colleagues at Blue Gum Farm

Wendy Smith has not only made as a finalist of the Australian Stud and Stable Staff awards but she is also the only Victorian nominee which is a fantastic achievement. ‘It really does mean a huge amount. I was blown away when Patti Campbell told me I was being nominated. I am just in the barn working away so to think that they thought enough of me to nominate me I was over the moon. The awards showcase people who in other instances wouldn’t be showcased so it is great. I couldn’t believe that I had made the top five let along the top two!’

‘There has been some horses that touch your heart along the way who I follow through their racing career. Sartorial Splendour is a favourite one of mine who is actually back spelling at the moment. You learn with age that you can’t get too attached to any of them. Working in the yearling barn we sell 90% of the horses, you love them all but then need to hope they go to a nice place that look after them well.’

‘I love the Victorian breeding side of things and the stud farms. Everyone in Victoria is so friendly. I was born and bred in Victoria and I wouldn’t consider working anywhere else.’

The advice that Wendy would pass on to someone wanting to start in the industry is ‘You have to follow your dream and you need to come in for the love of horses. If you are coming in because it is just a job, then it is probably not the job for you as you need to have the passion. If you work hard and are diligent then you get rewarded and the horses reward you every day. You need to be here for the love and the horses and their welfare comes first.

It is with great anticipation that Encosta De Lago’s exciting son Needs Further, the sire of Classic-winning and inaugural All-Star Mile winner Mystic Journey, will stand the forthcoming breeding season at Aquis Seymour in association with Tasmania’s Armidale Stud.

“We are very fortunate at Aquis to have the opportunity to work with the time honoured Armidale Stud and partners in standing Needs Further at our Victorian farm, he is exactly the stallion we needed on our roster,” stated Aquis CEO Tony (Tubba) Williams.

“Needs Further has quickly become the leading sire in Tasmania and from his second crop, sired the exciting filly Mystic Journey who took all before her in winning the Gr.1 VRC Australian Guineas and inaugural $5m All-Star Mile. With Needs Further being a son of Encosta De Lago, it feels like we are bringing Encosta De Lago’s legacy back home to Victoria.”

From the immediate family of multiple Australian and New Zealand Champion Sire Zabeel and his half-brother Baryshnikov, both winners of the Gr.1 VRC Australian Guineas, Needs Further is a half-brother to Gr.1 ATC Golden Rose Stakes and Gr.1 ATC Randwick Guineas winner Hallowed Crown, sire of this season’s dominant Gr.1 ATC Australian Oaks winner Colette.

The son of multiple Champion sire Encosta De Lago, whose sire line has produced Northern Meteor, Rubick and Zoustar, Needs Further is out of the Gr.1 Golden Slipper runner-up Crowned Glory, a daughter of breed shaper Danehill, and he was victorious in the ATC Gr.3 Carbine Club Stakes, from just five career starts.

Needs Further’s statistics rival many leading sires and is highlighted by $3.7m stakes earner Mystic Journey who by winning the Gr.1 VRC Australian Guineas aligns herself with the best fillies of their respective generations in Miss Finland, Mosheen and Shamrocker.

Needs Further’s progeny includes the exciting sprinter Bold Star, winner of the Listed VRC Kensington Stakes, Gr.3 TTC Vamos Stakes winner Deroche, also a winner of the Tasmanian Magic Millions 2YO and 3YO Classics, as well as multiple Stakes winning fillies Pateena Arena and Mystical Pursuits.

“We have had increasing interest from several mainland stud farms to stand Needs Further over the last two seasons,” commented Armidale Stud Manager David Whishaw.

“He’s arguably had the best start to a stud career that any Tasmanian based stallion has had in the modern era and he really has earnt the right to access the bigger and better quality books of mares which Aquis and the Victorian market will no doubt offer”.

With his progeny dominating the 2019 Tasmanian Horse of the Year awards winning every award with a clean sweep, Needs Further was also crowned Sire of the Year and Leading Juvenile Sire, being the sire of every feature 2YO winner for the season in Tasmania.

With three individual juvenile Stakes winners to his credit, as well as two winners of the Tasmania Magic Millions 2YO Classic and siring the 2YO of the Year in Tasmania in every season he has stood at stud, it is clearly evident that Needs Further will be a perfect stallion for the lucrative Super VOBIS scheme.

Like Northern Meteor (Encosta De Lago), Needs Further was foaled, raised and raced by Gooree Park, one of the most famous nurseries in Australasia and producer of leading sires and Champion racehorses.

“Versatility is everything in a successful sire and Needs Further possesses this undeniable quality; feature 2YO winners, sprinter-milers and Classic 3YOs at the highest level, a trend that will continue with support from Victorian breeders who appreciate his value,” summed up Williams.

Needs Further will stand at Aquis Seymour, VIC at a fee of $13,750 (inc. GST)

For more information, contact Aquis CEO, Tony “Tubba” Williams on 0428 932 663 or Aquis Operations Manager – Victoria, Murray Tillett on 0419 985 921.

Kevin O’Brien with Andrew Mallyon after General Truce won at Flemington (Racing Photos)

Regarded by all in the industry as a true gentleman, the breeding and racing industries lost a true friend of our ranks on Saturday the 16th of May 2020.

Kevin O’Brien passed away peacefully after living a life full of family, success and memories.

Kevin along with wife Tanith, founded Lauriston Thoroughbred Farm at Corinella in Victoria’s south-east. Prior to establishing Lauriston Thoroughbred Farm, Kevin had a successful career in the caravan industry.

Kevin started a company called Camec in 1963 after recognising the need for a specialised caravan repair centre to accommodate the growing caravan and tourism industries.

The company was successful and saw a boom in the 1990’s which led to Camec acquiring their competitor Caraparts and expanding their locations across Australia. Camec became the country’s leading supplier of caravan equipment and accessories.

Kevin served as president of the Caravan Trade and Industries Association of Victoria (CIAV) from 1990 to 1995 and was a founding director of the industry national body, the Caravan Industry of Australia, serving as Chairman from 1992 to 1997. He was awarded the Eric Hayman Award for Excellence in 1995; the industry’s highest individual honour. He was made a life member of the CIAV in 2000 and inducted into its Hall of Fame in 2013.

An introduction to the racing industry by way of race horse ownership had Kevin hooked. A horse he leased with a group of mates from footy, Fighting Legend (Street Fighter x Rosy Legend), was the introduction over 40 years ago which paved the way for his successful career in breeding and racing.

While according to Kevin, Fighting Legend ‘didn’t live up to his name’. He purchased a tried horse named Poncho who was trained by Angus Armanasco. Poncho had a full career and won 17 starts as a racehorse.

Proud of his Irish ancestors, visits to Ireland inspired Kevin to pay tribute to his forebearers by creating the orange and emerald green quarter silks which have been seen regularly on race tracks across Australia.

There has been no shortage of horses either bred or raced by Lauriston Thoroughbred Farm to have carried these colours.

One horse in particular held a special place in Kevin’s heart. Gold Edition, a mare Kevin purchased in 2005 at a Gold Coast Magic Millions yearling sale, won the VRC Ascot Vale Stakes in 2006 (now the G1 VRC Coolmore Stakes), the G1 MVRC Manikato Stakes in 2007 and a host of Group 2 wins in addition to the 2007 Gold Coast Magic Millions 3YO.

Kevin O’Brien with wife Tanith after Gold Edition won at Moonee Valley (Lauriston)

Horses and success are synonymous with Lauriston Thoroughbred Farm. Each year their main draft of horses would be at the Melbourne Premier sale at Oaklands Junction.

Global Glamour who was bred at Lauriston, achieved dual Group 1 winning status before she was sold as a broodmare to Coolmore and Gerry Harvey. Other horses bred or mated by Lauriston Thoroughbred Farm to have graced our tracks include General Truce, Legend of Condor, Platinum Angel, Pippie, Eptimum, Tudor, Silentz, Kardashing, Undoubtable Miss and Jentico.

Kevin served as a Committee member on the Melbourne Racing Club Committee from 2007 -2010.

MRC Chairman, Peter Le Grand who served alongside Kevin on the Committee remarked;

“He was just a champion fellow and one of those truly great people of the turf, unassuming, loved his racing and horse breeding.”

“You speak to anyone in racing and you’ll never hear a detrimental word about Kevin O’Brien,” Le Grand said.

Kevin was one who many defined as a mentor. Everyone you speak to has fond memories of Kevin, such as the hospitable and generous manner in which he would always make time when you visited the farm. Everyone remarked about what a true gentleman he was and how welcome he would make you feel.  Whether at the farm, Oaklands or the race track, Kevin would find time to tell you a story and had a witty sense of humour.

He gave people opportunities in the industry such as young trainers, apprentice jockeys and staff. Those who worked alongside him noted that he was a pleasure to work along.

He loved sharing the success he had on the track with friends and those in the industry.

The outpouring of grief on social media has been immense. It signifies the impact which Kevin had on those in the industry.

Kevin is survived by his beloved wife Tanith, his children James, Gabby and Georgina and their families.

The Funeral Service for Kevin O’Brien will be held for close family and friends on Friday 22 May 2020 at 11:15am.

The service will be webcast live and can be accessed by clicking here.

Tributes have been greatly appreciated by the family and can be left on Kevin’s tribute page, by clicking here.

Chloe Jones of Flinders Park Stud

The infectious passion and love for horses couldn’t be more apparent for Chloe Jones, second in charge to Assistant Manager Michael Cumming and Brian Coyle at Flinders Park Stud, in Flinders on the Mornington Peninsula.

‘I knew that horses were always going to be a part of me, whether I liked it or not!

I just had to figure out how to make a career out of them rather than the horses just being an expensive hobby!’

When considering a career Chloe knew that working with animals and horses in the outdoors was the only thing that would make her truly happy. Although she grew up around horses, her family and the world she came from was not involved with the Thoroughbred Industry.

‘My mum raised me on the back of a quarter horse, I was riding before I could walk. Growing up on the farm, spending all my spare time mucking stables and cleaning paddocks, the horses were my family. I was totally at peace around the them and utterly obsessed with all things horses.’

Through-out school Chloe wanted to gain a deeper understanding for animals and horses, so she began her educational journey which saw her complete a series of different qualifications. Studying at the National Centre of Equine Education to gain all of her Animal Studies and Equine Certifications. Although Chloe was unsure which direction her career would take, the education really accentuated her love for the horse. ‘I had so much passion and I wanted to learn more!’ Completing another course through the Northern Metropolitan Institute of TAFE, she graduated a diploma in Equine Stud Management, which saw her accepted into a scholarship program. This led her to traveling and working on major farms and stables around Australia and New Zealand. Arriving home to Victoria she continued gaining more experience and completed a course at the Australian College of Animal Therapies. This enabled Chloe to dive deeper into her passion for anatomy and physiology, majoring in Equine Sports Therapy and opening doors for vet nursing, equine rehab, massage, the possibilities really were limitless.

For Chloe, to work in the Thoroughbred Industry took some emotional acceptance. ‘I am a full-blown animal loving vegan! No-one in my family have ever trained or been involved with racehorses or even supported gambling. For me, I decided I would make up my own mind about the industry and here I am today, one of the true horse lovers working in the  Australian Thoroughbred Industry’

Chloe’s successful education saw her gain first-hand experience on multiple different farms from foaling down, yearling preparation and sales, bloodstock work, horse riding schools, pre-training and breaking in young horses, all the way through to tractor driving, agriculture certifications and track work.

‘I decided I wanted to learn everything, from breeding the animals all the way to watching them on the win at the races. I wanted to know everything about how the industry operated and whether I could make a change for the better of the horse.’

After 2 years of working her way around different farms and stables, Chloe decided that Victoria was where she needed to be based close to family and friends. Chloe knew that she wanted to be working out on a farm in the sun and fresh air raising horses and prepping well rounded quality yearlings, this was where she found her drive.

‘I love being connected to the horse from start to end, setting up their breeding, to watching the foals grow up, then beginning their education and pre-training, daily care and plenty of love, all the way through to taking your horse through the ring at the sales and feeling that buzz, as the hammer comes down and your filled with pride’

Chloe is coming up to her eighth year at Flinders Park Stud.  ‘I saw the position for a yearling prep role and applied. The farm was nearby to where I was living and working at the time, I was managing an agistment farm for a Polo Player. I took the Flinders Park yearling job and after all these years here we are today!’

Flinders Park Stud offered Chloe her assistant manager role. It is evident that this farm works closely as a team, with a shared desired outcome for the horses. ‘It was important to me to find a farm with like-minded people that I could work for. The health, happiness and future of the horses is paramount. The farm is my home, we are all a family here.’

‘The experiences and opportunities that Flinders Park has given me, has pushed me in the right direction for my career to develop further, for that I will always be thankful.’

Chloe’s dream since she was a little girl was to purchase and her own farm. The plan was to buy somewhere on the Mornington Peninsula so that she could build up her business which would include; riding, teaching, training, and caring for all types of performance horses.

Working on a horse farm is full time job and requires 24/7 attention. Chloe somehow manages to do it all, and somehow still finds time to dabble in some yoga teaching and training. ‘You have to keep physically fit for the horses!’

In addition to working at Flinders Park, Chloe now also runs her boutique agistment and training Centre in Tyabb.  Almost 2 years ago Chloe took the leap of faith and decided it was time to make her dreams a reality. Chloe and her husband purchased their beautiful property and the hard work began. Her farm was full in the first week that it opened, with anywhere from thirteen to seventeen horses in full boutique care and training. With the hands-on experience, education and support Chloe has received from the Thoroughbred Industry she is lucky enough to be successfully running and enjoying her business, Graydens Park.

It is remarkable to see the care and true unconditional love that Chloe has, she really is the epitome of working 24/7 with horses. ‘Being on the farm with the horses is my therapy. It is the ultimate dream for me and I am very lucky to be living my dream every single day. The experience and guidance I’ve had at Flinders Park has given me the confidence to successfully purchase and run my own property, which is huge. I never imagined all those years ago stepping into the industry that it would open as many doors as it has for me.’ Chloe has achieved an extraordinary amount and considering she has only just turned 30, it is an amazing feat.

‘I know this life is where I belong, and I wouldn’t t want to have it any other way. Horses saved my life, so now that’s why I’m spending the rest of time looking after them.’

Chloe relishes with the unique lifestyle on the Mornington Peninsula. ‘I enjoy the boutique feel which a lot of farms on the Peninsula have. I believe in quality over quantity and I enjoy the relationship that I can develop with the horses on smaller farms. It allows you to spend more time with each horse keeping an eye for detail and taking pride in her work is very important to Chloe. ‘We are breeding and raising horses in one of the most beautiful places in Australia, so I feel very blessed. There are 4 or 5 studs in close proximity to one another down here which makes me feel like we live in our own little thoroughbred bubble. I am a big ocean lover so finding a farm to work for that is less than a 5-minute drive from the Flinders beach, which has panoramic views of the water makes me feel very at home. Summer lunch breaks always involve taking the dogs for a jump off the pier and cooling down after working the horses.’ Chloe and her husband even got married at Flinders Park Stud, in the main paddock overlooking the ocean. With their family and friends by their side, a couple of tipis and some impressive fairy lights, Chloe rode her off the track thoroughbred mare down the aisle with her two dogs at foot. The rest is history.

The advice that Chloe would wish to pass onto someone looking at starting in the industry is ‘You have to follow your heart, work hard, ask lots of questions, and never ever give up!  I won’t lie, it is difficult at times, this is not a 9am till 5pm, Monday to Friday job, there’s no heating out in the paddocks in winter, and certainly no aircon in summer. It’s hard work, but that’s why it’s so rewarding. When you step into this industry you will reap the benefits, there is so much to offer for anybody willing to try. This industry provides people with a lifestyle and it is so much more powerful than a pay cheque from a 9-5 job. Being part of a community of animal lovers, surrounded by true horseman, and getting to work with the ultimate equine athletes. Everyone knows one another and supports each other immensely, there’s never any shortage of work, and the opportunities are limitless. You can all achieve big dreams just like I have. All thanks to the pure love of the horse.’

Rachel’s daughter with Booker

For John and Rachel Doherty, it was hard to believe the results they achieved for Booker when she went through ring at the Chairman’s sale in Sydney. She has been part of their lives since they moved to Yarran in 2017. ‘Booker came into our life as a racehorse when we moved to Yarran. She would come to the farm to spell and she was a lovely natured horse with a great temperament. She was just a lovely horse and thank goodness she was a good racehorse as well.’

In 2018 it was Heatherley that put Yarran on the map as a notable farm in the breeding industry when the broodmare sold for $1.6 million. ‘We had Heatherley a couple of years ago and she sold for the same price as Booker at the Magic Millions on the Gold Coast. Until then Yarran was working away with not many people outside of Victoria knowing who we were. As soon as you sell a big horse, people are asking the questions about us. It is huge for the farm.’

The following year after Heatherley was sold at the Gold Coast, Yarran took three broodmares to the Gold Coast who all sold well with their top lot selling for $300,000. Everyone at the sale was asking about Heatherly and people now knew about Yarran from Victoria.

‘It was harder this year with COVID 19 restrictions as we couldn’t go to Sydney. We are hugely thankful to Fairview Park who looked after Booker for inspections and the sale. They really helped out a lot. For Yarran and getting our name out there, it really is very special.’

The impact that a good sale result can have for a farm can be significant and that is no truer for Yarran. ‘As a result, we have had made new contacts and have more broodmares coming to the farm during the breeding season, including some from New Zealand. We have a Group 1 winning mare coming to the farm this season, in foal to Justify.

Booker achieved the highest price for all the Victorian lots sold at the sale with Rachel and John Doherty celebrating the result from the comfort of the farm in Victoria. ‘It is bittersweet as we weren’t there with her. Her owners, Barrie and Midge Griffiths, came over to Yarran and we watched it with them and had a little celebration. They were delighted that she has gone to such a good home. John and I have been in the industry for a long time so to be dealing with horses like this is pretty special.’

Above: Robyn’s Folly as a foal with Robyn Shakespeare

Robyn Shakespeare is hoping it’s only a matter of time before her homebred three year-old filly will secure its first victory.

Robyn’s Folly, yes it’s named after Robyn, was sired by Hurdy Gurdy Man who she bred raced with her late husband, Ed.

The filly is only one of three horses sired by Hurdy Gurdy Man (Street Cry/Abalone) before the stallion died of a colic attack on New Year’s Day in 2017.

Robyn’s Folly and Gunsablazin’ have made it to the racetrack, while Hurdy Gurdy Man’s third foal from his only crop when he started stud duties in 2015 died after birth.

While Gunsablazin’ has battled in his five runs, Robyn’s Folly has had one third and two fourths from her three starts with Warrnambool trainer Daniel Bowman. The filly resumed last week from a spell with another promising fourth.

Robyn’s Folly is out of Shiny and New (Foreplay/Shag’s Sister) which was raced by Robyn and Ed Shakespeare to six wins, three seconds and three thirds.

Hurdy Gurdy Man, a Victorian horse of the year, was more than a handy galloper, winning the Group 3 Hobart Cup (2200m) in 2013.

Asked whether a win for her filly was just around the corner, Robyn said: “I hope so, I need a new hat.

“The track might have been a bit too soft for her last week.”

Robyn and her husband, who died six years ago, also bred Hurdy Gurdy Man’s dam, Shiny and New which has a filly foal by Riverbank Farm stallion, Redente.

“I have still got Shiny and New but I really don’t know what to do with her now,” Robyn said.

‘’Daniel (Bowman) wants me to face the other filly but I’ll just wait and see what happens at the time.”

Robyn explained that after Hurdy Gurdy Man retired she sold him for $20,000 as a stallion prospect and included in the sale was a free service which produced the nicely named Robyn’s Folly.

She believes that with horses it comes down to two things – good luck and bad luck.

Robyn admits to having a bit of both with Hurdy Gurdy Man who has nearly reached $500,000 in prize money.

And she is hoping for that slice of good luck with Robyn’s Folly.

Above: Humma Humma winning the Carlton Draught Alinghi Stakes Picture: Racing and Sports

John McArdle believes when you’re on a good thing it’s a case of sticking with it.

He has been richly rewarded with that theory by his Victorian-bred mare Humma Humma which chalked up another black type victory in the Group 3 Proud Miss Stakes (1200m) at Morphettville on Saturday.

For McArdle it’s a bit like famous American, the late Victor Kiam who said he liked the Remington electric razor so much that he bought the company.

In McArdle’s case he has bought every foal out of Humma Mumma (Bel Esprit) since racing her second foal Strela (Smart Missile).

Humma Humma was his next purchase out of the mare followed by Hummalong (Hallowed Crown) and his latest buy was another filly from the mare by Capitalist.

Along the way Humma Mumma missed to Brazen Beau (in 2016) but her most recent addition is a filly by Zoustar, but she again missed to Brazen Beau last season.

And if McArdle and his Redgum Racing have their way, the Zoustar filly will continue the family tradition of joining his stable – but it will more than likely come at an increased rate of dollars.

The Mornington trainer paid $120,000 for Stela, the only colt thrown by Humma Mumma, when he was offered by Flinders Park Stud.

He then got Humma Humma for what is now a bargain price of $80,000 at the 2017 Melbourne Premier Yearling Sale from Flinders Park Stud’s draft. The mare now has $581,340 in prize money.

Hummalong was next at $100,000.

McArdle’s Redgum Racing then departed with $240,000 at this year’s Melbourne Premier for a Capitalist filly out of the mare.

And who knows what price the Zoustar filly will fetch when she goes through the ring, but McArdle has made it clear he wants her.

McArdle said he was extremely happy to win last Saturday’s Group 3 which will only enhance the mare’s value when she heads to the breeding barn after another year of racing.

“She is a valuable mare,” McArdle said.

And he doesn’t hide his admiration for Humma Mumma as a producer of quality foals.

“I have bought everything out of the mare. There has only been four to go to the sales.

“The first was Strela who broke a track record at Bendigo at his first start as a two year-old. He had six starts (for two wins and two seconds) and then got injured.

“Then Humma Humma was the second one and we have a three year-old filly called Hummalong that has had three starts and placed in them all.

“And then I bought the Capitalist for $240,000 this year.”

As for the Zoustar filly, McArdle said he trains a few horses for Brian Coyle of Flinders Park Stud which has bred the Humma Mumma horses.

“I’ll certainly be out there having a looking at it and we’ll go from there,” McArdle said.

He said he liked Stela as a horse, the same as Humma Humma and he described Hummalong and the Capitalist filly as Humma Humma’s twins.

“If you had all three lined up beside each other you’d be struggling to tell them apart,” McArdle remarked.

Asked whether he would still attempt to buy the Zoustar filly if he didn’t like her on type, McArdle said: “You never know, you’d always have a look. I don’t usually buy them if I don’t like them on type, so probably not.

“I haven’t seen it but a couple of my mates have and they tell me she is a very good type. We’ll see how we go.”

Humma Mumma was trained by another Mornington trainer, Lyn Tolson, to four wins after two unplaced starts with Mick Price.

Humma Humma was due to arrive back at McArdle’s property on Sunday afternoon to head straight to the spelling paddock.

“She is going to race on for another season and Widden Stud bought a share in her.” McArdle said.

“We will work out a plan for her in the spring and then we’ll go from there.

“We’ll keep racing her for that extra year so she will be a five year-old when she goes to stud.”

Widden Stud bought into the mare just before she won her first stakes race – the Redelva Stakes (1100m) at Morphettville in April, 2019.

Humma Humma was placed in five stakes races before winning the Redelva Stakes.

“She has been a lot of fun,” McArdle said.

Above: King of Hastings with Craig Williams on board (image Grant Courtney)

Chapel City’s boilover win in the Group 3 R.A. Lee Stakes at Morphettville on Saturday has given his Victorian sire – llovethiscity – another reminder of the stallion’s ability to produce a big race winner.

The six year-old gelding started at 100-1 to narrowly score for Victorian apprentice jockey Georgina Cartwright over the 1600m trip, defeating  Group 1 winner Seabrook and the highly fancied Harbour Views.

llovethiscity, a son of Magic Albert, is a Group 1 winner and racked up nearly $1 million in prize money when trained at Randwick by Grahame Begg. Three of his four wins were at Group level.

Now standing at Noor Elaine Farm at Euroa, the stud’s manager Mark Calwell said they couldn’t be happier with the stallion as they attempt to resurrect his career in the breeding barn.

“We are just happy with IIovethiscity overall,” Mark Calwell said.

“Since we took him on it’s just got better and better.

“He always seems to have had a stakes horse hanging around.”

After Chapel City’s triumph, the stallion’s promising three-year-old King of Hastings went down by a head at Flemington over 1000m after starting $3.20 favourite.

“King of Hastings was really good too,” Calwell said.

“I don’t know whether he is a major group horse, but he is certainly a good horse. Chapel City is a good horse that just keeps achieving results.”

King of Hastings trained by Anthony Freedman at Flemington has had nine starts for three wins and four seconds.

IIovethiscity previously stood at Euroa’s Larneuk Stud but has had two seasons at the neighbouring Noor Elaine Farm.

His fee when he joined Noor Elaine Farm in 2018 was $4400 and he served 70 mares which was the largest number of his stallion career which began in 2012 with 43 mares.

Last year he served 59 mares when his service fee was increased to $5500.

Calwell says it is an unbelievably competitive market for stallions at the lower end of the market.

“It makes it tough,” he said.

“But we have got some really nice horses by him on the farm that are weanlings and we will see how we go.”

Calwell hopes that llovethiscity will get a big boost if the Greg Eurell trained llovemyself performs during the spring carnival. The gelding was bred and raced by Neville Murdoch who stood llovethiscity at his Larneuk Stud Farm.

Ilovemyself won on debut at Flemington, claiming the listed Very Special Kids Plate (1000m) and was then unplaced as the favourite in the Group 3 Pago Pago at Rosehill before heading to the paddock.

Calwell said the spruik on the two year-old colt is pretty big.

“If the spruik on him lives up to it, I think IIovethiscity will be very popular this year.” Calwell said.

“I hope to match the 59 mares we got last year or go a little bit better. You have to be a realistic with everything that is going on at the moment.”

“And I don’t know whether people will just sit on their cash in that lower end of the market or whether some of them will think we should be breeding because two years down the track things might be better.”

Calwell said they had provided llovethiscity with the best possible mares and it was now up to the stallion to produce after having modest books of 28 and 27 in 2017 and 2016.

He said they had some nice colts by the stallion to go the sales next year.

“We have got a fair few of our mares in foal to him, so we are backing him as much as we can.” Calwell said.

“Horses like him probably don’t get top mares which you have to be a realist about it.”

Chapel City was bred by South Australian based Margot Noack who has been a big supporter of Victorian based stallions.

Margot owns the dam of Chapel City – Chapent – and believed the breeding of IIovethiscity was a good mix for her unraced mare that is now 16 years-old.

“I just thought it matched up so well,” she said.

“I went to look at the horse and he was just magnificent. He is very masculine which I liked and he was a good racehorse.

“I thought why is he so cheap which was ridiculous but I’m jolly glad he was because that’s all I could afford.”

Margot has another colt by IIovethiscity from Chapent and sent another two of her mares – A Sweetee and Wings of An Angel – to the stallion for two fillies.

“We have got three on the ground by him now and I sent Chapent to Puissance de Lune last year,” she said.

Margot believes that IIovethiscity is extremely underrated.

Above: Artie Schiller (USA) standing at Stockwell Thoroughbreds

STOCKWELL THOROUGBREDS has announced that service fees for its A-Team stallions – ARTIE SCHILLER (USA) and AL MAHER – will remain unchanged for the 2020 breeding season.

The two highly successful stallions will stand at $11,000 and $8800 respectively at the Diggers Rest base in Victoria.

“We are very fortunate to be standing two highly successful and proven stallions in a market that does not often offer such consistency of results year in and out,” said Stockwell’s Brodie Becker.

“ARTIE SCHILLER and AL MAHER have established results, both in the yearling market and on the racetrack, through a genuine and hard earned legacy.

“Neither was afforded the massive books of high grade commercial mares to launch their careers others have been gifted, but both have proven to be genuine upgraders and with records to be extremely proud of.”

ARTIE SCHILLER and AL MAHER have both developed envious stakes results of better than 5.0% to starters which places them in elite company.

ARTIE SCHILLER progeny have now amassed $74 million in earnings with 52 stakes winners of 96 races. His strike rate of winners is running at 72%.

AL MAHER has produced 35 stakes winners of 80 stakes races and career earnings of almost $50 million. He has established a 64% winner to runner record.

“We recognise the commercial trends in the industry and that some stallions are considered “hot” each season, but in a year of revision and reality – such as has been imposed heading into the coming season – we could not be more proud to offer two stallions who deliver each year and protect mare owners from exposure to expensive risks,” Becker said.

Above: Black Caviar winning the Lightning Stakes

Scandinavia, the grand old dame of Australian breeding, has died at the age of 25.

What an incredible mare! A Group Two winner who would go on to produce four stakes winners, including Group One winner and leading sire, Magnus.

What’s more, Scandinavia is the granddam of racing immortal Black Caviar.

With her final foal – the 3YO, Viking Warrior – now racing in Hong Kong, Scandinavia lived out her final years at Victoria’s Dorrington Farm, owned by her breeder, Rob Crabtree.

Over the past 30 years, Crabtree has bred and/or raced quite a few stakes winners, including a Group One double in the space of 40 minutes via Catchy (Blue Diamond) and Sheidel (Oakleigh Plate), but Scandinavia’s impact will likely remain unmatched.

“You never forget your first … I had a couple of good horses before Scandinavia and a few since, but in my opinion she’s changed the landscape of Australian breeding: a ‘blue hen’ by any definition,” Crabtree opines.

“She’s a Group winner in her own right, she produced Group winners, her daughters have produced Group winners and her granddaughters are now producing Group winners.”

The story goes back to 1994 when Crabtree purchased the unraced Vain mare, Song Of Norway, from Kingston Town’s breeder, David Hains, for $40,000: in foal to Snippets and the pregnancy which would become Scandinavia.

“She (Song of Norway) had just the three foals for me, but I put her in foal to Western Symphony after Scandinavia was born and she produced the Sydney stakes winner, Midnight Sun,” Crabtree recalls.

“I decided to race Scandinavia in partnership with John Sadler and he trained her to win a Blue Diamond Prelude at two and the Group Two QTC Cup, but she was also 4-times Group One placed in the Salinger, Goodwood, Lightning and Newmarket.

“Scandinavia was an even better racehorse than the record suggests – she was beaten a whisker in the Salinger behind 12-time stakes winner, Flavour, and was less than a head away when third to an absolute flying machine, General Nediym, in the Newmarket.”

Scandinavia’s first foal – Danavia, by Danehill – would fail to salute in four starts, but she went on to produce Melbourne stakes winner, Iconic, for Crabtree and trainer Tony McEvoy.

The second foal, Helsinge – albeit unraced – would leave an indelible mark on Australian racing.

Bred by Lee Fleming through a foal share arrangement, Helsinge would be sold by Fleming at the 2005 Inglis Broodmare Sale: going on to produce both the superstar, Black Caviar, and 4-time Group One winner All Too Hard for Rick Jamieson’s Gilgai Farm.

(All Too Hard now stands at Vinery Stud where he has produced 16 stakes winners, including 3YO sensation, Alligator Blood).

Another of Helsinge’s daughters, Naturale, is the dam of this season’s stakes winning 2YO and Group One placed, Ole Kirk for Team Hawkes.

However, it was Scandinavia’s third foal that would change the course of Crabtree’s history.

“I’d come so close to winning a Group One on too many occasions and Magnus had finished second to Miss Andretti – in track record time – in the Lightning Stakes, then he ran third in the Oakleigh Plate,” Crabtree reveals. “Winning a Group One was proving to be fairly elusive, but then Magnus came out and won the Galaxy in Sydney for the ‘comeback kid’ Peter Moody and Damien Oliver.

“I stood Magnus at Eliza Park (now Sun Stud), which ironically, is the farm I owned in the 90s, and from there he’s gone on to produce four Group One winners, including this year’s Futurity winner, Streets of Avalon, and 40 other stakes horses of $46 million.”

Fleming would also breed – from Scandinavia – the multiple Group winner Wilander and Baltics (granddam of Group winning 2YO and this year’s Blue Diamond runnerup, Hanseatic), before the mare would remain with Crabtree for the remainder of her career.

“Scandinavia then produced Arctic Flight, a full sister to Magnus, and she won a stakes race, along with three black type placings, while her last stakes winner was Scandiva, who won the (Group Two) Magic Night and finished second to Guelph in the Group One ATC Sires’ Produce. Anthony Cummings trained both of them for me,” Crabtree points out.

“Her final stakes horse was the Lindsay Park trained, Lionhearted, who finished second in the (Group Two) Skyline at his second start.”

Scandinavia would be retired from stud duties in 2018.

“What a phenomenal career and truly a legend in her own lifetime,” Crabtree adds. “For my wife, Sylvie, and I, Scandinavia is like one of the family, just as she’s been for carer, Fiona Melling, who’s looked after her from the start.

“Fittingly, Scandinavia is buried in the way of champions : standing up and facing the morning sun.”

Article courtesy of Aushorse

The below are the 2020 Victorian stallion fees, which have been announced up until the 11 August 2020.

Omaha Beach will join Spendthrift Australia this season (Spendthrift)

Two exciting newcomers will complete the five stallion 2020 Spendthrift Australia roster, with the announcement of three-time G1-winning son of legendary War Front, Omaha Beach (USA), and dual G1-winning son of Curlin, Vino Rosso (USA) winner of the 2019 Breeders’ Cup Classic.

Both stallions demonstrated brilliance on the racetrack, are by Champion Sires and possess deep female pedigrees. They retired as the two hottest stud prospects in North America this season.

The speed and versitilty displayed by Omaha Beach saw him lay claim to three G1 titles as a 3-year-old over varying distances. In doing so, he became the first horse in 30 years to win a G1 over 1200m and 1800m in the same year.

When asked if Omaha Beach is as good as any he’s trained in his illustrious Hall of Fame career, Trainer Richard Mandella responded with emotion; “I can’t think of one better.”

Omaha Beach has a unqiuely international pedigree littered with 11 Group 1 wins in the first two dams, including his Breeders’ Cup winning half sister, Take Charge Brandi.

A tremendous physical makeup, exceptional race record and quality pedigree make Omaha Beach the most exciting stallion prospect to date by superstar stallion War Front. The son of Danzig has made his mark as a sire of sires in Australia this season through the deeds of Declaration of War.

Boasting true breed-shaping potential, Omaha Beach will stand his debut season for $22,000 including GST.

Superstar performer Vino Rosso stormed home to win the most coveted prize in North American racing in 2019, the US$6 million G1 Breeders’ Cup Classic, decimiating the field by 4 1/4 lengths. This win came after he outrivalled G1 winners in the G1 Gold Cup at Santa Anita Stakes, beating a quality field of G1 horses.

An undefeated 2-year-old campaign and Group 2 win at three in the Wood Memorial – a race also won by Frosted, set Vino Rosso up for his outstanding 4-year-old season where earnings exceeded A$6 million (US$3.96m)

Vino Rosso is by outstanding sire Curlin and from Street Cry mare Mythical Bride. The Mr Prospector/Street Cry cross is familiar to Australian breeders, having produced fast G1 winners Con Te Partiro, Lyre, Trekking and The Quarterback, amongst others, in recent years.

Like Omaha Beach, Vino Rosso was oversubscribed in his debut American season covering a full book. He will enter his first Australian season at $13,750 including GST.

Vino Rosso will also join the Spendthrift Roster this season (Spendthrift)

“It’s a big vote of confidence in the Victorian breeding industry for Mr Hughes to shuttle two of the most popular and valuable stud prospects in North America,” said Garry Cuddy, General Manager of Spendthrift Australia.

“Omaha Beach and Vino Rosso represent the best of the best, as multiple G1 winners with rich pedigrees, and like every stallion on our roster, they are by Champion Sires.”

“Omaha Beach and Vino Rosso will be afforded every opportunity at stud when supported by quality mares from the Spendthrift Australia broodmare band,” said Cuddy. “We will be active at the sales over the coming months to purchase mares that specifically complement their profiles.”

Exciting colonial Invincible Spirit-line stallion Overshare, who impressed breeders last season with his first foals, stands his third season at Spendthrift Australia at a fee of $11,000 including GST, the same fee his sire I Am Invincible stood for his first four years. Overshare covered a book of 150 mares in his second season, a direct consquence of his outstanding foal quality.

Gold Standard, the G2 Stan Fox Stakes-winning replica son of Sebring, also set a standard of gold class and quality with his first crop of foals last year. He joins Overshare in his third year at stud and will stand for $5,500 including GST.

Earlier this year Swears first yearlings sold for over 16 times his service fee. These results bode well for the son of sire of sires, Redoute’s Choice, and he remains in a position of affordability to breeders at a fee of $5,500 including GST.

All of Spendthrift Australia’s returning stallions, whose fees remain unchanged for 2020, continue to stand for great value and are available to breeders on one of the world’s best breeding programs in Breed Secure.

Breed Secure is the only breeder’s payment scheme allowing you to pay the service fee after you sell the resultant foal, recoup your expense allowance and secure your financial upside.

For more information about Spendthrift Australia stallions, the Breed Secure program or to set up an inspection, please contact the Spendthrift Australia team.

Office: 03 5421 5600

Garry Cuddy: 0410 451 595

Josh Rix: 0411 116 648

Spendthrift Australia’s full 2020 roster of stallions are as follows:

In a first for the thoroughbred industry globally, Swettenham Stud has launched an initiative to assist breeders by offering extended payment plans and a guarantee of progeny produced by its stallions.

All breeders whose mares are bred to Swettenham Stud stallions in 2020 will have the option of paying service fees in monthly instalments of seven per cent through Thoroughbred Payments. This will start when the mare receives a 45 day scan which essentially spreads the payments over the period until the foal is about five months-old.

Should the mare fail to produce a live foal, all payments will be refunded to the breeder unless they want to continue paying and receive a free return. And should a mare produce a live foal that does not make it to the timing of the final payment, a free return will be issued to the breeder for any mare they nominate for the following season.

Swettenham Stud principal, Adam Sangster, says the initiative is something he genuinely believes breeders can get excited about.

“We’ve spoken to our breeders and heard their challenges in the current circumstances and we believe this will assist them to budget for the stallion that they want, and with a guarantee of the foal getting to weanling stage,” Mr Sangster said.

“We will of course continue to offer live foal payment terms for clients who wish to choose that option, and earlier payments plans for those who wish, but we’ll ensure that all our breeders are looked after and are managing their cash flow.”

Swettenham Stud prides itself on doing anything it can to look after breeders who support the stallions and is always open to flexible arrangements which is one of the many benefits of having an Australian owned and managed farm where direct access to the principal of the business is always available.

Based at Nagambie, Swettenham Stud is home to Toronado, Akeed Mofeed, Highland Reel, I Am Immortal, Puissance de Lune and Trust In A Gust.

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O'Tauto wins at Flemington, he is bred by Larnuek and sired by O'Lonhro (Racing Photos)

Prolific Victorian nursery, Larneuk Stud, has announced fees for its 2020 stallion lineup, with significant reductions across the board.

Despite the continued success of O’Lonhro and Cluster, along with the positive vibes around Wolf Cry’s rising 2YOs, Larneuk’s new roster structure represents a 20% decrease on last spring.

Cluster will now stand at $5,500, O’Lonhro for $4,400, while Wolf Cry also represents tremendous value at $3,300.

Larneuk Stud’s Neville Murdoch is pragmatic about the ‘drop’.

“Larneuk has been standing stallions for over 20 years but we’ve never seen anything like the current situation,” Neville points out. “You can try and put a positive spin on things, but breeders – the very breeders who support the Victorian industry, year in and year out – are facing some tough times.

“Despite everyone knowing that the fee is actually the cheapest thing about keeping a broodmare, many owners are going to leaving them ‘dry’ in the paddock this year. The sad irony is, that this is the exact time you should be breeding, particularly given that demand will be even greater on the other side of all this coronavirus mess.

“We just want to look after those who have looked after us and will certainly be doing deals on multiple bookings.”

O’LONHRO – the sire of Group 2 winner Mamzelle Tess, Flemington Group placed O’Tauto, stakes placed O’Lonera (6 time winner over $500k plus) and recent city winners Mr Bellagio and Gigglon – is clearly one of the best ROI sires in Victoria.

With winners of over $6 million, O’Lonhro’s sire, Lonhro, is now regarded one of the best speed sources in the nation and his sire sons include Pierro (23 stakes winners, $137,500 fee).

Meanwhile, with his oldest runners 3YOs, the Peter & Paul Snowden trained, Group 2 winning sprinter, CLUSTER, has only had a handful of runners but they include the stakes placed 2YO winner Gee Gees Darl, along with multiple winners such as Galaxy and Centaur.

A son of proven sire of sires, Fastnet Rock, Cluster’s progeny have sold up to $72,000 at the Melbourne Premier.
Larneuk Stud also eagerly awaits the first 2YOs by WOLF CRY due to hit the tracks this spring.

Multiple stakes placed at 2, including a third to subsequent Golden Slipper winner and sire, Vancouver, and third to Group 1 Golden Rose winner, Exosphere in the Group 2 Skyline, Wolf Cry joins Street Boss (2020 fee: $27,500) and Pride of Dubai (2020 fee: $38,500) as sons of the legendary Street Cry (131 stakes winners) standing in Australia.

Hailing from one of Australia’s pre-eminent family’s, Wolf Cry was purchased for $320,000 as a yearling and, importantly, is throwing them to type.

 

For further information on Larneuk Stud’s 2020 lineup, phone Neville Murdoch on 0418 105 706.